2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157278
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PEER TO PEER MENTORING: NAVIGATING A SECOND DEGREE PROGRAM
Abstract:
PEER TO PEER MENTORING: NAVIGATING A SECOND DEGREE PROGRAM
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Hansen-Kyle, Linda, PhD, RN, CCM
P.I. Institution Name:Azusa Pacific University, San Diego Regional Center
Title:Faculty
Contact Address:5353 Mission Center Road Suite 300, San Diego, CA, 92129, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS: The aim of this longitudinal qualitative research project was to gain insight regarding students' perceptions of a peer to peer mentorship program
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Students from other disciplines who enter the field of nursing are often unprepared for the programs rigorous and time consuming requirements. This can result in the student doing poorly in initial courses, or dropping out of the program (Eastmond-Robinson 1999). Studies have indicated that peer to peer mentorship in other college settings helps students to adjust to new surroundings and new requirements (Pitney and Ehlers 2004). Student nurse mentoring projects have promoted collegiality within the educational and professional setting (Sprengel and Job 2004; Scott 2005; Gilmour, Kopeikin et al. 2007). However, little research in the application of the peer to peer mentoring with second degree nursing students has been done. This project paired incoming (semester one) second degree nursing students with established (semester three) second degree nursing students. The students met weekly or bi-weekly initially and more often as the students wish. Additionally, e-mail conversations and chats occurred. The focus of the meetings was study tips, social and family life balance, clinical experiences, and other non-academic topics of concern to both students. The project director acted as a resource of support for both mentors and mentees and provided general guidelines for the project (i.e. purpose of the project, method, etc.). Individual questionnaires were conducted for themes related to the project as identified by the students. Those themes identified as important for the students can then be developed further and perhaps incorporated in the other second degree programs within the nursing department.
METHODS:
Sample Four cohorts of students were included in the study. Students who were in semesters 1 and 3 of the EENAP (Early Entry into Nursing and Advanced Practice) program participated in the mentoring program. All students in these two semesters were invited to participate, but were not required to do so, and there was no penalty for not participating. However, all students chose to participate.
Method
a) Recruitment procedures: Each class was approached, the study explained and volunteers solicited.
b) Randomization procedures: Students were matched as closely as possible for background, age, etc. No pure randomization will be utilized.
c) Research Design: Longitudinal Qualitative research design to discover key issues or themes identified by students through questionnaires.
Data Analysis
Analysis of the data through use of coding for themes and dimensions in the tradition of Corbin and Strauss were utilized. Major recurring themes were grouped and relationships identified. Theoretical statements based on the thematic discoveries were developed.

RESULTS:
Findings included themes of inclusion, adjustment to school, support, self-esteem, leadership experience, and giving back.
IMPLICATIONS:
Peer to peer mentoring is important for success in accelerated second degree programs. Students supported this type of mentoring as it reduced stress and focused on method to achieve success
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePEER TO PEER MENTORING: NAVIGATING A SECOND DEGREE PROGRAMen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157278-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">PEER TO PEER MENTORING: NAVIGATING A SECOND DEGREE PROGRAM</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hansen-Kyle, Linda, PhD, RN, CCM</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Azusa Pacific University, San Diego Regional Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Faculty</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5353 Mission Center Road Suite 300, San Diego, CA, 92129, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lhansen-kyle@apu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: The aim of this longitudinal qualitative research project was to gain insight regarding students' perceptions of a peer to peer mentorship program <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Students from other disciplines who enter the field of nursing are often unprepared for the programs rigorous and time consuming requirements. This can result in the student doing poorly in initial courses, or dropping out of the program (Eastmond-Robinson 1999). Studies have indicated that peer to peer mentorship in other college settings helps students to adjust to new surroundings and new requirements (Pitney and Ehlers 2004). Student nurse mentoring projects have promoted collegiality within the educational and professional setting (Sprengel and Job 2004; Scott 2005; Gilmour, Kopeikin et al. 2007). However, little research in the application of the peer to peer mentoring with second degree nursing students has been done. This project paired incoming (semester one) second degree nursing students with established (semester three) second degree nursing students. The students met weekly or bi-weekly initially and more often as the students wish. Additionally, e-mail conversations and chats occurred. The focus of the meetings was study tips, social and family life balance, clinical experiences, and other non-academic topics of concern to both students. The project director acted as a resource of support for both mentors and mentees and provided general guidelines for the project (i.e. purpose of the project, method, etc.). Individual questionnaires were conducted for themes related to the project as identified by the students. Those themes identified as important for the students can then be developed further and perhaps incorporated in the other second degree programs within the nursing department.<br/>METHODS: <br/>Sample Four cohorts of students were included in the study. Students who were in semesters 1 and 3 of the EENAP (Early Entry into Nursing and Advanced Practice) program participated in the mentoring program. All students in these two semesters were invited to participate, but were not required to do so, and there was no penalty for not participating. However, all students chose to participate. <br/>Method<br/>a) Recruitment procedures: Each class was approached, the study explained and volunteers solicited. <br/>b) Randomization procedures: Students were matched as closely as possible for background, age, etc. No pure randomization will be utilized.<br/>c) Research Design: Longitudinal Qualitative research design to discover key issues or themes identified by students through questionnaires. <br/>Data Analysis <br/>Analysis of the data through use of coding for themes and dimensions in the tradition of Corbin and Strauss were utilized. Major recurring themes were grouped and relationships identified. Theoretical statements based on the thematic discoveries were developed.<br/><br/>RESULTS: <br/>Findings included themes of inclusion, adjustment to school, support, self-esteem, leadership experience, and giving back. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: <br/>Peer to peer mentoring is important for success in accelerated second degree programs. Students supported this type of mentoring as it reduced stress and focused on method to achieve success<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:43:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:43:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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