Perception of Weight & Perceived Difficulty for a Healthy Lifestyle in Overweight Teens

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157250
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perception of Weight & Perceived Difficulty for a Healthy Lifestyle in Overweight Teens
Abstract:
Perception of Weight & Perceived Difficulty for a Healthy Lifestyle in Overweight Teens
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:O'Haver, Judith, PhD, RN, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University, College Of Nursing & Healthcare Innovation
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:500 N. 3rd St., Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA
Contact Telephone:602-686-0476
Co-Authors:Diana Jacobson, MS, RN, CPNP, Doctoral Candidate; Stephanie Kelly, MS, RN, FNP, Research Assistant; Mary Mays, PhD, Associate Professor; Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, CPNP/NPP, FAAN, FNAP, Dean and Distinguished Foundation Professor in Nursing
Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to assess the relationships among a selected group of variables and to determine if adolescents who were overweight differ in their healthy lifestyle beliefs, attitudes, and choices from their normal weight counterparts. Background: In the past 2 decades, the number of adolescents who are overweight has tripled. Studies suggest that teens that are overweight tend to become overweight adults. Being overweight has been associated with a higher incidence of physical disorders, such as diabetes mellitus type 2, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, sleep apnea, and mental health problems (e.g., depression and poor self-esteem). Methods: A convenience sample of 404 adolescents from 2 high schools in a southwestern state completed a series of questionnaires during their physical education class. The mean age of respondents was 15.1 years, with 48% male and 52% female. In this sample, BMI ranged from 14.7 to 42.8 with a mean of 22.2. Eighty-six of the 404 students had a BMI of >25. Sixty nine percent of the students identified themselves as white (n=279), 16.6% (n=67) as Hispanic, 5% (n=20) as Asian, 3.2% (n=13) as Black, 3% (n=12) as American Indian/Alaskan Native. Findings: When the students with a BMI>25 were asked, ?Have you ever tried to lose weight?? 75 (87%) responded yes and 63 (73.3%) reported that they were trying to lose weight now. When asked ?Compared to other students in your grade who are as tall as you? 38% (n=33) felt that they weighed the right amount, 58% felt that they weighed too much (n=50), and no student responded that they did not weigh enough. Two of these students (2.3%) noted that they would like to weigh more, 75 (87%) said they would like to weigh less, and 7 (8%) said they would like to weigh the same. There were significant positive correlations in this group of overweight teens (p=.01) among their healthy lifestyle choices, healthy living attitudes, and healthy lifestyle beliefs. In addition, there were significant negative correlations between their perceived difficulty in living a healthy lifestyle and their choices, attitudes, and beliefs. Specifically, the more difficult that they perceived living a healthy lifestyle, the less healthy were their beliefs, attitudes, and healthy choices. Implications: Adolescents who are overweight have an accurate perception of their weight and many are actively trying to lose weight. These teens perceived that living a healthy lifestyle was difficult, which affected their health related beliefs, attitudes, and choices. Future intervention studies should incorporate problem solving strategies that affect the perception of difficulty in living a healthy lifestyle for teens.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerception of Weight & Perceived Difficulty for a Healthy Lifestyle in Overweight Teensen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157250-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perception of Weight &amp; Perceived Difficulty for a Healthy Lifestyle in Overweight Teens</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">O'Haver, Judith, PhD, RN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University, College Of Nursing &amp; Healthcare Innovation</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 N. 3rd St., Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">602-686-0476</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">judith.ohaver@asu.edu, johaver@cox.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Diana Jacobson, MS, RN, CPNP, Doctoral Candidate; Stephanie Kelly, MS, RN, FNP, Research Assistant; Mary Mays, PhD, Associate Professor; Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, CPNP/NPP, FAAN, FNAP, Dean and Distinguished Foundation Professor in Nursing</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to assess the relationships among a selected group of variables and to determine if adolescents who were overweight differ in their healthy lifestyle beliefs, attitudes, and choices from their normal weight counterparts. Background: In the past 2 decades, the number of adolescents who are overweight has tripled. Studies suggest that teens that are overweight tend to become overweight adults. Being overweight has been associated with a higher incidence of physical disorders, such as diabetes mellitus type 2, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, sleep apnea, and mental health problems (e.g., depression and poor self-esteem). Methods: A convenience sample of 404 adolescents from 2 high schools in a southwestern state completed a series of questionnaires during their physical education class. The mean age of respondents was 15.1 years, with 48% male and 52% female. In this sample, BMI ranged from 14.7 to 42.8 with a mean of 22.2. Eighty-six of the 404 students had a BMI of &gt;25. Sixty nine percent of the students identified themselves as white (n=279), 16.6% (n=67) as Hispanic, 5% (n=20) as Asian, 3.2% (n=13) as Black, 3% (n=12) as American Indian/Alaskan Native. Findings: When the students with a BMI&gt;25 were asked, ?Have you ever tried to lose weight?? 75 (87%) responded yes and 63 (73.3%) reported that they were trying to lose weight now. When asked ?Compared to other students in your grade who are as tall as you? 38% (n=33) felt that they weighed the right amount, 58% felt that they weighed too much (n=50), and no student responded that they did not weigh enough. Two of these students (2.3%) noted that they would like to weigh more, 75 (87%) said they would like to weigh less, and 7 (8%) said they would like to weigh the same. There were significant positive correlations in this group of overweight teens (p=.01) among their healthy lifestyle choices, healthy living attitudes, and healthy lifestyle beliefs. In addition, there were significant negative correlations between their perceived difficulty in living a healthy lifestyle and their choices, attitudes, and beliefs. Specifically, the more difficult that they perceived living a healthy lifestyle, the less healthy were their beliefs, attitudes, and healthy choices. Implications: Adolescents who are overweight have an accurate perception of their weight and many are actively trying to lose weight. These teens perceived that living a healthy lifestyle was difficult, which affected their health related beliefs, attitudes, and choices. Future intervention studies should incorporate problem solving strategies that affect the perception of difficulty in living a healthy lifestyle for teens.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:42:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:42:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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