2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157231
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Emotional Intelligence of Nurses: Retention and Performance
Abstract:
The Emotional Intelligence of Nurses: Retention and Performance
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Codier, Estelle, RN, MSN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Hawaii, Manoa, Nursing and Dental Hygiene
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:1583 Kanapuu Drive, Kailua, HI, 96734, USA
Contact Telephone:808-783-1583
Co-Authors:Cindy Kamikawa, RN, MSN, Vice President for Nursing; Barbara Molina Kooker, DrPH, APRN, CNAA, BC; Jan Shoultz, RN, DrPH, Professor
Purposes/Aims: The purpose of this quantitative  study was to explore the relationship between Emotional Intelligence (EI) of nurses and organizational outcomes such as retention and performance. Background: Emotional Intelligence, operationalized in this study by the four branch model of EI, consists of the following abilities: 1) the ability to perceive emotions in self and others, 2) the ability to use emotions to facilitate reasoning, 3) the ability to understand emotions in self and others, and 4) the ability to manage emotions in self and others. In professions outside nursing, plentiful research has demonstrated significant correlation between EI and positive organizational outcomes such as performance, organizational commitment, reduced burnout and job retention. Little such research has been done in nursing. A pilot study in 2006 demonstrated  evidence that clinical staff nurse performance correlated with. Using the 4-branch ability model of EI, the present study was designed to replicate and expand upon the pilot study, using a population of 350 nurses from a wide range of roles beyond clinical practice nurses. Methods: Using the MSCEIT, a rigorously tested instrument with high validity and reliability, nurses EI was tested and a range of organizational self report variables collected related to performance and job retention. Gender, ethnicity, specialty, role, etc. were correlated with EI.  Results: Total EI in clinical staff did not correlate with performance level, but sub score results did. Overall EI scores were higher than in the pilot study but descriptive analysis demonstrated similar patterns. Significant gender differences were not demonstrated. EI Scores of clinical staff and managers revealed variable correlations, and organizational outcomes such as reported commitment and anticipated length of anticipated employment differed among varying levels of performance.  Implications: To achieve improvement in clinical and organizational practice in nursing within the context of a challenging practice environment, new approaches are needed that specifically link performance outcomes with specific desired organizational outcomes such as improved commitment and organizational retention. The results of this study suggests that EI may provide a new architecture for understanding this crucial work across a wide range of roles and practice settings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Emotional Intelligence of Nurses: Retention and Performanceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157231-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Emotional Intelligence of Nurses: Retention and Performance</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Codier, Estelle, RN, MSN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Hawaii, Manoa, Nursing and Dental Hygiene</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1583 Kanapuu Drive, Kailua, HI, 96734, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">808-783-1583</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">codier@hawaii.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cindy Kamikawa, RN, MSN, Vice President for Nursing; Barbara Molina Kooker, DrPH, APRN, CNAA, BC; Jan Shoultz, RN, DrPH, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: The purpose of this quantitative&nbsp; study was to explore the relationship between Emotional Intelligence (EI) of nurses and organizational outcomes such as retention and performance. Background: Emotional Intelligence, operationalized in this study by the four branch model of EI, consists of the following abilities: 1) the ability to perceive emotions in self and others, 2) the ability to use emotions to facilitate reasoning, 3) the ability to understand emotions in self and others, and 4) the ability to manage emotions in self and others. In professions outside nursing, plentiful research has demonstrated significant correlation between EI and positive organizational outcomes such as performance, organizational commitment, reduced burnout and job retention. Little such research has been done in nursing. A pilot study in 2006 demonstrated&nbsp; evidence that clinical staff nurse performance correlated with. Using the 4-branch ability model of EI, the present study was designed to replicate and expand upon the pilot study, using a population of 350 nurses from a wide range of roles beyond clinical practice nurses.&nbsp;Methods: Using the MSCEIT, a rigorously tested instrument with high validity and reliability, nurses EI was tested and a range of organizational self report variables collected related to performance and job retention. Gender, ethnicity, specialty, role, etc. were correlated with EI. &nbsp;Results: Total EI in clinical staff did not correlate with performance level, but sub score results did. Overall EI scores were higher than in the pilot study but descriptive analysis demonstrated similar patterns. Significant gender differences were not demonstrated. EI Scores of clinical staff and managers revealed variable correlations, and organizational outcomes such as reported commitment and anticipated length of anticipated employment differed among varying levels of performance.&nbsp;&nbsp;Implications: To achieve improvement in clinical and organizational practice in nursing within the context of a challenging practice environment, new approaches are needed that specifically link performance outcomes with specific desired organizational outcomes such as improved commitment and organizational retention. The results of this study suggests that EI may provide a new architecture for understanding this crucial work across a wide range of roles and practice settings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:41:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:41:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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