2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157254
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Incorporating Environmental Risk Reduction in Public Health Nursing Practice
Abstract:
Incorporating Environmental Risk Reduction in Public Health Nursing Practice
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Postma, Julie, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington School of Nursing, Department of Family and Child Nursing
Title:Post doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:14327 26th Ave. NE, Seattle, WA, 98125, USA
Contact Telephone:206-245-9141
Co-Authors:Patricia Butterfield, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dean and Professor; Elizabeth Tinker, MN, MPH, Personal Health Services Supervisor
Purpose and Aims: The purpose of this conceptually-guided study was to identify factors that contributed to and detracted from public health nurses (PHNs) delivering environmental risk reduction (ER) interventions in the home setting. In particular, this study explored the readiness, acceptance, and confidence level of PHNs in the delivery of ER strategies to low-income, rural residents in their homes. Background: Through existing public health programs, PHNs are frequently in clients' homes, providing an assessment window into household characteristics that affect children's environmental health (EH) risks. Home visitation programs are an effective mechanism to provide parental education, social support, and resource referral and have resulted in sustained and multi-dimensional improvements in children's health. Cross-training nurses to provide basic EH services is a concept that is just beginning to receive consideration within local health departments. However, little is known about how nurses view, understand, perceive of, and deliver EH education and advocacy as part of their practice. As with any new and expanding role, issues surrounding training, development, organizational and resource support, and acceptability should be explored from the vantage of the nurse. Methods: Structured one-on-one interviews were conducted with PHNs that were delivering an ER intervention in a randomized clinical trial. Ten PHNs from two county health departments in the Western United States were interviewed. Grounded theory principles guided the analytic process. Results: Barriers to incorporating ER in PHN practice included: a change in the perceived mission of public health, a lack of EH training, the absence of a strong relationship between PHN and EH services, the multidimensional roles of PHNs, the presentation of nurse participation by management, incorporating research families into full work schedules, and the difficulty with engaging parents in EH. Facilitators included: on-the-job training and support, opportunity for capacity building, belief that EH messages will help the community, potential to increase PHN visibility, and personal interest. Implications: Adapting PHN practice to include ER strategies is feasible, but not without challenges. With adequate training, time, and institutional support, multiple challenges can be overcome. PHNs are well positioned to improve the health of families and communities by integrating ER into their scope of practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIncorporating Environmental Risk Reduction in Public Health Nursing Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157254-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Incorporating Environmental Risk Reduction in Public Health Nursing Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Postma, Julie, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington School of Nursing, Department of Family and Child Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">14327 26th Ave. NE, Seattle, WA, 98125, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-245-9141</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jmpostma@u.washington.edu, jpostma@wsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patricia Butterfield, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dean and Professor; Elizabeth Tinker, MN, MPH, Personal Health Services Supervisor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose and Aims: The purpose of this conceptually-guided study was to identify factors that contributed to and detracted from public health nurses (PHNs) delivering environmental risk reduction (ER) interventions in the home setting. In particular, this study explored the readiness, acceptance, and confidence level of PHNs in the delivery of ER strategies to low-income, rural residents in their homes. Background: Through existing public health programs, PHNs are frequently in clients' homes, providing an assessment window into household characteristics that affect children's environmental health (EH) risks. Home visitation programs are an effective mechanism to provide parental education, social support, and resource referral and have resulted in sustained and multi-dimensional improvements in children's health. Cross-training nurses to provide basic EH services is a concept that is just beginning to receive consideration within local health departments. However, little is known about how nurses view, understand, perceive of, and deliver EH education and advocacy as part of their practice. As with any new and expanding role, issues surrounding training, development, organizational and resource support, and acceptability should be explored from the vantage of the nurse. Methods: Structured one-on-one interviews were conducted with PHNs that were delivering an ER intervention in a randomized clinical trial. Ten PHNs from two county health departments in the Western United States were interviewed. Grounded theory principles guided the analytic process. Results: Barriers to incorporating ER in PHN practice included: a change in the perceived mission of public health, a lack of EH training, the absence of a strong relationship between PHN and EH services, the multidimensional roles of PHNs, the presentation of nurse participation by management, incorporating research families into full work schedules, and the difficulty with engaging parents in EH. Facilitators included: on-the-job training and support, opportunity for capacity building, belief that EH messages will help the community, potential to increase PHN visibility, and personal interest. Implications: Adapting PHN practice to include ER strategies is feasible, but not without challenges. With adequate training, time, and institutional support, multiple challenges can be overcome. PHNs are well positioned to improve the health of families and communities by integrating ER into their scope of practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:42:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:42:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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