2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157227
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Teams Study - How Do the Diets of Middle School Students Measure Up?
Abstract:
Teams Study - How Do the Diets of Middle School Students Measure Up?
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Bindler, Ruth, RNC, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University, College of Nursing
Title:Professor
Contact Address:103 E Spokane Falls Blvd, PO Box 1495, Spokane, WA, 99210-1495, USA
Contact Telephone:509-358-7935
Co-Authors:Kenneth Daratha, PhD, Assistant Professor
Purpose: The purposes of this study were to 1) describe the diets of middle school students, and 2) identify the strengths, weaknesses, and health correlates of the diets of middle school students. Rationale/Background: The long-term goal of the four-year Teen Eating and Activity Mentoring in Schools (TEAMS) study is to improve the health of middle school students and prevent development of obesity during adolescence. The project responds to the need for prevention and treatment efforts to address the obesity epidemic among youth by applying the theories of the Ecology of Development and Self Determination to individual, family, and environmental interventions in four middle schools. Methods: Assessments and interviews were completed in Fall 2007 on 103 middle school students enrolled in the TEAMS study. Each student was measured for height and weight using NHANES protocols, from which body mass index (BMI) and BMI percentile were calculated. Each student also completed a 24-hour dietary recall with trained personnel; parents completed demographic forms from which gender and free or reduced lunch data were obtained. Results: Of the sample tested in Fall 2007, 48 (46.6%) were male and 55 (53.4%) were female. Forty-five youth (43.7%) were receiving free or reduced cost lunch. Fifty (48.5%) of the youth were within the recommended BMI percentile range, while 19 (18.4%) were overweight, and 33 (32%) were obese. Reported mean caloric and fat intake were within recommended levels. Protein intake was greater than twice the recommended level (78.8 grams vs. 34.3 grams), and mean carbohydrate intake was twice the recommended level (263.4 grams vs. 130.0 grams). Nearly all youth met recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) for B vitamins, while there were large deficits in intake of vitamin C (59, 57.3% deficient), and vitamin A (58, 56.3% deficient). Additional descriptive and correlational statistics of the middle school diets will be reported. Implications: Over 50% of this cohort of middle school students was overweight or obese, exceeding the national average of 36% of youth who are in those categories. The dietary analysis revealed dietary deficiencies, as well as nutrients that were within recommended levels. Deficits should be addressed in individual and population-based instruction about nutritional needs. Youth and parents in the experimental cohort of the TEAMS study have received interventions that address these dietary findings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTeams Study - How Do the Diets of Middle School Students Measure Up?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157227-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Teams Study - How Do the Diets of Middle School Students Measure Up?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bindler, Ruth, RNC, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">103 E Spokane Falls Blvd, PO Box 1495, Spokane, WA, 99210-1495, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">509-358-7935</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bindler@wsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kenneth Daratha, PhD, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purposes of this study were to 1) describe the diets of middle school students, and 2) identify the strengths, weaknesses, and health correlates of the diets of middle school students. Rationale/Background: The long-term goal of the four-year Teen Eating and Activity Mentoring in Schools (TEAMS) study is to improve the health of middle school students and prevent development of obesity during adolescence. The project responds to the need for prevention and treatment efforts to address the obesity epidemic among youth by applying the theories of the Ecology of Development and Self Determination to individual, family, and environmental interventions in four middle schools. Methods: Assessments and interviews were completed in Fall 2007 on 103 middle school students enrolled in the TEAMS study. Each student was measured for height and weight using NHANES protocols, from which body mass index (BMI) and BMI percentile were calculated. Each student also completed a 24-hour dietary recall with trained personnel; parents completed demographic forms from which gender and free or reduced lunch data were obtained. Results: Of the sample tested in Fall 2007, 48 (46.6%) were male and 55 (53.4%) were female. Forty-five youth (43.7%) were receiving free or reduced cost lunch. Fifty (48.5%) of the youth were within the recommended BMI percentile range, while 19 (18.4%) were overweight, and 33 (32%) were obese. Reported mean caloric and fat intake were within recommended levels. Protein intake was greater than twice the recommended level (78.8 grams vs. 34.3 grams), and mean carbohydrate intake was twice the recommended level (263.4 grams vs. 130.0 grams). Nearly all youth met recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) for B vitamins, while there were large deficits in intake of vitamin C (59, 57.3% deficient), and vitamin A (58, 56.3% deficient). Additional descriptive and correlational statistics of the middle school diets will be reported. Implications: Over 50% of this cohort of middle school students was overweight or obese, exceeding the national average of 36% of youth who are in those categories. The dietary analysis revealed dietary deficiencies, as well as nutrients that were within recommended levels. Deficits should be addressed in individual and population-based instruction about nutritional needs. Youth and parents in the experimental cohort of the TEAMS study have received interventions that address these dietary findings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:40:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:40:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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