2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157260
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Perception of Aging Successfully in Older Adults
Abstract:
Self-Perception of Aging Successfully in Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Silva-Smith, Amy, PhD, APRN, BC, ANP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:1420 Austin Bluffs Parkway, PO Box 7150, Colorado Springs, CO, 80933, USA
Contact Telephone:719-255-4490
Purpose: The purpose of this research was to answer the following questions: (1) Which demographic variables are associated with higher scores on the self-report of aging successfully?, (2) Which healthy behaviors predict higher scores on the self-report of aging successfully?, and (3) Do higher scores on the self-perception of aging successfully predict participation in preventive screening and immunizations? Background: Successful aging research, as it relates to clinically important outcomes, is interwoven with variables associated with health promotion and disease prevention. However, authors who have tested interventions related to disease prevention have reported variability in the willingness of older adults to participate in primary prevention strategies such as dietary restriction. It remains unclear whether there are relationships between older adults' self-perception of whether or not they are aging successfully and their choices to participate in healthy behaviors and preventive screening. By understanding these relationships, health care providers and researchers may be more able to construct interventions that encourage and support older adults' participation. Methods: This study used a survey design. Healthy behaviors and prevention strategies were selected based on research that reported strategies that contribute to healthy aging and current clinical guidelines. Self-perception of aging successfully was measured using two items; one Likert scale and the other interval scale. The sample for this study was 205 adults between the age of 60 and 95 (x=70.51; SD=7.682). Data analyses used were frequencies, descriptive statistics, Pearson r correlation, Spearman rho correlation, ANOVA, and linear regression. Results: Significant correlations were found between successful aging and age, race, income, and employment status. The health behaviors alcohol consumption, breakfast, and exercise were significant predictors of self-perception of aging successfully. Preventive screening examinations that were positively correlated with self-perception of aging successfully were skin and dental exams. Higher scores on self-perception of aging successfully predicted participation in screening tests taken as a whole. Limitations of this study are reviewed. Implications: Findings from this study provide insight into relationships and predictors of variables related to self-perception of aging successfully and older adults' choices to participate in healthy behaviors and prevention. Additional research is needed to continue to develop a model to explain the variables that contribute to and predict successful aging in older adults; not just from the perspective of researchers and health care providers but from that of the older adults themselves.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Perception of Aging Successfully in Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157260-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-Perception of Aging Successfully in Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Silva-Smith, Amy, PhD, APRN, BC, ANP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1420 Austin Bluffs Parkway, PO Box 7150, Colorado Springs, CO, 80933, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">719-255-4490</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">asilvasm@uccs.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this research was to answer the following questions: (1) Which demographic variables are associated with higher scores on the self-report of aging successfully?, (2) Which healthy behaviors predict higher scores on the self-report of aging successfully?, and (3) Do higher scores on the self-perception of aging successfully predict participation in preventive screening and immunizations? Background: Successful aging research, as it relates to clinically important outcomes, is interwoven with variables associated with health promotion and disease prevention. However, authors who have tested interventions related to disease prevention have reported variability in the willingness of older adults to participate in primary prevention strategies such as dietary restriction. It remains unclear whether there are relationships between older adults' self-perception of whether or not they are aging successfully and their choices to participate in healthy behaviors and preventive screening. By understanding these relationships, health care providers and researchers may be more able to construct interventions that encourage and support older adults' participation. Methods: This study used a survey design. Healthy behaviors and prevention strategies were selected based on research that reported strategies that contribute to healthy aging and current clinical guidelines. Self-perception of aging successfully was measured using two items; one Likert scale and the other interval scale. The sample for this study was 205 adults between the age of 60 and 95 (x=70.51; SD=7.682). Data analyses used were frequencies, descriptive statistics, Pearson r correlation, Spearman rho correlation, ANOVA, and linear regression. Results: Significant correlations were found between successful aging and age, race, income, and employment status. The health behaviors alcohol consumption, breakfast, and exercise were significant predictors of self-perception of aging successfully. Preventive screening examinations that were positively correlated with self-perception of aging successfully were skin and dental exams. Higher scores on self-perception of aging successfully predicted participation in screening tests taken as a whole. Limitations of this study are reviewed. Implications: Findings from this study provide insight into relationships and predictors of variables related to self-perception of aging successfully and older adults' choices to participate in healthy behaviors and prevention. Additional research is needed to continue to develop a model to explain the variables that contribute to and predict successful aging in older adults; not just from the perspective of researchers and health care providers but from that of the older adults themselves.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:42:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:42:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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