2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157264
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Strength of Tobacco Control in Rural Communities
Abstract:
Strength of Tobacco Control in Rural Communities
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:York, Nancy L., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Physiologic Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor of Nursing
Contact Address:4505 Maryland Parkway, PO Box 453018, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA
Contact Telephone:702-895-5930
Co-Authors:Ellen J. Hahn, DNS, RN, Alumni Professor; Lisa Jones; Mary Kay Rayens, PhD, Professor; Mei Zhang
Purpose.  The study aimed to: (a) describe strength of tobacco control (SoTC) capacity, efforts and resources in rural communities; and (b) examine the relationships between SoTC and its constructs and sociodemographic and political factors. Background.  Smoking rates are generally higher in rural vs. urban communities. The SoTC measure was initially developed to evaluate the effectiveness of state level tobacco control efforts. Although the SoTC has not been used at the local level, there is a need to evaluate local tobacco control measures in order to tailor approaches to reduce tobacco use in rural communities. Methods.  The data were collected during the baseline, pre-intervention phase of a community-based randomized, controlled trial to promote smoke-free policy. Stratified random sampling of rural communities was used (n = 39). Key informant interviews were employed with the local tobacco control specialist from the health department. The SoTC was adapted to a county-level measure assessing three key constructs: (a) Capacity, the ability to implement tobacco control activities given sufficient resources; (b) Efforts, the comprehensiveness of tobacco control activities; and (c) Resources, assets committed to tobacco control. The SoTC constructs and total score were standardized with mean=0 and SD=1. Univariate analysis and bivariate correlations were used to examine the overall SOTC summary score and construct scores, as well as their relationships. Multiple regression examined the relationship of county-level sociodemographic and political variables with SOTC scores including population size, number of tobacco control staff per 10,000 population (tobacco staff ratio), and the Kentucky Institute of Medicine (KIM) ranking of county health characteristics. Results. Scores ranged from -2.5 to 1.7 for Capacity; -1.8 to 2.5 for Efforts; -2.9 to 2.9 for Resources; and -2.7 to 2.7 for the total score (mean = 0; SD = 1 for each). County population size was positively correlated with Capacity (r=0.35; p=.02), Efforts (r=0.54; p<.01) and the SoTC total score (r=0.47; p<.01). The higher the tobacco staff ratio, the lower the Capacity for tobacco control (r= -.32; p=.04). Communities with more Resources for tobacco control had better overall county health rankings, as reported by the KIM (r=.41; p<.01) Population size was the strongest predictor for Capacity, Efforts and the SoTC total score; the regression model for Resources was not significant overall. Implications.  SoTC scores are valuable in determining local level tobacco control efforts and appropriate planning for additional public health interventions and resources.  Dissemination of the aggregate SoTC results to communities will help local and state leaders address tobacco control more effectively.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStrength of Tobacco Control in Rural Communitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157264-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Strength of Tobacco Control in Rural Communities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">York, Nancy L., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Physiologic Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4505 Maryland Parkway, PO Box 453018, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">702-895-5930</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nancy.york@unlv.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ellen J. Hahn, DNS, RN, Alumni Professor; Lisa Jones; Mary Kay Rayens, PhD, Professor; Mei Zhang</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose.&nbsp; The study aimed to: (a) describe strength of tobacco control (SoTC) capacity, efforts and resources in rural communities; and (b) examine the relationships between SoTC and its constructs and sociodemographic and political factors. Background. &nbsp;Smoking rates are generally higher in rural vs. urban communities. The SoTC measure was initially developed to evaluate the effectiveness of state level tobacco control efforts. Although the SoTC has not been used at the local level, there is a need to evaluate local tobacco control measures in order to tailor approaches to reduce tobacco use in rural communities. Methods.&nbsp; The data were collected during the baseline, pre-intervention phase of a community-based randomized, controlled trial to promote smoke-free policy. Stratified random sampling of rural communities was used (n = 39). Key informant interviews were employed with the local tobacco control specialist from the health department. The SoTC was adapted to a county-level measure assessing three key constructs: (a) Capacity, the ability to implement tobacco control activities given sufficient resources; (b) Efforts, the comprehensiveness of tobacco control activities; and (c) Resources, assets committed to tobacco control. The SoTC constructs and total score were standardized with mean=0 and SD=1. Univariate analysis and bivariate correlations were used to examine the overall SOTC summary score and construct scores, as well as their relationships. Multiple regression examined the relationship of county-level sociodemographic and political variables with SOTC scores including population size, number of tobacco control staff per 10,000 population (tobacco staff ratio), and the Kentucky Institute of Medicine (KIM) ranking of county health characteristics. Results. Scores ranged from -2.5 to 1.7 for Capacity; -1.8 to 2.5 for Efforts; -2.9 to 2.9 for Resources; and -2.7 to 2.7 for the total score (mean = 0; SD = 1 for each). County population size was positively correlated with Capacity (r=0.35; p=.02), Efforts (r=0.54; p&lt;.01) and the SoTC total score (r=0.47; p&lt;.01). The higher the tobacco staff ratio, the lower the Capacity for tobacco control (r= -.32; p=.04). Communities with more Resources for tobacco control had better overall county health rankings, as reported by the KIM (r=.41; p&lt;.01) Population size was the strongest predictor for Capacity, Efforts and the SoTC total score; the regression model for Resources was not significant overall. Implications.&nbsp; SoTC scores are valuable in determining local level tobacco control efforts and appropriate planning for additional public health interventions and resources.&nbsp; Dissemination of the aggregate SoTC results to communities will help local and state leaders address tobacco control more effectively.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:42:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:42:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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