2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157238
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Does Body Mass Index Influence Mood Disorders in Heart Failure Patients?
Abstract:
Does Body Mass Index Influence Mood Disorders in Heart Failure Patients?
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Evangelista, Lorraine, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of California Los Angeles, School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:700 Tiverton, Factor Building, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6918, USA
Contact Telephone:310-825-8609
Background: Physical limitations and mood disorders are common among heart failure (HF) patients with systolic dysfunction, but little is understood about how being overweight or obese influences these symptoms. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that being overweight or obese as indexed by body mass index is associated with greater physical limitations and mood disorders including anxiety and depression in patients with systolic HF. Methods: Data were collected from 241 patients being seen in a tertiary HF referral center. Degrees of physical limitations, anxiety, and depression were measured using the Duke Activity Scale, Brief Symptom Inventory-Anxiety, and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 Depression Scale. Furthermore, we examined whether being overweight or obese, defined as a body mass index (BMI) between 25 and 29.9 and greater than or equal to 30, respectively, accounted for a significant portion of physical limitations and mood disorders. Results: Patients were age, 56.7 +/- 13.0 years, male (70%), Caucasian (70%), retired (75%), and married (81%), NYHA Class III (53.9%) with mean LVEF, 31.2 +/- 5.4 ). The majority of the 241 participants were classified as being overweight (42%) or obese (35%). In a univariate analysis, being overweight or obese (i.e. BMI greater than or equal to 25) was associated with greater physical limitations (r = -.182, p = .005) anxiety (r = .395, p <. 001), and depressive symptoms (r = .151, p =. 019). Heart failure etiology, anxiety, and increased BMI accounted for 29% of the variance for physical limitations. Furthermore, physical limitations and increased BMI accounted for 18% of the variance in anxiety, while HF etiology and increased BMI accounted for 36% of the variance for depression. These results persisted after controlling for disease severity. Implications: This study demonstrates relatively strong associations between increased BMI and physical limitations, anxiety, and depression in patients with systolic HF. Given the high prevalence rates of these conditions in advanced HF patients, novel approaches that target weight management, physical activity, and mood adjustment simultaneously should be investigated.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDoes Body Mass Index Influence Mood Disorders in Heart Failure Patients?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157238-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Does Body Mass Index Influence Mood Disorders in Heart Failure Patients?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Evangelista, Lorraine, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California Los Angeles, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">700 Tiverton, Factor Building, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6918, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">310-825-8609</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">levangel@ucla.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Physical limitations and mood disorders are common among heart failure (HF) patients with systolic dysfunction, but little is understood about how being overweight or obese influences these symptoms. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that being overweight or obese as indexed by body mass index is associated with greater physical limitations and mood disorders including anxiety and depression in patients with systolic HF. Methods: Data were collected from 241 patients being seen in a tertiary HF referral center. Degrees of physical limitations, anxiety, and depression were measured using the Duke Activity Scale, Brief Symptom Inventory-Anxiety, and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 Depression Scale. Furthermore, we examined whether being overweight or obese, defined as a body mass index (BMI) between 25 and 29.9 and greater than or equal to 30, respectively, accounted for a significant portion of physical limitations and mood disorders. Results: Patients were age, 56.7 +/- 13.0 years, male (70%), Caucasian (70%), retired (75%), and married (81%), NYHA Class III (53.9%) with mean LVEF, 31.2 +/- 5.4 ). The majority of the 241 participants were classified as being overweight (42%) or obese (35%). In a univariate analysis, being overweight or obese (i.e. BMI greater than or equal to 25) was associated with greater physical limitations (r = -.182, p = .005) anxiety (r = .395, p &lt;. 001), and depressive symptoms (r = .151, p =. 019). Heart failure etiology, anxiety, and increased BMI accounted for 29% of the variance for physical limitations. Furthermore, physical limitations and increased BMI accounted for 18% of the variance in anxiety, while HF etiology and increased BMI accounted for 36% of the variance for depression. These results persisted after controlling for disease severity. Implications: This study demonstrates relatively strong associations between increased BMI and physical limitations, anxiety, and depression in patients with systolic HF. Given the high prevalence rates of these conditions in advanced HF patients, novel approaches that target weight management, physical activity, and mood adjustment simultaneously should be investigated.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:41:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:41:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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