AFRICAN AMERICAN MALES' GENETIC TESTING KNOWLEDGE AND WILLINGNESS TO PARTICIPATE

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157269
Type:
Presentation
Title:
AFRICAN AMERICAN MALES' GENETIC TESTING KNOWLEDGE AND WILLINGNESS TO PARTICIPATE
Abstract:
AFRICAN AMERICAN MALES' GENETIC TESTING KNOWLEDGE AND WILLINGNESS TO PARTICIPATE
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Bates, Mekeshia D., DNP, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Louis Stokes VA Medical Center
Title:National VA Quality Scholar
Contact Address:10701 East Boulevard, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Co-Authors:Mary T. Quinn Griffin; Cheryl Killion; Joyce Fitzpatrick
PURPOSE: To explore the knowledge of African American males towards genetic testing and their willingness to participate in genetic testing.
BACKGROUND: African American males are shown to have increased morbidity and mortality related to chronic diseases. The incidence of sickle cell disease, diabetes, stroke, and heart disease is much higher in African Americans than Caucasians. The impact of chronic diseases is even worse for African American men with 60% more likely to die from stroke, and 30% more likely to die from heart disease compared to White Americans. Recent advances have led to the association of specific gene sequences to certain chronic diseases. With further advances, application of genetic testing may change the approach to chronic diseases. No literature was found that examined African American males' knowledge about genetic testing and willingness to participate in genetic testing. Knowledge about genetic concepts and terminology may differ greatly in African Americans from other groups. It is crucial to ascertain a baseline knowledge level to identify need for education programs in this population.
METHODS: This was a descriptive study. A convenience sample of 105 self-identified African American males at least 18 years old were recruited from a national fraternity at one of its district meetings. Data were collected with a background, Survey, Factual and Perceived Genetic Knowledge Instruments, and Willingness to Participate in Genetic Testing Survey. Research packets were given to interested individuals at a designated conference booth. Subjects completed the anonymous surveys and returned them to the researcher in a sealed envelope.
RESULTS: The response rate was 99% (104/105). Participants had a mean age of 40.2 years (range 19-79). The majority was well-educated and 43% of all participants had at least one chronic illness. Although scores for perceived genetic knowledge were low, participants had a high level of factual genetic knowledge, with most knowledge about genes and disease. Participants knew most about using genetic testing for early detection (67%) and least about work penalty and genetic testing (25%). The total willingness to participate score was 46.8(SD +/- 15.3). A total of 63% of participants reported that they would be willing to participate in genetic testing now; however, when asked to participate based on who conducted the test, 47% would participate, and when the genetic testing task was considered, 61% would participate.
IMPLICATIONS: Information about African American malesÆ knowledge of genetic testing and willingness to participate in genetic testing will assist nurses in planning patient education programs about genetic testing. Research results will inform nursing practice related to caring for African American males with illnesses where genetic testing may be required. Interventions to educate participants on the specifics of genetic testing such as who is conducting the genetic testing and how the test will be performed may prove beneficial in increasing participants' willingness to have genetic testing. The results of this study may be used to guide faculty in developing genetic-related programs for nursing students. Furthermore these results may be used to formulate nursing policies related to incorporating genetic care into nursing practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAFRICAN AMERICAN MALES' GENETIC TESTING KNOWLEDGE AND WILLINGNESS TO PARTICIPATEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157269-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">AFRICAN AMERICAN MALES' GENETIC TESTING KNOWLEDGE AND WILLINGNESS TO PARTICIPATE</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bates, Mekeshia D., DNP, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Louis Stokes VA Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">National VA Quality Scholar</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10701 East Boulevard, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mekeshia.bates@va.gov</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary T. Quinn Griffin; Cheryl Killion; Joyce Fitzpatrick</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: To explore the knowledge of African American males towards genetic testing and their willingness to participate in genetic testing. <br/>BACKGROUND: African American males are shown to have increased morbidity and mortality related to chronic diseases. The incidence of sickle cell disease, diabetes, stroke, and heart disease is much higher in African Americans than Caucasians. The impact of chronic diseases is even worse for African American men with 60% more likely to die from stroke, and 30% more likely to die from heart disease compared to White Americans. Recent advances have led to the association of specific gene sequences to certain chronic diseases. With further advances, application of genetic testing may change the approach to chronic diseases. No literature was found that examined African American males' knowledge about genetic testing and willingness to participate in genetic testing. Knowledge about genetic concepts and terminology may differ greatly in African Americans from other groups. It is crucial to ascertain a baseline knowledge level to identify need for education programs in this population. <br/>METHODS: This was a descriptive study. A convenience sample of 105 self-identified African American males at least 18 years old were recruited from a national fraternity at one of its district meetings. Data were collected with a background, Survey, Factual and Perceived Genetic Knowledge Instruments, and Willingness to Participate in Genetic Testing Survey. Research packets were given to interested individuals at a designated conference booth. Subjects completed the anonymous surveys and returned them to the researcher in a sealed envelope.<br/>RESULTS: The response rate was 99% (104/105). Participants had a mean age of 40.2 years (range 19-79). The majority was well-educated and 43% of all participants had at least one chronic illness. Although scores for perceived genetic knowledge were low, participants had a high level of factual genetic knowledge, with most knowledge about genes and disease. Participants knew most about using genetic testing for early detection (67%) and least about work penalty and genetic testing (25%). The total willingness to participate score was 46.8(SD +/- 15.3). A total of 63% of participants reported that they would be willing to participate in genetic testing now; however, when asked to participate based on who conducted the test, 47% would participate, and when the genetic testing task was considered, 61% would participate. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Information about African American males&AElig; knowledge of genetic testing and willingness to participate in genetic testing will assist nurses in planning patient education programs about genetic testing. Research results will inform nursing practice related to caring for African American males with illnesses where genetic testing may be required. Interventions to educate participants on the specifics of genetic testing such as who is conducting the genetic testing and how the test will be performed may prove beneficial in increasing participants' willingness to have genetic testing. The results of this study may be used to guide faculty in developing genetic-related programs for nursing students. Furthermore these results may be used to formulate nursing policies related to incorporating genetic care into nursing practice.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:43:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:43:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.