Facilitated Tucking: as a Non-Pharmacological Nursing Intervention for Relieving Stressful Responses Among Jordanian Pre-term Infants

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157249
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Facilitated Tucking: as a Non-Pharmacological Nursing Intervention for Relieving Stressful Responses Among Jordanian Pre-term Infants
Abstract:
Facilitated Tucking: as a Non-Pharmacological Nursing Intervention for Relieving Stressful Responses Among Jordanian Pre-term Infants
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Obeidat, Hala, RN, MSC, PhDc
P.I. Institution Name:Princess Muna College of Nursing, Nursing, Amman, Jordan (also doctoral student at the University of Jordan Faculty of Nursing)
Title:Doctoral candidate, lecturer
Contact Address:Princess Muna College of Nursing, Mutaa University, Amman, Jordan
Contact Telephone:009-627-7773-124
Co-Authors:Lynn Clark Callister, RN, PhD, FAAN, Professor; Inaam A. Khalaf, RN, PhD, Dean and Associate Professor
Purpose: The purpose of this randomized controlled trial using a cross-over design was to examine the effectiveness of facilitated tucking during heel stick blood draws on relieving stressful responses of preterm infants in a Jordanian newborn intensive care unit (NICU ). Background: Preterm infants in NICUs are exposed to a high number of painful procedures. Repeated and sustained pain has adverse consequences on the neurological, behavioral, cognitive, and learning-oriented development of preterm infants. Systematic and comprehensive pain assessment should be done, considering pain as the fifth vital sign. Facilitated tucking (FT) is the gentle motoric containment of the infant's arms/legs in a flexed midline position close to the infant's trunk in a side-lying or supine position. FT will support motoric boundaries in the preterm infant, maintaining a secure controlled response, thus facilitating self-regulation and normalizing their physiological and behavioral responses to pain and stress, thus maintaining a state of equilibrium. In conjunction with other non-pharmacological nursing interventions, FT can help adaptation to the extra-uterine environment. Methods: Infants acted as their own controls. Based on a power analysis and statistical consultation, the sample consisted of 30 preterm infants between 30-35 weeks gestation (X=37.77 weeks gestation), birth weight 1.060-2.303 kilograms (X=1.649kg). The infants were observed twice during each heel stick blood draw. One heel stick was done with the infant in any position according to NICU care routine, the other was done using FT. The Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) measured the preterm infant?s pain responses. Paired t-tests were used to determine the efficacy of FT for reducing pain during heel stick blood draws. Results: There were significant differences in PIPP scores for FT and non-tucking positions (t = 19.139, p=.000). Regression analyses examined the relationship of gestational age and birth weight on predicting preterm infants stressful responses to heel stick blood drawing. Gestational age was a negative predictor (B=3.442). Implications for Clinical Practice: FT is an effective non-pharmacological nursing intervention that can be utilized either alone or in combination with pharmacological interventions to manage procedural pain in preterm infants in NICUs. In this context nurses also need to cluster care; minimize handling to reduce exposure of preterm infants to painful procedures; use FT to relieve pain in this vulnerable group; administer effective and timely pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic pain management strategies and continually evaluate the care plan to support preterm infants.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFacilitated Tucking: as a Non-Pharmacological Nursing Intervention for Relieving Stressful Responses Among Jordanian Pre-term Infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157249-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Facilitated Tucking: as a Non-Pharmacological Nursing Intervention for Relieving Stressful Responses Among Jordanian Pre-term Infants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Obeidat, Hala, RN, MSC, PhDc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Princess Muna College of Nursing, Nursing, Amman, Jordan (also doctoral student at the University of Jordan Faculty of Nursing)</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral candidate, lecturer</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Princess Muna College of Nursing, Mutaa University, Amman, Jordan</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">009-627-7773-124</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">obeidathala@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lynn Clark Callister, RN, PhD, FAAN, Professor; Inaam A. Khalaf, RN, PhD, Dean and Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this randomized controlled trial using a cross-over design was to examine the effectiveness of facilitated tucking during heel stick blood draws on relieving stressful responses of preterm infants in a Jordanian newborn intensive care unit (NICU ). Background: Preterm infants in NICUs are exposed to a high number of painful procedures. Repeated and sustained pain has adverse consequences on the neurological, behavioral, cognitive, and learning-oriented development of preterm infants. Systematic and comprehensive pain assessment should be done, considering pain as the fifth vital sign. Facilitated tucking (FT) is the gentle motoric containment of the infant's arms/legs in a flexed midline position close to the infant's trunk in a side-lying or supine position. FT will support motoric boundaries in the preterm infant, maintaining a secure controlled response, thus facilitating self-regulation and normalizing their physiological and behavioral responses to pain and stress, thus maintaining a state of equilibrium. In conjunction with other non-pharmacological nursing interventions, FT can help adaptation to the extra-uterine environment. Methods: Infants acted as their own controls. Based on a power analysis and statistical consultation, the sample consisted of 30 preterm infants between 30-35 weeks gestation (X=37.77 weeks gestation), birth weight 1.060-2.303 kilograms (X=1.649kg). The infants were observed twice during each heel stick blood draw. One heel stick was done with the infant in any position according to NICU care routine, the other was done using FT. The Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) measured the preterm infant?s pain responses. Paired t-tests were used to determine the efficacy of FT for reducing pain during heel stick blood draws. Results: There were significant differences in PIPP scores for FT and non-tucking positions (t = 19.139, p=.000). Regression analyses examined the relationship of gestational age and birth weight on predicting preterm infants stressful responses to heel stick blood drawing. Gestational age was a negative predictor (B=3.442). Implications for Clinical Practice: FT is an effective non-pharmacological nursing intervention that can be utilized either alone or in combination with pharmacological interventions to manage procedural pain in preterm infants in NICUs. In this context nurses also need to cluster care; minimize handling to reduce exposure of preterm infants to painful procedures; use FT to relieve pain in this vulnerable group; administer effective and timely pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic pain management strategies and continually evaluate the care plan to support preterm infants.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:42:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:42:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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