2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157222
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hot Flashes, Sleep Disruption, Emotional Distress Symptoms and Hormones
Abstract:
Hot Flashes, Sleep Disruption, Emotional Distress Symptoms and Hormones
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Woods, Nancy, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Dean and Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Box 357260, Seattle, WA, 98195-7260, USA
Contact Telephone:206-221-2472
Co-Authors:Ellen Mitchell, RN, PhD; Eunice Yun Tao, MD; Kathleen Smith-DiJulio RN, MA; and Don Percival, PhD
Purpose: Determine the relationship between hot flashes, sleep disruption, and emotional distress symptoms and estrone, FSH, testosterone, and cortisol levels in a longitudinal study of the menopausal transition. Background: Despite common assumptions that hot flashes, sleep disruption, and emotional distress are related to the menopausal transition, the evidence is controversial. Most studies have relied on infrequent (annual) measures of endocrine values at a period in which they are highly variable and many reports have been cross-sectional in nature.
Methods: Data for cross-correlation analyses were from daily health diary records in which women rated the severity of their symptoms. Assays for estrone, FSH, cortisol, and testosterone were from first am voided urine specimens obtained on day 6 of cycles for women with identifiable cycles and on an agreed date monthly for women who did not have identifiable cycles or who were postmenopausal. There were 38 women who met the criteria of having had the final menstrual period and who had at least 10 data points between the middle transition stage to postmenopause. Hot flash, sleep disruption, and emotional distress symptoms were aggregated across each 3 day segment of diary recordings. The binomial (sign) was used to test the statistical significance of the cross-correlations. Results: The binomial test indicated a significant positive cross-correlation between hot flash and FSH (p=0.014). The sample mean of the estimated cross-correlations was 0.2. The binomial test indicated a significant negative cross-correlation between hot flash severity and Estrone (p<.0001). The sample mean of the estimated cross-correlations was -0.3. For hot flashes and testosterone and cortisol, we could not reject the null hypothesis of zero correlation. The cross-correlation between sleep disturbance symptoms and estrone was negative and significant (p=0.003). There were no other significant cross correlations with sleep disturbance symptoms and none with emotional distress symptoms. Conclusions: These data from a longitudinal study of the transition to menopause indicate that women with more severe hot flashes had higher FSH levels and lower estrone levels, consistent with data from other studies. Sleep disturbance was more severe among women with lower estrone levels. There is no evidence to support a relationship between HPO axis hormones and emotional distress symptoms. Grant Support: NINR R01-NR04141; NINR P30 NR04001.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHot Flashes, Sleep Disruption, Emotional Distress Symptoms and Hormonesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157222-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hot Flashes, Sleep Disruption, Emotional Distress Symptoms and Hormones</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Woods, Nancy, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean and Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Box 357260, Seattle, WA, 98195-7260, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-221-2472</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nfwoods@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ellen Mitchell, RN, PhD; Eunice Yun Tao, MD; Kathleen Smith-DiJulio RN, MA; and Don Percival, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Determine the relationship between hot flashes, sleep disruption, and emotional distress symptoms and estrone, FSH, testosterone, and cortisol levels in a longitudinal study of the menopausal transition. Background: Despite common assumptions that hot flashes, sleep disruption, and emotional distress are related to the menopausal transition, the evidence is controversial. Most studies have relied on infrequent (annual) measures of endocrine values at a period in which they are highly variable and many reports have been cross-sectional in nature. <br/>Methods: Data for cross-correlation analyses were from daily health diary records in which women rated the severity of their symptoms. Assays for estrone, FSH, cortisol, and testosterone were from first am voided urine specimens obtained on day 6 of cycles for women with identifiable cycles and on an agreed date monthly for women who did not have identifiable cycles or who were postmenopausal. There were 38 women who met the criteria of having had the final menstrual period and who had at least 10 data points between the middle transition stage to postmenopause. Hot flash, sleep disruption, and emotional distress symptoms were aggregated across each 3 day segment of diary recordings. The binomial (sign) was used to test the statistical significance of the cross-correlations. Results: The binomial test indicated a significant positive cross-correlation between hot flash and FSH (p=0.014). The sample mean of the estimated cross-correlations was 0.2. The binomial test indicated a significant negative cross-correlation between hot flash severity and Estrone (p&lt;.0001). The sample mean of the estimated cross-correlations was -0.3. For hot flashes and testosterone and cortisol, we could not reject the null hypothesis of zero correlation. The cross-correlation between sleep disturbance symptoms and estrone was negative and significant (p=0.003). There were no other significant cross correlations with sleep disturbance symptoms and none with emotional distress symptoms. Conclusions: These data from a longitudinal study of the transition to menopause indicate that women with more severe hot flashes had higher FSH levels and lower estrone levels, consistent with data from other studies. Sleep disturbance was more severe among women with lower estrone levels. There is no evidence to support a relationship between HPO axis hormones and emotional distress symptoms. Grant Support: NINR R01-NR04141; NINR P30 NR04001.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:40:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:40:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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