2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157266
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nutritional Status in a Senior Population: A Class Project
Abstract:
Nutritional Status in a Senior Population: A Class Project
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Zulkowski, Karen, DNS, RN, CWS
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University, Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:31 Snowy Lane, Red Lodge, MT, 59068, USA
Contact Telephone:406 671-2909
Co-Authors:A. Gretchen McNeely, DNSc, RN, Associate Dean and Associate Professor; Carol Moore, MN, RN, Adjunct Assistant Professor; Julie Pullen, MS, MSN, RN, LPC, NP-C, Adjunct Assistant Professor
Conducting a meaningful "hands-on" project as part of an undergraduate research course is challenging. Consequently, Fall semester 2008 we decided to conduct a project that would add needed geriatric contact and provide useful data on senior citizens in Billings, MT. The aims of this study were to (a) examine the relationship between sleep, depression, quality of life, and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) on nutritional status; (b) compare 2 nutritional instruments (Mini Nutritional Assessment [MNA] and Determine Your Nutritional Health) for percent at nutritional risk; and (c) examine which factors (sleep, depression, quality of life, and IADL) are most predictive of nutritional status in older adults. The 40 students enrolled in the research class were divided into 5 groups. Each group was given a topic and had to decide on a survey instrument. The instruments were compiled into a booklet and each of the second semester junior students enrolled in the class is currently collecting data from 8-10 persons over age 65 living in Billings, MT. This will result in a sample size of 320-400 persons. Class groups also had the responsibility to conduct literature reviews, complete and submit IRB forms, arrange for data collection sites, establish inter-rater reliability for class mates and enter data into statistical software. Data collection sites include senior citizen and assisted living centers, senior volunteers at local hospitals, and a local infusion therapy center. All work will be completed by December 2008. Data analysis will include use of descriptive statistics for demographic information and Pierson correlations for total scores by tool and individual items within each tool. T-tests will be used to look for differences in persons with and without nutritional deficiencies. Finally, tool results will be entered into a logistic regression to determine which items may be most predictive of nutritional deficiency in a senior population. Analysis and interruption of results will be done jointly between instructors and students. Results of this work will help students understand the research process as well as provide information important in practice. This is one way to translate research into practice in an undergraduate class. Further, results will help practicing nurses understand what types of factors may be impacting nutrition in their senior clients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNutritional Status in a Senior Population: A Class Projecten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157266-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nutritional Status in a Senior Population: A Class Project</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zulkowski, Karen, DNS, RN, CWS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">31 Snowy Lane, Red Lodge, MT, 59068, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406 671-2909</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">karenz@montana.edu, drkarenz@aol.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">A. Gretchen McNeely, DNSc, RN, Associate Dean and Associate Professor; Carol Moore, MN, RN, Adjunct Assistant Professor; Julie Pullen, MS, MSN, RN, LPC, NP-C, Adjunct Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Conducting a meaningful &quot;hands-on&quot; project as part of an undergraduate research course is challenging. Consequently, Fall semester 2008 we decided to conduct a project that would add needed geriatric contact and provide useful data on senior citizens in Billings, MT. The aims of this study were to (a) examine the relationship between sleep, depression, quality of life, and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) on nutritional status; (b) compare 2 nutritional instruments (Mini Nutritional Assessment [MNA] and Determine Your Nutritional Health) for percent at nutritional risk; and (c) examine which factors (sleep, depression, quality of life, and IADL) are most predictive of nutritional status in older adults. The 40 students enrolled in the research class were divided into 5 groups. Each group was given a topic and had to decide on a survey instrument. The instruments were compiled into a booklet and each of the second semester junior students enrolled in the class is currently collecting data from 8-10 persons over age 65 living in Billings, MT. This will result in a sample size of 320-400 persons. Class groups also had the responsibility to conduct literature reviews, complete and submit IRB forms, arrange for data collection sites, establish inter-rater reliability for class mates and enter data into statistical software. Data collection sites include senior citizen and assisted living centers, senior volunteers at local hospitals, and a local infusion therapy center. All work will be completed by December 2008. Data analysis will include use of descriptive statistics for demographic information and Pierson correlations for total scores by tool and individual items within each tool. T-tests will be used to look for differences in persons with and without nutritional deficiencies. Finally, tool results will be entered into a logistic regression to determine which items may be most predictive of nutritional deficiency in a senior population. Analysis and interruption of results will be done jointly between instructors and students. Results of this work will help students understand the research process as well as provide information important in practice. This is one way to translate research into practice in an undergraduate class. Further, results will help practicing nurses understand what types of factors may be impacting nutrition in their senior clients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:42:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:42:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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