2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157257
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of RN-BSN Education: Comparison of Two University Programs
Abstract:
Evaluation of RN-BSN Education: Comparison of Two University Programs
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Rector, Cherie, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:California State University, Bakersfield, Nursing
Title:Professor
Contact Address:15965 Ave. 309, Visalia, CA, 93292, USA
Contact Telephone:559-734-1845
Co-Authors:Kathleen Gilchrist, PhD, FNP-C, CCRN, Professor; Kristine Warner, PhD, MPH, RN, Associate Professor
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare and contrast RN-BSN program evaluations at two California State Universities to increase student satisfaction/completion. Background: One program, CSU Chico, is offered solely online, and the other program, CSU Bakersfield, consists of a mixture of on-campus, Instructional Television (ITV) and online or WebCT-enhanced courses. Individual program evaluations are commonly done. Description: A 13-item survey asked about overall student experiences and prompted more specific replies including: community health nursing experiences and preparation, most helpful/least-helpful classes or experiences, perceived barriers/facilitators and hours worked, as well as suggested changes. Online evaluations (using Survey Monkey) were completed by RN-BSN graduates at both universities. Emails were sent to 60 CSU Bakersfield and 40 CSU Chico RN-BSN graduates. A total of 12 email addresses were no longer valid (4 CSUB/8 CSUC). Responses were received from a total of 31 graduates (18 CSUB/13 CSUC) for an overall response rate of 35% (32% CSUB and 40.6% CSUC). Outcomes: The majority of graduates reported a good overall experience (54.8%), with the most frequently cited reason for success as supportive faculty and helpful advising. Community Health Nursing courses were noted as the most helpful (61.2%), along with Senior Practicum (19.3%) and Pathophysiology (16.1%) courses. Few graduates highlighted courses as "least helpful" (<17%), and 42% stated that faculty support helped the most to facilitate their progress in the programs. Almost 26% reported that self-motivation or commitment was "most helpful", and 16% indicated that online and ITV classes were beneficial. Few graduates cited barriers, however, 12.9% mentioned technical problems, and almost 10% experienced a lack of student support/isolation or problems with the schedule/configuration of courses. Lack of online upper division courses outside of nursing was a difficulty for 29% of graduates, and 16.1% reported a burden with the amount of class work required. More than one-third of respondents stated no program changes were required, and over 19% found flexible hours in the Community Health Nursing clinical course the most helpful thing about the public health experience. Home visitation and caseloads, along with working in their own communities, were also cited, along with preceptors (12.9% for each). The majority of graduates worked full-time during their course of study (55.6% CSUB and 61.5% CSUC worked between 31-40 hours/week). Conclusions: Individual programs can benefit from program comparisons that may illuminate further areas of needed improvement that are not always readily apparent in a standard program evaluation. Nurse educators need to find innovative ways to facilitate RN-BSN education and remove barriers, even with flexible online programs. The most important factor identified by RN-BSN students was supportive faculty and advisors. Faculty mentors who took the time to assist RN-BSN students with educational and career planning and helped them navigate the university systems were vital to student success.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of RN-BSN Education: Comparison of Two University Programsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157257-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluation of RN-BSN Education: Comparison of Two University Programs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rector, Cherie, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">California State University, Bakersfield, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">15965 Ave. 309, Visalia, CA, 93292, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">559-734-1845</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">crector@csub.edu, cherierector@yahoo.om</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathleen Gilchrist, PhD, FNP-C, CCRN, Professor; Kristine Warner, PhD, MPH, RN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare and contrast RN-BSN program evaluations at two California State Universities to increase student satisfaction/completion. Background: One program, CSU Chico, is offered solely online, and the other program, CSU Bakersfield, consists of a mixture of on-campus, Instructional Television (ITV) and online or WebCT-enhanced courses. Individual program evaluations are commonly done. Description: A 13-item survey asked about overall student experiences and prompted more specific replies including: community health nursing experiences and preparation, most helpful/least-helpful classes or experiences, perceived barriers/facilitators and hours worked, as well as suggested changes. Online evaluations (using Survey Monkey) were completed by RN-BSN graduates at both universities. Emails were sent to 60 CSU Bakersfield and 40 CSU Chico RN-BSN graduates. A total of 12 email addresses were no longer valid (4 CSUB/8 CSUC). Responses were received from a total of 31 graduates (18 CSUB/13 CSUC) for an overall response rate of 35% (32% CSUB and 40.6% CSUC). Outcomes: The majority of graduates reported a good overall experience (54.8%), with the most frequently cited reason for success as supportive faculty and helpful advising. Community Health Nursing courses were noted as the most helpful (61.2%), along with Senior Practicum (19.3%) and Pathophysiology (16.1%) courses. Few graduates highlighted courses as &quot;least helpful&quot; (&lt;17%), and 42% stated that faculty support helped the most to facilitate their progress in the programs. Almost 26% reported that self-motivation or commitment was &quot;most helpful&quot;, and 16% indicated that online and ITV classes were beneficial. Few graduates cited barriers, however, 12.9% mentioned technical problems, and almost 10% experienced a lack of student support/isolation or problems with the schedule/configuration of courses. Lack of online upper division courses outside of nursing was a difficulty for 29% of graduates, and 16.1% reported a burden with the amount of class work required. More than one-third of respondents stated no program changes were required, and over 19% found flexible hours in the Community Health Nursing clinical course the most helpful thing about the public health experience. Home visitation and caseloads, along with working in their own communities, were also cited, along with preceptors (12.9% for each). The majority of graduates worked full-time during their course of study (55.6% CSUB and 61.5% CSUC worked between 31-40 hours/week). Conclusions: Individual programs can benefit from program comparisons that may illuminate further areas of needed improvement that are not always readily apparent in a standard program evaluation. Nurse educators need to find innovative ways to facilitate RN-BSN education and remove barriers, even with flexible online programs. The most important factor identified by RN-BSN students was supportive faculty and advisors. Faculty mentors who took the time to assist RN-BSN students with educational and career planning and helped them navigate the university systems were vital to student success.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:42:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:42:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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