IS LANGUAGE PREFERENCE IN HISPANICS ASSOCIATED WITH PREGNANCY-RELATED WEIGHT CHANGE?

10.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157277
Type:
Presentation
Title:
IS LANGUAGE PREFERENCE IN HISPANICS ASSOCIATED WITH PREGNANCY-RELATED WEIGHT CHANGE?
Abstract:
IS LANGUAGE PREFERENCE IN HISPANICS ASSOCIATED WITH PREGNANCY-RELATED WEIGHT CHANGE?
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Hackley, Barbara K., MSN, RN, CNM
P.I. Institution Name:Yale University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:100 Church Street South, P.O.Box 9740, New Haven, CT, 06536, USA
Co-Authors:Kristopher Fennie; Jo Applebaum; Diane Berry; Gail D'Eramo Melkus
PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this study was to describe the relationship between prenatal and postpartum weight patterns and acculturation among Hispanic women; Spanish preference indicating more identification with Hispanic culture and English preference indicating greater identification with White culture. The specific objectives were 1) to determine whether adherence rates to the Institute of Medicine prenatal weight gain recommendations or 2) weight loss by one year postpartum differed by language preference for self-identified Hispanic women. The long term goal is to identify pregnant women who may be at risk for long-term obesity.
BACKGROUND: Excessive prenatal weight gain has been found to be a risk factor for long-term obesity in White women. Compared to Non-Hispanic White women, Hispanic women are more likely to be overweight and to gain excessively in pregnancy, increasing their risk of pregnancy complications and the development, or worsening, of obesity. Health behaviors such as dietary intake and smoking vary by level of acculturation. Indicators of acculturation include length of residence, generational status, and language preference. Only language preference is commonly entered in health records.
METHODS: Data were abstracted from prenatal medical records of women seen in an urban community health center from 2000û2008. The sample included self-identified Hispanic women, English or Spanish-speaking, aged 16û40 years, with weight measured at equal to or less than 13 and at 37 weeks (third trimester) gestation. Exclusion criteria included diabetes, hypertension, other significant medical conditions or multiple gestations. Analysis was done using t-test, chi-square, and multivariate regression statistics.
RESULTS: Fifty two (20.1%) were primarily Spanish-speakers and 207 were primarily English-speakers. Overall, 43.6% exceeded prenatal weight gain recommendations; 30.8% of Spanish- speakers vs. 46.9% of English-speakers (P=.07). At late postpartum, 22.9% returned to their baseline body mass index (BMI +/- 0.5 kg/m2); Spanish-speakers retained 1.53 vs. 1.21 kg/m2 among English speakers. However, these patterns did not reach significance after adjusting for baseline BMI, age, and smoking.
IMPLICATIONS: Adherence to prenatal weight gain guidelines was poor. Few women returned to their baseline weight, regardless of language preference. While it did not reach significance, Hispanic Spanish-speakers tended to gain less weight in pregnancy and retain more weight postpartum. These results may be due to our relatively small sample size. Therefore, more studies of larger sample size are needed. Supported in part by grants T32 NR008346 to Margaret Grey and the Beatrice Renfield Grant to Barbara Hackley, Gail Melkus, and Diane Berry.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIS LANGUAGE PREFERENCE IN HISPANICS ASSOCIATED WITH PREGNANCY-RELATED WEIGHT CHANGE?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157277-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">IS LANGUAGE PREFERENCE IN HISPANICS ASSOCIATED WITH PREGNANCY-RELATED WEIGHT CHANGE?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hackley, Barbara K., MSN, RN, CNM</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Yale University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">100 Church Street South, P.O.Box 9740, New Haven, CT, 06536, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">barbara.hackley@yale.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kristopher Fennie; Jo Applebaum; Diane Berry; Gail D'Eramo Melkus</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this study was to describe the relationship between prenatal and postpartum weight patterns and acculturation among Hispanic women; Spanish preference indicating more identification with Hispanic culture and English preference indicating greater identification with White culture. The specific objectives were 1) to determine whether adherence rates to the Institute of Medicine prenatal weight gain recommendations or 2) weight loss by one year postpartum differed by language preference for self-identified Hispanic women. The long term goal is to identify pregnant women who may be at risk for long-term obesity. <br/>BACKGROUND: Excessive prenatal weight gain has been found to be a risk factor for long-term obesity in White women. Compared to Non-Hispanic White women, Hispanic women are more likely to be overweight and to gain excessively in pregnancy, increasing their risk of pregnancy complications and the development, or worsening, of obesity. Health behaviors such as dietary intake and smoking vary by level of acculturation. Indicators of acculturation include length of residence, generational status, and language preference. Only language preference is commonly entered in health records.<br/> METHODS: Data were abstracted from prenatal medical records of women seen in an urban community health center from 2000&ucirc;2008. The sample included self-identified Hispanic women, English or Spanish-speaking, aged 16&ucirc;40 years, with weight measured at equal to or less than 13 and at 37 weeks (third trimester) gestation. Exclusion criteria included diabetes, hypertension, other significant medical conditions or multiple gestations. Analysis was done using t-test, chi-square, and multivariate regression statistics. <br/>RESULTS: Fifty two (20.1%) were primarily Spanish-speakers and 207 were primarily English-speakers. Overall, 43.6% exceeded prenatal weight gain recommendations; 30.8% of Spanish- speakers vs. 46.9% of English-speakers (P=.07). At late postpartum, 22.9% returned to their baseline body mass index (BMI +/- 0.5 kg/m2); Spanish-speakers retained 1.53 vs. 1.21 kg/m2 among English speakers. However, these patterns did not reach significance after adjusting for baseline BMI, age, and smoking. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Adherence to prenatal weight gain guidelines was poor. Few women returned to their baseline weight, regardless of language preference. While it did not reach significance, Hispanic Spanish-speakers tended to gain less weight in pregnancy and retain more weight postpartum. These results may be due to our relatively small sample size. Therefore, more studies of larger sample size are needed. Supported in part by grants T32 NR008346 to Margaret Grey and the Beatrice Renfield Grant to Barbara Hackley, Gail Melkus, and Diane Berry.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:43:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:43:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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