2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157246
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bias in the Nursing Workplace: Implications for Retention
Abstract:
Bias in the Nursing Workplace: Implications for Retention
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Moceri, Joane T., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington Tacoma, Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Box 358421, 1900 Commerce Street, Tacoma, WA, 98402, USA
Contact Telephone:253-692-5673
Purpose and Aims: The nursing shortage coupled with health inequities makes it imperative to retain nurses, and especially nurses of color in the workplace. The purpose of this study was to measure the prevalence of bias in the nursing workplace. Further aims were to develop and test a scale to measure bias in the workplace and to develop an operational definition of the term "bias" from data provided by nurses participating in the study. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: While some studies have been conducted on implicit bias in health providers, there has been little written about the experiences of nurses of color, or even nurses in general, concerning bias between nurses in the workplace. It is known that the work environment affects retention of nurses. Thus, discovering how much bias is occurring, what constitutes bias as experienced by nurses, and how it relates to intention to stay or leave a place of employment are important to the retention of nurses in the workplace. Methods: Human Subjects permission was obtained from the University of Washington prior to beginning the study. The survey consisted of 22 questions and a demographic questionnaire. The survey tool was designed to measure the prevalence of bias and the effects of bias on nurse retention in the nursing workplace. Questions for the survey were created based on a review of the literature as well as from data obtained during a prior study with Latina nurses and nursing students. Nurses attending a national conference were given information about the study then asked to complete the study instrument. The instrument included a Lickert-like scale as well as questions about descriptions of bias requiring short answers. The demographic form included questions about age, gender, level of education, presence of an accent, and intention to remain in the participants' current workplace. Results: Data from the study indicate that nurses of color experienced bias on a regular and ongoing basis, and also reported witnessing it on a regular and ongoing basis. White nurses reported that they rarely experienced bias, and reported rarely witnessing bias. There was a positive correlation between experiencing bias and intent to leave employment. Implications: As the nursing shortage continues and increases in severity, retaining nurses becomes as important as creating new nurses. We cannot afford to lose nurses because of bias. Nurse managers, hospital administrators, and nurse educators must develop strategies to support nurses of color as well as to educate and promote non-biased interactions between nurses in the workplace. Further study is planned and will include surveying a greater number of nurses of color from a variety of racial/ethnic groups, as well as nurses across a health care system. Higher numbers are needed to continue to test the validity and reliability of the study instrument.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBias in the Nursing Workplace: Implications for Retentionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157246-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Bias in the Nursing Workplace: Implications for Retention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Moceri, Joane T., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington Tacoma, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 358421, 1900 Commerce Street, Tacoma, WA, 98402, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">253-692-5673</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jmoceri@u.washington.edu, joanemoceri@gmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose and Aims: The nursing shortage coupled with health inequities makes it imperative to retain nurses, and especially nurses of color in the workplace. The purpose of this study was to measure the prevalence of bias in the nursing workplace. Further aims were to develop and test a scale to measure bias in the workplace and to develop an operational definition of the term &quot;bias&quot; from data provided by nurses participating in the study. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: While some studies have been conducted on implicit bias in health providers, there has been little written about the experiences of nurses of color, or even nurses in general, concerning bias between nurses in the workplace. It is known that the work environment affects retention of nurses. Thus, discovering how much bias is occurring, what constitutes bias as experienced by nurses, and how it relates to intention to stay or leave a place of employment are important to the retention of nurses in the workplace. Methods: Human Subjects permission was obtained from the University of Washington prior to beginning the study. The survey consisted of 22 questions and a demographic questionnaire. The survey tool was designed to measure the prevalence of bias and the effects of bias on nurse retention in the nursing workplace. Questions for the survey were created based on a review of the literature as well as from data obtained during a prior study with Latina nurses and nursing students. Nurses attending a national conference were given information about the study then asked to complete the study instrument. The instrument included a Lickert-like scale as well as questions about descriptions of bias requiring short answers. The demographic form included questions about age, gender, level of education, presence of an accent, and intention to remain in the participants' current workplace. Results: Data from the study indicate that nurses of color experienced bias on a regular and ongoing basis, and also reported witnessing it on a regular and ongoing basis. White nurses reported that they rarely experienced bias, and reported rarely witnessing bias. There was a positive correlation between experiencing bias and intent to leave employment. Implications: As the nursing shortage continues and increases in severity, retaining nurses becomes as important as creating new nurses. We cannot afford to lose nurses because of bias. Nurse managers, hospital administrators, and nurse educators must develop strategies to support nurses of color as well as to educate and promote non-biased interactions between nurses in the workplace. Further study is planned and will include surveying a greater number of nurses of color from a variety of racial/ethnic groups, as well as nurses across a health care system. Higher numbers are needed to continue to test the validity and reliability of the study instrument.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:41:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:41:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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