2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157242
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Risks for Elevated PTSD Scores Among Deployed Military Personnel
Abstract:
Risks for Elevated PTSD Scores Among Deployed Military Personnel
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Lewis, Paul C., FNP-C, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:U.S. Army, Nursing Research Service
Title:Lieutenant Colonel
Contact Address:3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX, 78234, USA
Contact Telephone:210-916-3937
Purpose/Aims:  The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of an extended deployment on a post traumatic stress disorder scale and determine if any predictors existed which might assist in predicting which soldiers would experience difficulties during a deployment. Background: The incidence of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) among soldiers returning from the combat zone has prompted researchers to explore the possible causes. Richardson, Naifeh, and Elihai (2007) found that of the 1016 male veterans surveyed, 10.92% had PTSD Checklist (PCL) scores greater than 50% for those deployed once and 14.4% for those deployed more than once. Rona (2007) surveyed 5,547 members of the British military and found that deployment beyond 12 months in a 36 month period resulted in psychological symptoms and problems once they returned and that staying deployed for longer than expected resulted in greater incident of PTSD symptoms.  With the U.S. military deploying frequently and for long periods of time, determining possible contributing factors to post-deployment PTSD may allow programs to alleviate and possibly remove some of the stressors that lead to PTSD among deployed service members. Method(s): Cross-sectional descriptive study.  Framework and guidance for this process was provided by the framework of post traumatic stress.  The Soldier Wellness Survey was offered to all combat support hospital personnel at month 12 of their deployment in electronic or paper format.  All survey responses were anonymous.  The Soldier Wellness Survey was designed with six groupings of questions which include demographics, deployment history, diversions, health behaviors, safety, and family concerns. Results:  The average age of the respondents was 31.3 (+/- 7.97) years old with slightly over half (55%) being male. The rank of the respondents included 41% NCO (E5-E8), 25% junior enlisted (E1-E4), 23% junior officer (O1-O3) and 11% senior officer (O4-O6).  The majority were married (66%) and most of those having children at home (48%). The dependant variable for this study, PCL-M, was a continuous variable with a range of 17 to 73 and a mean of 33.3 (SD 12.7).  The PCL-M score was either weakly or moderately and significantly correlated with 12 items in the Soldier Wellness Survey representing at least one question from each grouping of questions. Using a stepwise linear regression entering the 12 significant items, 63% of the variance in the PCL-M scale was explained with only 5 variables in the final model. Difficulty sleeping explained the most variance (42.2%) followed by taking sleep medications (11.1%), the feeling of not being safe (5.4%), the length of the previous deployment (3.4%), and concern over family issues (3.2%). IMPLICATIONS:  This model would seem to indicate that difficulty sleeping and the need to take sleep medication may be one of the early markers of psychological stress and PCL-M scores elevation.  This would be a key indicator for deployed leaders to be able to target those individuals who may be experiencing deployment related stress and intervene to decrease the soldier's stress and anxiety. The ultimate goal would be to intervene and alleviate the symptoms early enough to potentially avoid the development of post-deployment PTSD.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRisks for Elevated PTSD Scores Among Deployed Military Personnelen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157242-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Risks for Elevated PTSD Scores Among Deployed Military Personnel</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lewis, Paul C., FNP-C, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">U.S. Army, Nursing Research Service</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Lieutenant Colonel</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Fort Sam Houston, TX, 78234, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">210-916-3937</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">paul.lewis@amedd.army.mil, lewispc@earthlink.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims:&nbsp; The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of an extended deployment on a post traumatic stress disorder scale and determine if any predictors existed which might assist in predicting which soldiers would experience difficulties during a deployment.&nbsp;Background: The incidence of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) among soldiers returning from the combat zone has prompted researchers to explore the possible causes. Richardson, Naifeh, and Elihai (2007) found that of the 1016 male veterans surveyed, 10.92% had PTSD Checklist (PCL) scores greater than 50% for those deployed once and 14.4% for those deployed more than once. Rona (2007) surveyed 5,547 members of the British military and found that deployment beyond 12 months in a 36 month period resulted in psychological symptoms and problems once they returned and that staying deployed for longer than expected resulted in greater incident of PTSD symptoms.&nbsp; With the U.S. military deploying frequently and for long periods of time, determining possible contributing factors to post-deployment PTSD may allow programs to alleviate and possibly remove some of the stressors that lead to PTSD among deployed service members. Method(s): Cross-sectional descriptive study.&nbsp; Framework and guidance for this process was provided by the framework of post traumatic stress.&nbsp; The Soldier Wellness Survey was offered to all combat support hospital personnel at month 12 of their deployment in electronic or paper format.&nbsp; All survey responses were anonymous.&nbsp; The Soldier Wellness Survey was designed with six groupings of questions which include demographics, deployment history, diversions, health behaviors, safety, and family concerns. Results:&nbsp; The average age of the respondents was 31.3 (+/- 7.97) years old with slightly over half (55%) being male. The rank of the respondents included 41% NCO (E5-E8), 25% junior enlisted (E1-E4), 23% junior officer (O1-O3) and 11% senior officer (O4-O6).&nbsp; The majority were married (66%) and most of those having children at home (48%). The dependant variable for this study, PCL-M, was a continuous variable with a range of 17 to 73 and a mean of 33.3 (SD 12.7).&nbsp; The PCL-M score was either weakly or moderately and significantly correlated with 12 items in the Soldier Wellness Survey representing at least one question from each grouping of questions. Using a stepwise linear regression entering the 12 significant items, 63% of the variance in the PCL-M scale was explained with only 5 variables in the final model. Difficulty sleeping explained the most variance (42.2%) followed by taking sleep medications (11.1%), the feeling of not being safe (5.4%), the length of the previous deployment (3.4%), and concern over family issues (3.2%). IMPLICATIONS:&nbsp; This model would seem to indicate that difficulty sleeping and the need to take sleep medication may be one of the early markers of psychological stress and PCL-M scores elevation.&nbsp; This would be a key indicator for deployed leaders to be able to target those individuals who may be experiencing deployment related stress and intervene to decrease the soldier's stress and anxiety. The ultimate goal would be to intervene and alleviate the symptoms early enough to potentially avoid the development of post-deployment PTSD.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:41:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:41:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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