Perimenopausal Women's Intended and Actual Response to Bone Health Interventions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157251
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perimenopausal Women's Intended and Actual Response to Bone Health Interventions
Abstract:
Perimenopausal Women's Intended and Actual Response to Bone Health Interventions
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Olson, Ann C. F., PhD, RN, FNP-BC, WHNP-BC, CCD
P.I. Institution Name:Winona State University-Rochester, College of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor/Nurse Practitioner
Contact Address:206 Michaelwood Drive, Winona, MN, 55987, USA
Contact Telephone:507-454-8436
Co-Authors:Judith A. Berg, RNC, WHNP, FAANP, FAAN, Associate Professor
Background: Osteoporosis affects more than 10 million people in the United States and an additional 34 million have low bone density or osteopenia, of which eighty percent are women. To date, focus has been on post-menopausal women and related risks for osteoporosis or treatment options.  Few women are tested for bone density prior to menopause, leaving them unaware of osteoporosis risk until after the rapid bone density loss that occurs during perimenopause. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of bone health testing using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) on outcomes of intentions toward and actual engagement in bone health behaviors (calcium intake, vitamin D intake, and physical activity) among perimenopausal women. Theoretical Framework: The Theory of Planned Behavior guided this study that included outcome constructs of Intentions to engage in and actual bone health Behaviors (calcium and vitamin D intake and physical activity) with independent variables of positive or negative Attitudes, perception of social pressure (Subjective Norms), and perceived ease or difficulty in performing bone health behaviors (Perceived Behavioral Control [PBC]). Methods/Proposed Study Design: A longitudinal repeated measures experimental design was used. One hundred fifty women were randomly assigned to a comparison group (n=75 receiving bone health information) or to an intervention group (n=75 receiving DXA and bone health information). Baseline demographic data were collected; the Prevention Intentions Questionnaire using TPB constructs, and a Behaviors Scale was developed and administered to all participants at baseline, at two weeks, and at two months after interventions. Results: Thirty-two percent of women in the intervention group had low bone density. Intentions: ANOVA found a near-significant interaction effect F (1.57, 228.72) = 2.927, p = .068 and a significant time effect F(1.57, 228.72) = 35.55, p < .001. Behaviors: Significant interaction effect for physical activity F(1.86, 273.76) = 6.124, p = .003, significant time effect for vitamin D F(1.60, 235.20) = 17.53, p < .001, and a near-significant interaction between Calcium and Group F(1.89, 277.27) = 3.06, p = .052.  Correlation found an inverse relationship between Intentions and DXA scores r(74) = -.23, p = .046 at two weeks, and between vitamin D intake and DXA scores r(73) = -.25, p = .03 at two months. Regression found Attitudes contributed significantly in comparison and intervention models at two weeks and at two months; PBC contributed significantly in comparison groups at both time-points; Subjective Norms negatively contributed (Beta = -.23) toward Intentions in the two week comparison group model, R squared = .49, F(1,69) = 59.30, p = .03. The two month comparison group model accounted for 62.0% of the variance in Intentions R squared = .62, F(1,67) = 99.19, p = .04. Intentions significantly correlated with calcium intake r(147) = .40, < .01, vitamin D intake r(147) = .44, < .01, and sports activity r(147) = .33, < .05, throughout the study. Implications for Nursing: Early detection and intervention in perimenopausal bone loss may reduce osteoporosis morbidity and may impact women's quality of life, reduce financial consequences to individuals, families, communities, and the nation.  Bone density testing in pre- and perimenopausal women as an intervention holds promise as a way to reduce osteoporosis morbidity for aging women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerimenopausal Women's Intended and Actual Response to Bone Health Interventionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157251-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perimenopausal Women's Intended and Actual Response to Bone Health Interventions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Olson, Ann C. F., PhD, RN, FNP-BC, WHNP-BC, CCD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Winona State University-Rochester, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor/Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">206 Michaelwood Drive, Winona, MN, 55987, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">507-454-8436</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">aolson@winona.edu, annolson@hbci.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judith A. Berg, RNC, WHNP, FAANP, FAAN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Osteoporosis affects more than 10 million people in the United States and an additional 34 million have low bone density or osteopenia, of which eighty percent are women. To date, focus has been on post-menopausal women and related risks for osteoporosis or treatment options. &nbsp;Few women are tested for bone density prior to menopause, leaving them unaware of osteoporosis risk until after the rapid bone density loss that occurs during perimenopause. Purpose:&nbsp;The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of bone health testing using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) on outcomes of intentions toward and actual&nbsp;engagement in bone health behaviors (calcium intake, vitamin D intake, and physical activity) among perimenopausal women. Theoretical Framework: The Theory of Planned Behavior guided this study that included outcome constructs of Intentions to engage in and actual bone health Behaviors (calcium and vitamin D intake and physical activity) with independent variables of positive or negative Attitudes, perception of social pressure (Subjective Norms), and perceived ease or difficulty in performing bone health behaviors (Perceived Behavioral Control [PBC]). Methods/Proposed Study Design: A longitudinal repeated measures experimental design was used. One hundred fifty women were randomly assigned to a comparison group (n=75 receiving bone health information) or to an intervention group (n=75 receiving DXA and bone health information). Baseline demographic data were collected; the Prevention Intentions Questionnaire using TPB constructs, and a Behaviors Scale was developed and administered to all participants at baseline, at two weeks, and at two months after interventions. Results: Thirty-two percent of women in the intervention group had low bone density. Intentions: ANOVA found a near-significant interaction effect F (1.57, 228.72) = 2.927, p = .068 and a significant time effect F(1.57, 228.72) = 35.55, p &lt; .001. Behaviors: Significant interaction effect for physical activity F(1.86, 273.76) = 6.124, p = .003, significant time effect for vitamin D F(1.60, 235.20) = 17.53, p &lt; .001, and a near-significant interaction between Calcium and Group F(1.89, 277.27) = 3.06, p = .052. &nbsp;Correlation found an inverse relationship between Intentions and DXA scores r(74) = -.23, p = .046 at two weeks, and between vitamin D intake and DXA scores r(73) = -.25, p = .03 at two months. Regression found Attitudes contributed significantly in comparison and intervention models at two weeks and at two months; PBC contributed significantly in comparison groups at both time-points; Subjective Norms negatively contributed (Beta = -.23) toward Intentions in the two week comparison group model, R squared = .49, F(1,69) = 59.30, p = .03. The two month comparison group model accounted for 62.0% of the variance in Intentions R squared = .62, F(1,67) = 99.19, p = .04. Intentions significantly correlated with calcium intake r(147) = .40, &lt; .01, vitamin D intake r(147) = .44, &lt; .01, and sports activity r(147) = .33, &lt; .05, throughout the study. Implications for Nursing: Early detection and intervention in perimenopausal bone loss may reduce osteoporosis morbidity and may impact women's quality of life, reduce financial consequences to individuals, families, communities, and the nation. &nbsp;Bone density testing in pre- and perimenopausal women as an intervention holds promise as a way to reduce osteoporosis morbidity for aging women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:42:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:42:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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