EMOTIONAL CONNECTION AND INTEGRATION: THEMES AMONG STUDENTS USING A VIRTUAL COMMUNITY

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157276
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EMOTIONAL CONNECTION AND INTEGRATION: THEMES AMONG STUDENTS USING A VIRTUAL COMMUNITY
Abstract:
EMOTIONAL CONNECTION AND INTEGRATION: THEMES AMONG STUDENTS USING A VIRTUAL COMMUNITY
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Giddens, Jean Foret, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico
Title:Professor
Contact Address:MSC09 5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA
Co-Authors:Geoff Shuster
PURPOSE: The use of virtual communities in nursing education is an emerging pedagogy that has generated substantial interest. The purpose of this presentation is to report qualitative themes that emerged from a cohort of students who used a virtual community over 3 academic semesters.
BACKGROUND: In 2006, the [blinded school] launched a virtual community known as [blinded] with hopes of facilitating of student-centered learning by providing context to nursing concepts through longitudinal lived experiences of characters. Faculty researchers were interested in gaining an understanding of what and how students learn from virtual communities. The aim of this study was to evaluate written student comments to assess for qualitative themes from students as a result of their exposure to this teaching application.
METHODS: This study involved a convenience sample of 40 undergraduate nursing students followed for three semesters as they used a virtual community. At the end of each semester, students completed a survey related to their experiences using the virtual community. Each survey included the same four open ended questions:
- Which character stories do you enjoy the most and why?
- Which character stories do you like the least and why?
- What did you find to be the most beneficial aspects of [blinded]
- What did you find to be the least beneficial aspects of [blinded]
Using the qualitative method of content analysis, student responses generated by the survey questions were grouped and analyzed to identify major themes from the data using well-documented content analysis procedures. Data from the open ended questions were initially broken down into phrases. The phrases were further coded into broad categories. These categories were later modified as data analysis continued and were grouped to best represent themes that emerged from the data. Exemplars that best represented the concepts for each theme were added when they provided further clarification.
OUTCOMES: Analysis of the questionnaire data revealed two primary themes: Students experienced an emotional connection to specific characters or families; and integration of characters and events into learning activities was perceived by students as beneficial.
CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this study suggest significant potential for virtual communities to change the practice of teaching and learning. Educational researchers have shown that emotion and integration enhance learning. Faculty often struggle to find student centered teaching strategies that effectively promote learning. It is possible that virtual communities can provide mechanisms for faculty to improve teaching through an application that promotes emotional connections and integration by design.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEMOTIONAL CONNECTION AND INTEGRATION: THEMES AMONG STUDENTS USING A VIRTUAL COMMUNITYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157276-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">EMOTIONAL CONNECTION AND INTEGRATION: THEMES AMONG STUDENTS USING A VIRTUAL COMMUNITY</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Giddens, Jean Foret, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MSC09 5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jgiddens@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Geoff Shuster</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: The use of virtual communities in nursing education is an emerging pedagogy that has generated substantial interest. The purpose of this presentation is to report qualitative themes that emerged from a cohort of students who used a virtual community over 3 academic semesters.<br/>BACKGROUND: In 2006, the [blinded school] launched a virtual community known as [blinded] with hopes of facilitating of student-centered learning by providing context to nursing concepts through longitudinal lived experiences of characters. Faculty researchers were interested in gaining an understanding of what and how students learn from virtual communities. The aim of this study was to evaluate written student comments to assess for qualitative themes from students as a result of their exposure to this teaching application. <br/>METHODS: This study involved a convenience sample of 40 undergraduate nursing students followed for three semesters as they used a virtual community. At the end of each semester, students completed a survey related to their experiences using the virtual community. Each survey included the same four open ended questions:<br/>- Which character stories do you enjoy the most and why?<br/>- Which character stories do you like the least and why?<br/>- What did you find to be the most beneficial aspects of [blinded]<br/>- What did you find to be the least beneficial aspects of [blinded]<br/>Using the qualitative method of content analysis, student responses generated by the survey questions were grouped and analyzed to identify major themes from the data using well-documented content analysis procedures. Data from the open ended questions were initially broken down into phrases. The phrases were further coded into broad categories. These categories were later modified as data analysis continued and were grouped to best represent themes that emerged from the data. Exemplars that best represented the concepts for each theme were added when they provided further clarification.<br/>OUTCOMES: Analysis of the questionnaire data revealed two primary themes: Students experienced an emotional connection to specific characters or families; and integration of characters and events into learning activities was perceived by students as beneficial.<br/>CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this study suggest significant potential for virtual communities to change the practice of teaching and learning. Educational researchers have shown that emotion and integration enhance learning. Faculty often struggle to find student centered teaching strategies that effectively promote learning. It is possible that virtual communities can provide mechanisms for faculty to improve teaching through an application that promotes emotional connections and integration by design.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:43:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:43:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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