2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157225
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Characteristics of Foreign Nurses and U.S. Nurses: A Trend Analysis
Abstract:
Characteristics of Foreign Nurses and U.S. Nurses: A Trend Analysis
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Xu, Yu, PhD, RN, CTN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:2445 Marlene Way, Henderson, NV, 89014, USA
Contact Telephone:702-895-3175
Co-Authors:Chanyeong Kwak, PhD, RN
Purpose: To compare the characteristics of internationally educated nurses and U.S. educated nurses regarding demographics, educational preparation and employment. Rationale: Internationally educated nurses make up about 4% of the 2.7 million of the U.S. registered nurse workforce. There is very limited data on internationally educated nurses. No comparative studies have been conducted to examine these two groups of nurses regarding their demographical, educational and employment characteristics. As the number of foreign nurses is growing, the need to study and understand this unique segment of the U.S. registered nurse workforce is greater than ever. Methods: This study is a secondary analysis of National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses datasets (1977-2000). Descriptive statistics were generated by using the statistical software package - STATA. Observations of interested variables were examined from both inter-group and intra-group (longitudinal) comparisons to present a comparative profile of internationally educated nurses and U.S. educated nurses. Results: Internationally educated nurses were younger but more experienced and better prepared educationally worked more hours in both primary and secondary nursing positions with a higher annual income, were primarily employed in urban hospitals as staff RNs in direct care role with an increasing proportion working in extended care facilities, and had a higher geographical mobility. Implications: First, internationally educated nurses were likely to have longer, more productive nursing careers. Second, because of their demographical and employment characteristics, internationally educated nurses had a greater impact on relieving the U.S. nurse shortage per capita during 1977-2000. Third, internationally educated nurses were making increasingly important contributions to the care of Americans, particularly older Americans and those cared for in inner city hospitals, both in quantitative and qualitative terms. Therefore, the practice of recruitment and retention of internationally educated nurses was justified not only from an economic perspective, but also from the policy standpoint of nurse workforce planning and utilization.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCharacteristics of Foreign Nurses and U.S. Nurses: A Trend Analysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157225-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Characteristics of Foreign Nurses and U.S. Nurses: A Trend Analysis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Xu, Yu, PhD, RN, CTN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada, Las Vegas</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2445 Marlene Way, Henderson, NV, 89014, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">702-895-3175</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yu.xu@unlv.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Chanyeong Kwak, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To compare the characteristics of internationally educated nurses and U.S. educated nurses regarding demographics, educational preparation and employment. Rationale: Internationally educated nurses make up about 4% of the 2.7 million of the U.S. registered nurse workforce. There is very limited data on internationally educated nurses. No comparative studies have been conducted to examine these two groups of nurses regarding their demographical, educational and employment characteristics. As the number of foreign nurses is growing, the need to study and understand this unique segment of the U.S. registered nurse workforce is greater than ever. Methods: This study is a secondary analysis of National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses datasets (1977-2000). Descriptive statistics were generated by using the statistical software package - STATA. Observations of interested variables were examined from both inter-group and intra-group (longitudinal) comparisons to present a comparative profile of internationally educated nurses and U.S. educated nurses. Results: Internationally educated nurses were younger but more experienced and better prepared educationally worked more hours in both primary and secondary nursing positions with a higher annual income, were primarily employed in urban hospitals as staff RNs in direct care role with an increasing proportion working in extended care facilities, and had a higher geographical mobility. Implications: First, internationally educated nurses were likely to have longer, more productive nursing careers. Second, because of their demographical and employment characteristics, internationally educated nurses had a greater impact on relieving the U.S. nurse shortage per capita during 1977-2000. Third, internationally educated nurses were making increasingly important contributions to the care of Americans, particularly older Americans and those cared for in inner city hospitals, both in quantitative and qualitative terms. Therefore, the practice of recruitment and retention of internationally educated nurses was justified not only from an economic perspective, but also from the policy standpoint of nurse workforce planning and utilization.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:40:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:40:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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