FOOD INTAKE AND DIETARY ACCULTURATIVE CHANGES OF FIRST GENERATION FILIPINO AMERICANS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157272
Type:
Presentation
Title:
FOOD INTAKE AND DIETARY ACCULTURATIVE CHANGES OF FIRST GENERATION FILIPINO AMERICANS
Abstract:
FOOD INTAKE AND DIETARY ACCULTURATIVE CHANGES OF FIRST GENERATION FILIPINO AMERICANS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:dela Cruz, Felicitas A., RN, DNSc, FAANP
P.I. Institution Name:Azusa Pacific University
Title:Professor and Director, Center for the Study of Health Disparities
Contact Address:901 E. Alosta Ave., Azusa, CA, 91702, USA
Co-Authors:Maria Brigette Lao-Nario
PURPOSE/AIMS: This pilot study (a) investigated the food intake of first generation Filipino Americans (FAs), their level of acculturation, and the acculturative changes in their dietary intake and practices, and (b) assessed their health status perceptions, and the state of their diet-related health indicators (BMI and hip-waist ratio).
BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that immigrants to the U.S. change their dietary intake, preferences and practices that impact their health status, giving rise to chronic health conditions such as hypertension and diabetes. Epidemiological studies show that FAs experience disparities with these health conditions. In spite of the tremendous increase in Filipino migration to the U.S. after 1965, these changes have been understudied in this ethnic/cultural group. METHODS: A convenience sample of 30 healthy FAs in Southern CA were interviewed to elicit their (a) 24-hour food intake, (b) level of acculturation, and (c) dietary changes and practices since migrating to the U.S., (d) health status perceptions, and socio-demographic characteristics. In addition, their height, weight, waist, and hip measurements were obtained. The theoretical framework used in this pilot study posits that food choice and dietary practices are influenced by three overlapping factors---factors related to food, person, and environment.
RESULTS: The sample consisted of predominantly female (66.6%), married, ranging in age from 27-71, having lived in the U.S. for more than 10 years. The sample represented the 3 major islands of the Philippines: 67% of the sample came from Luzon and the rest equally came from the Visayas and Mindanao. Most of them are currently working. Their overall acculturation level (mean= 2.85 SD =.54) shows that they are more Filipino than American, but leaning towards biculturalism. On the whole, the respondents eat traditional Filipino foods and three meals a dayùbreakfast, lunch, and dinnerùwith rice as a staple food, as well as snacks. However, 63% admitted that their dietary preferences and practices have changed since arrival in this country. Half of the respondents reported that they eat more meat, particularly steak which they rarely did before moving to the U.S.; slightly over 1/3 indicated that they eat more fruits and vegetables; 1/5 noted that they consume more milk and dairy products. The majority (63%) rated their health as very good. Their BMI ranged from 15.97-34.85 with a mean of 25 (SD=5). The mean waist-hip ratio was .94 (SD=.09) and .86 (SD=.05) for men and women, respectively.
IMPLICATIONS: The high intake of rice (food of high glycemic index, increased red meat and dairy intake, BMI, and waist-hip ratio of acculturating FAs might predispose them to certain dietary-related chronic illnesses. Nurse clinicians need to become aware not only of FA dietary changes and health-related indicators when counseling this ethnic group. Clinicians have to emphasize the importance of maintaining the healthful dietary aspectsùof consuming more fish, fruits, and vegetablesùin both the traditional Filipino diet and the American diet.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFOOD INTAKE AND DIETARY ACCULTURATIVE CHANGES OF FIRST GENERATION FILIPINO AMERICANSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157272-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">FOOD INTAKE AND DIETARY ACCULTURATIVE CHANGES OF FIRST GENERATION FILIPINO AMERICANS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">dela Cruz, Felicitas A., RN, DNSc, FAANP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Azusa Pacific University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Director, Center for the Study of Health Disparities</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">901 E. Alosta Ave., Azusa, CA, 91702, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">fdelacruz@apu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Maria Brigette Lao-Nario</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE/AIMS: This pilot study (a) investigated the food intake of first generation Filipino Americans (FAs), their level of acculturation, and the acculturative changes in their dietary intake and practices, and (b) assessed their health status perceptions, and the state of their diet-related health indicators (BMI and hip-waist ratio). <br/>BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that immigrants to the U.S. change their dietary intake, preferences and practices that impact their health status, giving rise to chronic health conditions such as hypertension and diabetes. Epidemiological studies show that FAs experience disparities with these health conditions. In spite of the tremendous increase in Filipino migration to the U.S. after 1965, these changes have been understudied in this ethnic/cultural group. METHODS: A convenience sample of 30 healthy FAs in Southern CA were interviewed to elicit their (a) 24-hour food intake, (b) level of acculturation, and (c) dietary changes and practices since migrating to the U.S., (d) health status perceptions, and socio-demographic characteristics. In addition, their height, weight, waist, and hip measurements were obtained. The theoretical framework used in this pilot study posits that food choice and dietary practices are influenced by three overlapping factors---factors related to food, person, and environment. <br/>RESULTS: The sample consisted of predominantly female (66.6%), married, ranging in age from 27-71, having lived in the U.S. for more than 10 years. The sample represented the 3 major islands of the Philippines: 67% of the sample came from Luzon and the rest equally came from the Visayas and Mindanao. Most of them are currently working. Their overall acculturation level (mean= 2.85 SD =.54) shows that they are more Filipino than American, but leaning towards biculturalism. On the whole, the respondents eat traditional Filipino foods and three meals a day&ugrave;breakfast, lunch, and dinner&ugrave;with rice as a staple food, as well as snacks. However, 63% admitted that their dietary preferences and practices have changed since arrival in this country. Half of the respondents reported that they eat more meat, particularly steak which they rarely did before moving to the U.S.; slightly over 1/3 indicated that they eat more fruits and vegetables; 1/5 noted that they consume more milk and dairy products. The majority (63%) rated their health as very good. Their BMI ranged from 15.97-34.85 with a mean of 25 (SD=5). The mean waist-hip ratio was .94 (SD=.09) and .86 (SD=.05) for men and women, respectively.<br/> IMPLICATIONS: The high intake of rice (food of high glycemic index, increased red meat and dairy intake, BMI, and waist-hip ratio of acculturating FAs might predispose them to certain dietary-related chronic illnesses. Nurse clinicians need to become aware not only of FA dietary changes and health-related indicators when counseling this ethnic group. Clinicians have to emphasize the importance of maintaining the healthful dietary aspects&ugrave;of consuming more fish, fruits, and vegetables&ugrave;in both the traditional Filipino diet and the American diet. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:43:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:43:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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