X Men, Harry Potter & Spiderman: Children Talk About Disease Causation and Inheritance

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157236
Type:
Presentation
Title:
X Men, Harry Potter & Spiderman: Children Talk About Disease Causation and Inheritance
Abstract:
X Men, Harry Potter & Spiderman: Children Talk About Disease Causation and Inheritance
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Driessnack, Martha, PhD, PNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Iowa, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:100 Market Street, #309, Des Moines, IA, 50309, USA
Contact Telephone:515-243-7979
Background: Children's naive theories of biology include basic constructs for understanding disease, including causation and/or inheritance. Naive theories begin to develop as early as 7 years of age and typically are formed by age 10. These early theories, and the lay beliefs that arise from them, are often resistant to change. Research exploring health literacy indicates lay beliefs often influence adults' understanding of and receptiveness to new health information. Engaging children during the period (7-10 years) in which they begin to develop foundational understandings and beliefs about disease provides a rich opportunity to learn more about lay beliefs and the context in which they begin to develop. Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this study was to: 1) explore young children's ideas about disease and inheritance and 2) identify common sources of influence that emerge in their explanations. Method: IRB approval was obtained. Recruitment was conducted through a large metropolitan YMCA. Following consent/assent, data collection was completed in one-to-one sessions on site. Children, ages 7-10 years old, were asked to talk about disease causation and/or patterns of inheritance and how they came to know this information. Resultant data were analyzed using qualitative description and content analysis. Results: 27 children participated. Maximum variation sampling was used to ensure distribution of participants across age, sex, socio-economic status, and geographic heritage. The analysis of the children's explanations revealed how informal family conversations and media exposure combine and surface in children's early understandings of disease causation and/or inheritance. Family members, other adults, peers, and the media were commonly referenced sources. Of particular interest was the pattern of understanding provided by X-Men, Harry Potter, and Spiderman that surfaced in the children's explanation of disease causation and inheritance. Implications: Children today are growing up at the intersection of the genome era and information age. Asking about their expanding networks and information sources provides health care providers with insights into the social worlds that influence their early understanding of disease, its causation, and/or inheritance. These insights may inform educational interventions for young children. They also may provide insight into adult lay beliefs, the social contexts in which they develop and are reinforced, and why they are so resistant to change.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleX Men, Harry Potter & Spiderman: Children Talk About Disease Causation and Inheritanceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157236-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">X Men, Harry Potter &amp; Spiderman: Children Talk About Disease Causation and Inheritance</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Driessnack, Martha, PhD, PNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Iowa, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">100 Market Street, #309, Des Moines, IA, 50309, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">515-243-7979</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">martha-driessnack@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Children's naive theories of biology include basic constructs for understanding disease, including causation and/or inheritance. Naive theories begin to develop as early as 7 years of age and typically are formed by age 10. These early theories, and the lay beliefs that arise from them, are often resistant to change. Research exploring health literacy indicates lay beliefs often influence adults' understanding of and receptiveness to new health information. Engaging children during the period (7-10 years) in which they begin to develop foundational understandings and beliefs about disease provides a rich opportunity to learn more about lay beliefs and the context in which they begin to develop. Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this study was to: 1) explore young children's ideas about disease and inheritance and 2) identify common sources of influence that emerge in their explanations. Method: IRB approval was obtained. Recruitment was conducted through a large metropolitan YMCA. Following consent/assent, data collection was completed in one-to-one sessions on site. Children, ages 7-10 years old, were asked to talk about disease causation and/or patterns of inheritance and how they came to know this information. Resultant data were analyzed using qualitative description and content analysis. Results: 27 children participated. Maximum variation sampling was used to ensure distribution of participants across age, sex, socio-economic status, and geographic heritage. The analysis of the children's explanations revealed how informal family conversations and media exposure combine and surface in children's early understandings of disease causation and/or inheritance. Family members, other adults, peers, and the media were commonly referenced sources. Of particular interest was the pattern of understanding provided by X-Men, Harry Potter, and Spiderman that surfaced in the children's explanation of disease causation and inheritance.&nbsp;Implications: Children today are growing up at the intersection of the genome era and information age. Asking about their expanding networks and information sources provides health care providers with insights into the social worlds that influence their early understanding of disease, its causation, and/or inheritance. These insights may inform educational interventions for young children. They also may provide insight into adult lay beliefs, the social contexts in which they develop and are reinforced, and why they are so resistant to change.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:41:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:41:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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