2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157270
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE MEANING OF BEING IN ROMANTIC RELATIONSHIPS FOR AT-RISK YOUNG ADULT MALES
Abstract:
THE MEANING OF BEING IN ROMANTIC RELATIONSHIPS FOR AT-RISK YOUNG ADULT MALES
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Collins, Jennifer Lynn, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio
Title:Clinical Assistant Professor
Contact Address:7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX, 78229, USA
Co-Authors:Jane Dimmitt Champion
PURPOSES/AIMS:
This study explored the meaning of being in a romantic relationship for young adult males who are or have been in romantic relationships with African- and Mexican-American female adolescents with a history of STI, unplanned pregnancy, or abuse.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
The study of sexual risk behavior and outcomes of risk behavior has led to better understanding of the complex interactions at work in the romantic relationships of at-risk youth. However, few studies have addressed how influence over the course of an at-risk youth's life history has impacted the meaning assigned to being in a romantic relationship. Addressing the meaning of romantic relationships for at-risk youth beyond the level of risk behavior is important due to other norms at work in the presence of risk behavior.
METHODS:
A qualitative, phenomenologic approach was used. Participants completed two semi-structured interviews each. Interviews were conducted with six Mexican American and two African American young adult males 19 to 26 years of age using a life history perspective.
RESULTS:
Participants observed and listened to others throughout their lives to construct the meaning of being in a romantic relationship. Watching and learning from others was a sensory, intellectual and emotional experience. Some participants learned about relationship from the sensory experience of being physically abused, others learned in classroom environments about STI, still others learned from the ache in their hearts when they were neglected. At the extremes, participants valued their parents' loving relationships whereas others vowed not to repeat the violence or absence of parenting they witnessed in their lives.
IMPLICATIONS:
At-risk young adult males' romantic relationships include a struggle to balance physiological and psychological needs alongside the fulfillment of peer, family and other cultural norms. Nurses must recognize the effect of the interaction of multiple systems on young menÆs behavior, beliefs, and reaction to outcomes. Listening empathetically to another as a basic nursing process allows the opportunity to personalize care plans for individuals and their families. Nursing education must focus on curriculum content that teaches nurses cultural proficiency and empathetic listening skills to situate unwanted outcomes of romantic relationships such as STI and unplanned pregnancy in a larger context over the life course. Future nursing research must include an analysis of additional conceptualizations of romantic relationships for at-risk adult men beyond sexual risk behavior and adverse outcomes of such behavior.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE MEANING OF BEING IN ROMANTIC RELATIONSHIPS FOR AT-RISK YOUNG ADULT MALESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157270-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">THE MEANING OF BEING IN ROMANTIC RELATIONSHIPS FOR AT-RISK YOUNG ADULT MALES</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Collins, Jennifer Lynn, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX, 78229, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">collinsj2@uthscsa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jane Dimmitt Champion</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>This study explored the meaning of being in a romantic relationship for young adult males who are or have been in romantic relationships with African- and Mexican-American female adolescents with a history of STI, unplanned pregnancy, or abuse.<br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: <br/>The study of sexual risk behavior and outcomes of risk behavior has led to better understanding of the complex interactions at work in the romantic relationships of at-risk youth. However, few studies have addressed how influence over the course of an at-risk youth's life history has impacted the meaning assigned to being in a romantic relationship. Addressing the meaning of romantic relationships for at-risk youth beyond the level of risk behavior is important due to other norms at work in the presence of risk behavior.<br/>METHODS: <br/>A qualitative, phenomenologic approach was used. Participants completed two semi-structured interviews each. Interviews were conducted with six Mexican American and two African American young adult males 19 to 26 years of age using a life history perspective. <br/>RESULTS: <br/>Participants observed and listened to others throughout their lives to construct the meaning of being in a romantic relationship. Watching and learning from others was a sensory, intellectual and emotional experience. Some participants learned about relationship from the sensory experience of being physically abused, others learned in classroom environments about STI, still others learned from the ache in their hearts when they were neglected. At the extremes, participants valued their parents' loving relationships whereas others vowed not to repeat the violence or absence of parenting they witnessed in their lives.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: <br/>At-risk young adult males' romantic relationships include a struggle to balance physiological and psychological needs alongside the fulfillment of peer, family and other cultural norms. Nurses must recognize the effect of the interaction of multiple systems on young men&AElig;s behavior, beliefs, and reaction to outcomes. Listening empathetically to another as a basic nursing process allows the opportunity to personalize care plans for individuals and their families. Nursing education must focus on curriculum content that teaches nurses cultural proficiency and empathetic listening skills to situate unwanted outcomes of romantic relationships such as STI and unplanned pregnancy in a larger context over the life course. Future nursing research must include an analysis of additional conceptualizations of romantic relationships for at-risk adult men beyond sexual risk behavior and adverse outcomes of such behavior.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:43:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:43:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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