Online Fathering: The Experience of First-Time Fatherhood in Combat-Deployed Troops

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157258
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Online Fathering: The Experience of First-Time Fatherhood in Combat-Deployed Troops
Abstract:
Online Fathering: The Experience of First-Time Fatherhood in Combat-Deployed Troops
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Schachman, Kathleen A., PhD, FNP-BC, PNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University, Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:PO Box 173560, 215 Sherrick Hall, Bozeman, MT, 59717-3560, USA
Contact Telephone:406-994-2705
Background: Paternal involvement during childbirth has been shown to facilitate the childbirth process, enhance parental feelings of self-worth, strengthen the couple relationship, and foster paternal role attainment (Barclay & Lupton, 1999; Callister, Matsumura, & Julkunen, 2003). In Western society, most expectant fathers plan to accompany their partners during childbirth, and expect to be active participants in the childbirth process. Each year thousands of fathers are absent during this important life transition due to military deployment to combat regions. Yet no studies have been conducted that investigate how this population experiences new fatherhood. Objective: The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the lived experience of first-time fatherhood from the unique perspective of military men who are deployed to combat regions during birth. Methods: A phenomenological approach was used to investigate first-time fatherhood in combat-deployed troops. Seventeen men who were stationed in Okinawa Japan and had recently returned from combat deployments were recruited for this study. Unstructured, in-depth interviews were conducted six to 12 weeks after birth. Participants were asked what it was like to become a father while deployed overseas to a combat region. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using Colaizzi's (1978) method. Results: The overarching theme was "Disruption of the protector/provider role" with six categories emerging: (1) "worry, then relief", (2) "lost opportunity", (3) "guilt", (4) "fear of death and dismemberment", and (5) "pride and joy".  The sixth and final category "communication: the ties that bind" highlighted the role of online communication with their partner (e.g. e-mail, instant messaging, Facebook, blogs, and chat rooms) in restoring balance to the protector/provider role. Implications: This study provides insight for military nurses and the interdisciplinary health care team into the needs of first-time fathers who are combat-deployed during the birth of their baby. Understanding these experiences helps the military health care team offer targeted support and communication access for deployed fathers. In addition, this information can set the stage for a healthy reunion, which may take place at military bases and within communities across the globe, and thus is of benefit to all nurses working with military families.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOnline Fathering: The Experience of First-Time Fatherhood in Combat-Deployed Troopsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157258-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Online Fathering: The Experience of First-Time Fatherhood in Combat-Deployed Troops</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schachman, Kathleen A., PhD, FNP-BC, PNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 173560, 215 Sherrick Hall, Bozeman, MT, 59717-3560, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406-994-2705</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kathleen.schachman@montana.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Paternal involvement during childbirth has been shown to facilitate the childbirth process, enhance parental feelings of self-worth, strengthen the couple relationship, and foster paternal role attainment (Barclay &amp; Lupton, 1999; Callister, Matsumura, &amp; Julkunen, 2003). In Western society, most expectant fathers plan to accompany their partners during childbirth, and expect to be active participants in the childbirth process. Each year thousands of fathers are absent during this important life transition due to military deployment to combat regions. Yet no studies have been conducted that investigate how this population experiences new fatherhood. Objective: The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the lived experience of first-time fatherhood from the unique perspective of military men who are deployed to combat regions during birth.&nbsp;Methods: A phenomenological approach was used to investigate first-time fatherhood in combat-deployed troops. Seventeen men who were stationed in Okinawa Japan and had recently returned from combat deployments were recruited for this study. Unstructured, in-depth interviews were conducted six to 12 weeks after birth. Participants were asked what it was like to become a father while deployed overseas to a combat region. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using Colaizzi's (1978) method. Results: The overarching theme was &quot;Disruption of the protector/provider role&quot; with six categories emerging: (1) &quot;worry, then relief&quot;, (2) &quot;lost opportunity&quot;, (3) &quot;guilt&quot;, (4) &quot;fear of death and dismemberment&quot;, and (5) &quot;pride and joy&quot;.&nbsp; The sixth and final category &quot;communication: the ties that bind&quot; highlighted the role of online communication with their partner (e.g. e-mail, instant messaging, Facebook, blogs, and chat rooms) in restoring balance to the protector/provider role. Implications: This study provides insight for military nurses and the interdisciplinary health care team into the needs of first-time fathers who are combat-deployed during the birth of their baby. Understanding these experiences helps the military health care team offer targeted support and communication access for deployed fathers. In addition, this information can set the stage for a healthy reunion, which may take place at military bases and within communities across the globe, and thus is of benefit to all nurses working with military families.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:42:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:42:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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