2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157263
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Libby Asbestos Health Status Study: Context & Concern
Abstract:
The Libby Asbestos Health Status Study: Context & Concern
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Winters, Charlene A., PhD, ACNS-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University, College of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:32 Campus Drive #7416, Missoula, MT, 59812-7416, USA
Contact Telephone:406-243-4608
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of the study was to establish a more comprehensive understanding of the bio-psychosocial health status and health service needs of a national cohort of persons exposed to Libby amphibole asbestos. Specific aims were to (a) examine the severity of chronic illness, depression, acceptance of illness, and stress; (b) explore the associations among these variables; and (c) evaluate access, availability, convenience, and financial aspects of care among a national cohort. In this paper, the environmental disaster will be described and the study introduced. Background: Decades of mining, disposal of asbestos-containing waste materials, and use of vermiculite products contaminated the community of Libby, Montana and processing facilities around the country. In 1999, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) began an investigation of asbestos contamination and high rates of asbestos-related disease (ARD) in this rural community. A mortality review (1979-1998) by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry in 2002 reported deaths from asbestosis in Libby to be 40 and 60 times higher than the rest of Montana and the US, respectively. The EPA designated Libby an asbestos Superfund site in 2002. Exposure to asbestos is linked to significant pulmonary insult and injury. However, little is known about the psychosocial impacts of ARD. Methods: Community-based participatory research principals were used to accomplish the study aims. Participants were local and distant patients of the Center for Asbestos Related Disease (CARD) in Libby, Montana, who were 21 years of age and older, proficient in English, with a history of exposure to Libby amphibole asbestos. Clinical and psychosocial data were collected and analyzed to examine differences between groups, relationships among the bio-psychosocial indicators of health, and financial aspects of care. Results: Clinical and survey data were collected from 361 local and 163 distant patients of the CARD clinic. The majority were married (64%) men (54%) living within the Libby city limits (64%) with a mean age of 59.47 years (range=28-80 years; sd=10). Contact with the contaminated vermiculite came from insulation (54%), shoveling (38%), tilling (41%), gardening (45%), work in the attic (26%), or removal (10%); 35% of study participants were household contact or family member of a vermiculite worker. Implications: Implications for nursing include risk reduction strategies and safe handling practices for vermiculite workers, family contacts, and community residents.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Libby Asbestos Health Status Study: Context & Concernen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157263-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Libby Asbestos Health Status Study: Context &amp; Concern</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Winters, Charlene A., PhD, ACNS-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">32 Campus Drive #7416, Missoula, MT, 59812-7416, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406-243-4608</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">winters@montana.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The purpose of the study was to establish a more comprehensive understanding of the bio-psychosocial health status and health service needs of a national cohort of persons exposed to Libby amphibole asbestos. Specific aims were to (a) examine the severity of chronic illness, depression, acceptance of illness, and stress; (b) explore the associations among these variables; and (c) evaluate access, availability, convenience, and financial aspects of care among a national cohort. In this paper, the environmental disaster will be described and the study introduced. Background: Decades of mining, disposal of asbestos-containing waste materials, and use of vermiculite products contaminated the community of Libby, Montana and processing facilities around the country. In 1999, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) began an investigation of asbestos contamination and high rates of asbestos-related disease (ARD) in this rural community. A mortality review (1979-1998) by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry in 2002 reported deaths from asbestosis in Libby to be 40 and 60 times higher than the rest of Montana and the US, respectively. The EPA designated Libby an asbestos Superfund site in 2002. Exposure to asbestos is linked to significant pulmonary insult and injury. However, little is known about the psychosocial impacts of ARD. Methods: Community-based participatory research principals were used to accomplish the study aims. Participants were local and distant patients of the Center for Asbestos Related Disease (CARD) in Libby, Montana, who were 21 years of age and older, proficient in English, with a history of exposure to Libby amphibole asbestos. Clinical and psychosocial data were collected and analyzed to examine differences between groups, relationships among the bio-psychosocial indicators of health, and financial aspects of care. Results: Clinical and survey data were collected from 361 local and 163 distant patients of the CARD clinic. The majority were married (64%) men (54%) living within the Libby city limits (64%) with a mean age of 59.47 years (range=28-80 years; sd=10). Contact with the contaminated vermiculite came from insulation (54%), shoveling (38%), tilling (41%), gardening (45%), work in the attic (26%), or removal (10%); 35% of study participants were household contact or family member of a vermiculite worker. Implications: Implications for nursing include risk reduction strategies and safe handling practices for vermiculite workers, family contacts, and community residents.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:42:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:42:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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