2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157229
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Discovering Children's Perceptions and Misconstructions of Chronic Illness
Abstract:
Discovering Children's Perceptions and Misconstructions of Chronic Illness
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Christian, Becky, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Utah, College of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor and Division Chair
Contact Address:10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112-5880, USA
Contact Telephone:801-783-5706
Purpose: Three grounded theory studies of children and adolescents with chronic illness will be used to explore perceptions, understanding, and personal meaning of chronic illness. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Bronfenbrenner's socioecological developmental framework was used to guide this research. Children and adolescents with chronic illness acquire an understanding and develop a personal meaning of their chronic illness and prognosis. Parents, families, and healthcare providers contribute to these impressions, which children then filter through their limited cognitive ability, and manage through selective disclosures and concealment to minimize differences from peers. However, children's perceptions about chronic illness may be discordant with those of parents and healthcare providers. Methods: A grounded theory approach was used in three studies of children and adolescents with chronic illness to explore their perceptions, understanding, and personal meaning of chronic illness. A purposeful sample of 55 children and adolescents (ages 6 to 22 years) with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) was obtained across three studies and theoretical saturation was achieved. Individual in-depth interviews (1 to 2 hours) were conducted. Strategies of reflection and paraphrasing were used to clarify meaning, and to confirm accuracy and credibility of data. Critical life events timelines were used by children to visually display key chronic illness events in their lives. Data analysis was conducted with the constant-comparative method using open, axial, and selective coding to identify core categories, dimensions, and relationships of the phenomenon. Results: Children and adolescents characterized their perceptions and understanding of their chronic illness across three qualitative studies, as discovering a different life course by: (a) discovering a sense of difference (school-age children); (b) reducing a sense of difference (early-to-middle adolescence); and (c) discovering the chronic illness course (late adolescence). These perceptions lead to a social construction of the sick-self and a different reality including an expectation for early death, which may not be embedded in fact. Further, children's and adolescents' impressions revealed hidden truths and multiple realities about the social consequences of chronic illness in their everyday lives. Implications: Discovering these multiple realities of children and adolescents with chronic illness revealed hidden truths embedded in the children's and adolescents' perceptions about growing up with chronic illness. Understanding how children and adolescents perceive their chronic illness is critical for developing interventions to address the social consequences of chronic illness and improve quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDiscovering Children's Perceptions and Misconstructions of Chronic Illnessen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157229-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Discovering Children's Perceptions and Misconstructions of Chronic Illness</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Christian, Becky, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Utah, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor and Division Chair</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112-5880, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-783-5706</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Becky.Christian@nurs.utah.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Three grounded theory studies of children and adolescents with chronic illness will be used to explore perceptions, understanding, and personal meaning of chronic illness. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Bronfenbrenner's socioecological developmental framework was used to guide this research. Children and adolescents with chronic illness acquire an understanding and develop a personal meaning of their chronic illness and prognosis. Parents, families, and healthcare providers contribute to these impressions, which children then filter through their limited cognitive ability, and manage through selective disclosures and concealment to minimize differences from peers. However, children's perceptions about chronic illness may be discordant with those of parents and healthcare providers. Methods: A grounded theory approach was used in three studies of children and adolescents with chronic illness to explore their perceptions, understanding, and personal meaning of chronic illness. A purposeful sample of 55 children and adolescents (ages 6 to 22 years) with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) was obtained across three studies and theoretical saturation was achieved. Individual in-depth interviews (1 to 2 hours) were conducted. Strategies of reflection and paraphrasing were used to clarify meaning, and to confirm accuracy and credibility of data. Critical life events timelines were used by children to visually display key chronic illness events in their lives. Data analysis was conducted with the constant-comparative method using open, axial, and selective coding to identify core categories, dimensions, and relationships of the phenomenon. Results: Children and adolescents characterized their perceptions and understanding of their chronic illness across three qualitative studies, as discovering a different life course by: (a) discovering a sense of difference (school-age children); (b) reducing a sense of difference (early-to-middle adolescence); and (c) discovering the chronic illness course (late adolescence). These perceptions lead to a social construction of the sick-self and a different reality including an expectation for early death, which may not be embedded in fact. Further, children's and adolescents' impressions revealed hidden truths and multiple realities about the social consequences of chronic illness in their everyday lives. Implications: Discovering these multiple realities of children and adolescents with chronic illness revealed hidden truths embedded in the children's and adolescents' perceptions about growing up with chronic illness. Understanding how children and adolescents perceive their chronic illness is critical for developing interventions to address the social consequences of chronic illness and improve quality of life.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:40:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:40:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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