Implementing a Participatory Research Partnership for Childhood Obesity Prevention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157239
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implementing a Participatory Research Partnership for Childhood Obesity Prevention
Abstract:
Implementing a Participatory Research Partnership for Childhood Obesity Prevention
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Findholt, Nancy E., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health and Science University, School of Nursing - La Grande Campus
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:One University Boulevard, La Grande, OR, 97850, USA
Contact Telephone:541-962-3648
Co-Authors:Victoria W. Brogoitti, BS, Director; Linda Jerofke, PhD, Assistant Professor; Yvonne L. Michael, ScD, Assistant Professor
Purpose: This presentation will describe the steps taken to establish a participatory research partnership for childhood obesity prevention, achievements during the first three years, and factors that facilitated or were challenges to maintaining the partnership. Background: Community participation in research is advanced as an effective approach for addressing environmental determinants of health disparities.  The participation of community members in research can offer numerous benefits, including a deeper understanding of the conditions that influence health, an increased likelihood that the interventions will be culturally appropriate, and greater public awareness and support for the interventions.  However, participatory research partnerships are not easy to establish or sustain. Description of Processes: U.C. Fit Kids is a community-based participatory research project that was initiated in 2005 for prevention of childhood obesity in rural Union County, Oregon. The partners include Oregon Health & Science University (School of Nursing and Department of Public Health & Preventive Medicine); Eastern Oregon University; the Union County Commission on Children & Families; Union County's public school districts, hospital, and public health department; and several community organizations that provide food or physical activity programs to children.  Early steps in partnership formation included developing an organizational infrastructure, establishing member roles, determining a process for group decision making, and engaging members in discussions about environmental influences on children's physical activity and food choices. Outcomes Achieved: Principal achievements during the first three years included the receipt of grant awards from the NIH and private sources, completion of an in-depth community assessment, development of an intervention plan, and submission of proposals for implementation. Conclusions: Factors helpful in establishing and maintaining the partnership included building on a past collaborative effort, involving college students in the coalition's work, having a strong lead organization, and providing honorariums to members who participated in data collection.  Challenges in sustaining the partnership included members' time constraints, lag time while waiting for funding, and balancing community interests with research needs.  Our experiences provide insights that may be helpful to other nurse researchers in establishing effective participatory research partnerships.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplementing a Participatory Research Partnership for Childhood Obesity Preventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157239-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Implementing a Participatory Research Partnership for Childhood Obesity Prevention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Findholt, Nancy E., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health and Science University, School of Nursing - La Grande Campus</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">One University Boulevard, La Grande, OR, 97850, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">541-962-3648</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">findholt@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Victoria W. Brogoitti, BS, Director; Linda Jerofke, PhD, Assistant Professor; Yvonne L. Michael, ScD, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This presentation will describe the steps taken to establish a participatory research partnership for childhood obesity prevention, achievements during the first three years, and factors that facilitated or were challenges to maintaining the partnership.&nbsp;Background: Community participation in research is advanced as an effective approach for addressing environmental determinants of health disparities.&nbsp; The participation of community members in research can offer numerous benefits, including a deeper understanding of the conditions that influence health, an increased likelihood that the interventions will be culturally appropriate, and greater public awareness and support for the interventions.&nbsp; However, participatory research partnerships are not easy to establish or sustain.&nbsp;Description of Processes: U.C. Fit Kids is a community-based participatory research project that was initiated in 2005 for prevention of childhood obesity in rural Union County, Oregon. The partners include Oregon Health &amp; Science University (School of Nursing and Department of Public Health &amp; Preventive Medicine); Eastern Oregon University; the Union County Commission on Children &amp; Families; Union County's public school districts, hospital, and public health department; and several community organizations that provide food or physical activity programs to children.&nbsp; Early steps in partnership formation included developing an organizational infrastructure, establishing member roles, determining a process for group decision making, and engaging members in discussions about environmental influences on children's physical activity and food choices.&nbsp;Outcomes Achieved: Principal achievements during the first three years included the receipt of grant awards from the NIH and private sources, completion of an in-depth community assessment, development of an intervention plan, and submission of proposals for implementation.&nbsp;Conclusions: Factors helpful in establishing and maintaining the partnership included building on a past collaborative effort, involving college students in the coalition's work, having a strong lead organization, and providing honorariums to members who participated in data collection.&nbsp; Challenges in sustaining the partnership included members' time constraints, lag time while waiting for funding, and balancing community interests with research needs.&nbsp; Our experiences provide insights that may be helpful to other nurse researchers in establishing effective participatory research partnerships.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:41:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:41:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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