Application of the NIH Treatment Fidelity Guidelines to a Tailored Intervention Trial

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157233
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Application of the NIH Treatment Fidelity Guidelines to a Tailored Intervention Trial
Abstract:
Application of the NIH Treatment Fidelity Guidelines to a Tailored Intervention Trial
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Davis, Andra, RN, MN, AOCN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Utah College of Nursing
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA
Contact Telephone:505-821-8689
Co-Authors:Lee Ellington, PhD, Associate Professor; Norissa Honea, PhDc, RN, MSN, AOCN, Clinical Research Nurse/Coordinator
Purpose: This presentation will apply the five-category Treatment Fidelity Framework presented by the NIH Behavior Change Consortium (2005) to this efficacy and feasibility trial of symptom management for prostate cancer survivors. Background and Rationale: Methodological strategies to enhance treatment fidelity largely address issues related to randomized clinical drug trials. Although many treatment fidelity strategies are commonly used, inconsistencies remain in their application and usefulness for behavioral research. Research Issue: In this patient-preference, symptom management intervention trial for prostate cancer survivors during and immediately after radiation therapy, we applied the five-category Framework to project design and initial implementation. For category one, Design, we developed data collection procedures to enable evaluation and replication of the study. For example, we assessed length of intervention sessions and monitored interactions with the nurse facilitator within the session as well as outside of the session (e.g., participant phone calls). For category two, Training, the nurse facilitator role-played both individual and group sessions. Facilitator skill maintenance is also assessed. For Treatment Delivery, we ensure that intervention content and dose are being delivered as specified. To do this, the facilitator and researchers complete checklists. Additionally, digital recordings are reviewed for variation in specific and nonspecific treatment effects. For category four, Treatment Receipt, we have designed the study to increase participant understanding. Assessment of participant understanding and knowledge is measured by post-session questionnaires from both participants and facilitator. During sessions, the facilitator prompts for understanding as well as summarizes information to reinforce knowledge acquisition. Finally, assessment of participant Treatment Enactment is gathered via self-report at subsequent intervention sessions and by follow-up calls post-intervention. Conclusions and Implications: Previous guidelines for treatment fidelity failed to emphasize critical design and reporting factors for behavioral trials. The application of the Treatment Fidelity Framework to behavioral oncology interventions will enhance rigor in our scientific reporting and improve translation of efficacy trials into effective clinical interventions. Adherence to treatment fidelity strategies in biobehavioral research will strengthen the translation of efficacy trials, such as the current project, to effectiveness trials.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleApplication of the NIH Treatment Fidelity Guidelines to a Tailored Intervention Trialen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157233-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Application of the NIH Treatment Fidelity Guidelines to a Tailored Intervention Trial</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Davis, Andra, RN, MN, AOCN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Utah College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">505-821-8689</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">andavis@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lee Ellington, PhD, Associate Professor; Norissa Honea, PhDc, RN, MSN, AOCN, Clinical Research Nurse/Coordinator</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This presentation will apply the five-category Treatment Fidelity Framework presented by the NIH Behavior Change Consortium (2005) to this efficacy and feasibility trial of symptom management for prostate cancer survivors. Background and Rationale: Methodological strategies to enhance treatment fidelity largely address issues related to randomized clinical drug trials. Although many treatment fidelity strategies are commonly used, inconsistencies remain in their application and usefulness for behavioral research. Research Issue: In this patient-preference, symptom management intervention trial for prostate cancer survivors during and immediately after radiation therapy, we applied the five-category Framework to project design and initial implementation. For category one, Design, we developed data collection procedures to enable evaluation and replication of the study. For example, we assessed length of intervention sessions and monitored interactions with the nurse facilitator within the session as well as outside of the session (e.g., participant phone calls). For category two, Training, the nurse facilitator role-played both individual and group sessions. Facilitator skill maintenance is also assessed. For Treatment Delivery, we ensure that intervention content and dose are being delivered as specified. To do this, the facilitator and researchers complete checklists. Additionally, digital recordings are reviewed for variation in specific and nonspecific treatment effects. For category four, Treatment Receipt, we have designed the study to increase participant understanding. Assessment of participant understanding and knowledge is measured by post-session questionnaires from both participants and facilitator. During sessions, the facilitator prompts for understanding as well as summarizes information to reinforce knowledge acquisition. Finally, assessment of participant Treatment Enactment is gathered via self-report at subsequent intervention sessions and by follow-up calls post-intervention. Conclusions and Implications: Previous guidelines for treatment fidelity failed to emphasize critical design and reporting factors for behavioral trials. The application of the Treatment Fidelity Framework to behavioral oncology interventions will enhance rigor in our scientific reporting and improve translation of efficacy trials into effective clinical interventions. Adherence to treatment fidelity strategies in biobehavioral research will strengthen the translation of efficacy trials, such as the current project, to effectiveness trials.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:41:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:41:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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