2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157262
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessing Evidence-Based Practice Readiness of Rural Nurses
Abstract:
Assessing Evidence-Based Practice Readiness of Rural Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Thompson, Cathy J., PhD, RN, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Denver, College of Nursing, Division of Adult and Senior Health
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:13120 East 19th Ave., Room 4211, Mail Stop C288-19, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA
Contact Telephone:719-873-5623
Purposes/Aims: The purpose of this paper is to describe factors influencing the readiness of rural nurses for evidence-based practice. Background: Evidence-based practice (EBP) has become the prevailing paradigm of clinical decision-making and effectiveness in the health sciences. Rural hospitals are also implementing EBP often without the benefit of advanced practice nurses to promote this paradigm change. Certain personal, professional, and organizational factors are known to influence the use of research and evidence in practice. Methods: The data for this paper were collected as part of a larger study to comprehensively describe the role and function of the nurse opinion leader in rural practice. A descriptive, cross-sectional, survey design was employed. All staff nurses and nurse managers in 4 rural hospitals in X were invited to participate in the major study. Two research instruments were initially distributed; data from the Research Factor Questionnaire-Evidence-Based Practice (RFQ-EBP) are presented for this paper. The RFQ-EBP provides data regarding the internal and external factors known to influence the use of research and evidence findings in practice. Results: Data from a total of 63 nurses from three institutions are included in this report. The average participant was a 45 year-old female, Caucasian, working fulltime as a staff RN, who reads professional literature about 2 hours/week. The median length of time as an RN in their facility was 8.5 years; the median length of time as an RN was 13.5 years.  These subjects had heard of EBP (89%) and most wanted to learn more about EBP (86%). Very positive attitudes towards EBP were determined by a semantic differential scale score of 6.29 on a scale of 1-7. The majority of nurses discussed research/evidence findings to a moderate to large extent with fellow staff nurses, physicians, and nurse managers, respectively. Seventy-nine to 90% of participants believed that communication channels influenced their attitude and use of evidence in practice. Organizational factors related to promoting a positive research culture were rated low to moderate on a 1-5 scale. Implications: Assessing these factors known to influence research use will aid nursing administrators in the rural setting to determine the readiness of nursing staff and the need for institution-specific strategies to successfully implement and sustain the EBP paradigm. The results from this survey show a positive outlook among rural nurses toward the acceptance of EBP, however rural settings lack infrastructure to sustain EBP changes. Nurse administrators can use these findings to tailor educational and institutional strategies to promote nurses? acceptance and use of research and evidence findings into practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessing Evidence-Based Practice Readiness of Rural Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157262-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Assessing Evidence-Based Practice Readiness of Rural Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thompson, Cathy J., PhD, RN, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Denver, College of Nursing, Division of Adult and Senior Health</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">13120 East 19th Ave., Room 4211, Mail Stop C288-19, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">719-873-5623</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cathy.thompson@ucdenver.edu, cathyj.thompson@hotma</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: The purpose of this paper is to describe factors influencing the readiness of rural nurses for evidence-based practice. Background: Evidence-based practice (EBP) has become the prevailing paradigm of clinical decision-making and effectiveness in the health sciences. Rural hospitals are also implementing EBP often without the benefit of advanced practice nurses to promote this paradigm change. Certain personal, professional, and organizational factors are known to influence the use of research and evidence in practice. Methods: The data for this paper were collected as part of a larger study to comprehensively describe the role and function of the nurse opinion leader in rural practice. A descriptive, cross-sectional, survey design was employed. All staff nurses and nurse managers in 4 rural hospitals in X were invited to participate in the major study. Two research instruments were initially distributed; data from the Research Factor Questionnaire-Evidence-Based Practice (RFQ-EBP) are presented for this paper. The RFQ-EBP provides data regarding the internal and external factors known to influence the use of research and evidence findings in practice. Results: Data from a total of 63 nurses from three institutions are included in this report. The average participant was a 45 year-old female, Caucasian, working fulltime as a staff RN, who reads professional literature about 2 hours/week. The median length of time as an RN in their facility was 8.5 years; the median length of time as an RN was 13.5 years.&nbsp; These subjects had heard of EBP (89%) and most wanted to learn more about EBP (86%). Very positive attitudes towards EBP were determined by a semantic differential scale score of 6.29 on a scale of 1-7. The majority of nurses discussed research/evidence findings to a moderate to large extent with fellow staff nurses, physicians, and nurse managers, respectively. Seventy-nine to 90% of participants believed that communication channels influenced their attitude and use of evidence in practice. Organizational factors related to promoting a positive research culture were rated low to moderate on a 1-5 scale. Implications: Assessing these factors known to influence research use will aid nursing administrators in the rural setting to determine the readiness of nursing staff and the need for institution-specific strategies to successfully implement and sustain the EBP paradigm. The results from this survey show a positive outlook among rural nurses toward the acceptance of EBP, however rural settings lack infrastructure to sustain EBP changes. Nurse administrators can use these findings to tailor educational and institutional strategies to promote nurses? acceptance and use of research and evidence findings into practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:42:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:42:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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