2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157273
Type:
Presentation
Title:
STRATEGIES USED BY PARENTS TO MANAGE FATIGUE IN CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES
Abstract:
STRATEGIES USED BY PARENTS TO MANAGE FATIGUE IN CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Eddy, Linda L., PhD, RN, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:14204 NE Salmon Creek Avenue, Vancouver, WA, 98686, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS:
The aims of this paper are to better understand the salience of fatigue for children and adolescents with disabilities and their families and to explore fatigue-management strategies identified by their parents.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
According to the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, fourteen percent of children in the United States are estimated to have special health care needs. Fatigue is one of the most common patient reported symptoms across a broad range of chronic diseases and conditions. However, little is known about fatigue in children with disabilities and even less about its management.
METHODS:
As part of a broader study of longitudinal patterns of pain and fatigue in children and adolescents with physical disabilities, ninety eight parents responded to a mailed survey about their child's chronic health problem. The survey, comprised of items from well-established tools, contained questions asking how much of a problem fatigue was for their child and how much their child's chronic health problem limited types of activities that they participated in or interrupted typical family activities. In addition, parents were asked to identify fatigue management strategies used in the home or in other settings. Nomination of commonly used strategies occurred both through forced choice questions as well as through an open-ended question that encouraged parents to identify other useful strategies. Descriptive statistics, correlations, and parametric and nonparametric group difference tests were used to analyze most survey questions. Content analysis was used to explore the open-ended question about fatigue management strategies by parents.
RESULTS:
Sixty one percent of parents in the sample (n=60) described fatigue as a current problem for their child. Having a child for whom fatigue was problematic was significantly correlated with having less time for the parents' own needs and limiting the types of activities that their family was able to participate in. Most parents were quite creative in developing strategies to minimize the impact of fatigue on their child's life. Only a few parents, however, described strategies that would empower the child to manage their own fatigue and thus result, hopefully, in less impact on family life. More empowering and less empowering strategies are described.
IMPLICATIONS:
Symptom management for children with disabilities and their families should include more of a focus on fatigue. In addition, studies targeting fatigue management need to incorporate the entire family as client and should include strategies aimed at empowering children and adolescents with disabilities to begin to manage their own fatigue.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSTRATEGIES USED BY PARENTS TO MANAGE FATIGUE IN CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157273-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">STRATEGIES USED BY PARENTS TO MANAGE FATIGUE IN CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Eddy, Linda L., PhD, RN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">14204 NE Salmon Creek Avenue, Vancouver, WA, 98686, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">leddy@vancouver.wsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>The aims of this paper are to better understand the salience of fatigue for children and adolescents with disabilities and their families and to explore fatigue-management strategies identified by their parents.<br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:<br/>According to the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, fourteen percent of children in the United States are estimated to have special health care needs. Fatigue is one of the most common patient reported symptoms across a broad range of chronic diseases and conditions. However, little is known about fatigue in children with disabilities and even less about its management.<br/>METHODS: <br/>As part of a broader study of longitudinal patterns of pain and fatigue in children and adolescents with physical disabilities, ninety eight parents responded to a mailed survey about their child's chronic health problem. The survey, comprised of items from well-established tools, contained questions asking how much of a problem fatigue was for their child and how much their child's chronic health problem limited types of activities that they participated in or interrupted typical family activities. In addition, parents were asked to identify fatigue management strategies used in the home or in other settings. Nomination of commonly used strategies occurred both through forced choice questions as well as through an open-ended question that encouraged parents to identify other useful strategies. Descriptive statistics, correlations, and parametric and nonparametric group difference tests were used to analyze most survey questions. Content analysis was used to explore the open-ended question about fatigue management strategies by parents. <br/>RESULTS: <br/>Sixty one percent of parents in the sample (n=60) described fatigue as a current problem for their child. Having a child for whom fatigue was problematic was significantly correlated with having less time for the parents' own needs and limiting the types of activities that their family was able to participate in. Most parents were quite creative in developing strategies to minimize the impact of fatigue on their child's life. Only a few parents, however, described strategies that would empower the child to manage their own fatigue and thus result, hopefully, in less impact on family life. More empowering and less empowering strategies are described. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: <br/>Symptom management for children with disabilities and their families should include more of a focus on fatigue. In addition, studies targeting fatigue management need to incorporate the entire family as client and should include strategies aimed at empowering children and adolescents with disabilities to begin to manage their own fatigue.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:43:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:43:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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