COMMUNICATION PATTERNING AND DIABETIC OUTCOMES: ADVANCING RESEARCH INTO PRACTICE

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157280
Type:
Presentation
Title:
COMMUNICATION PATTERNING AND DIABETIC OUTCOMES: ADVANCING RESEARCH INTO PRACTICE
Abstract:
COMMUNICATION PATTERNING AND DIABETIC OUTCOMES: ADVANCING RESEARCH INTO PRACTICE
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Kennett, James R., PhD(c), RN, NP, FNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Mount St. Mary's College
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:10 Chester Place, Los Angeles, CA, 90007-2598, USA
PURPOSE: Examine the degree of communication patterning that influences diabetic outcomes. BACKGROUND: Twenty-four million people are diagnosed with diabetes in the U.S. (8% of the population). Diabetes is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S. There has been an increase of 3 million people with diabetes since 2007. There is an estimated 57 million people with pre-diabetes. By 2025 there will 333 million people worldwide with diabetes. There is an estimated $174 billion spent between direct and indirect cost for diabetes care. Current strategies are lacking the needed results for people with diabetes. The American Diabetes Association reports 7.3% of all three biological markers (hemoglobin A1c, blood pressure, and cholesterol) are being achieved. Yet, when people with diabetes have access to nursing, there is a 50% improvement of hemoglobin A1c. People that have diabetes, have more than just a medical condition-diabetes is a human condition. More evidenced-based practice for people with diabetes needs to be established that works. Nursing science has contributed uniquely to the literature for improving diabetic outcomes. More specifically, nursing uses more than objective data (HgA1c) but relies heavily on subjective data via communication patterning. Communication patterning is defined as having three key elements: sharing, reciprocity, and synergy. Aims of the study include: examine the relationship between effective communication and diabetic outcomes; investigate the dynamic of effective communication for people with diabetes, investigate the differences between effective communication patterning with age, gender, marital status, education level, and ethnicity; describe the usefulness of a conceptual framework guiding research to minimize the gap between research and practice.
METHODS: A non-experimental survey design will be used. Data will be collected from a Southern California Diabetes Center. Sample size will be targeted at 110. Inclusion criteria: all people diagnosed with type 1 and type 2 diabetes for a period of more than two years, 18 years old and greater; who can read and write English or Spanish. Exclusion criteria will be those individuals with gestational diabetes. Procedurally, after obtaining human subject approval from the University and Diabetes Center, the researcher will introduce the project to the center staff. Posters/announcements will be placed in the waiting areas, and the healthcare provider will invite the patient to participate in the study after the completion of the encounter. Survey Monkey« will also be used for the patients of Center, who may choice to do the survey at another time. The Boren Health Partnership Scale will be used as the measurement tool with a Clinical Record review for each completed survey for the latest HgA1c, current BP and LDL-c. Analysis and IMPLICATIONS: Data collection, analysis and implications are pending. Anticipated data collection time frame October 2009 to December 2009. Funding Dean's Scholar Research Award
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCOMMUNICATION PATTERNING AND DIABETIC OUTCOMES: ADVANCING RESEARCH INTO PRACTICEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157280-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">COMMUNICATION PATTERNING AND DIABETIC OUTCOMES: ADVANCING RESEARCH INTO PRACTICE</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kennett, James R., PhD(c), RN, NP, FNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Mount St. Mary's College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10 Chester Place, Los Angeles, CA, 90007-2598, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jrkennett@sbcglobal.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: Examine the degree of communication patterning that influences diabetic outcomes. BACKGROUND: Twenty-four million people are diagnosed with diabetes in the U.S. (8% of the population). Diabetes is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S. There has been an increase of 3 million people with diabetes since 2007. There is an estimated 57 million people with pre-diabetes. By 2025 there will 333 million people worldwide with diabetes. There is an estimated $174 billion spent between direct and indirect cost for diabetes care. Current strategies are lacking the needed results for people with diabetes. The American Diabetes Association reports 7.3% of all three biological markers (hemoglobin A1c, blood pressure, and cholesterol) are being achieved. Yet, when people with diabetes have access to nursing, there is a 50% improvement of hemoglobin A1c. People that have diabetes, have more than just a medical condition-diabetes is a human condition. More evidenced-based practice for people with diabetes needs to be established that works. Nursing science has contributed uniquely to the literature for improving diabetic outcomes. More specifically, nursing uses more than objective data (HgA1c) but relies heavily on subjective data via communication patterning. Communication patterning is defined as having three key elements: sharing, reciprocity, and synergy. Aims of the study include: examine the relationship between effective communication and diabetic outcomes; investigate the dynamic of effective communication for people with diabetes, investigate the differences between effective communication patterning with age, gender, marital status, education level, and ethnicity; describe the usefulness of a conceptual framework guiding research to minimize the gap between research and practice. <br/>METHODS: A non-experimental survey design will be used. Data will be collected from a Southern California Diabetes Center. Sample size will be targeted at 110. Inclusion criteria: all people diagnosed with type 1 and type 2 diabetes for a period of more than two years, 18 years old and greater; who can read and write English or Spanish. Exclusion criteria will be those individuals with gestational diabetes. Procedurally, after obtaining human subject approval from the University and Diabetes Center, the researcher will introduce the project to the center staff. Posters/announcements will be placed in the waiting areas, and the healthcare provider will invite the patient to participate in the study after the completion of the encounter. Survey Monkey&laquo; will also be used for the patients of Center, who may choice to do the survey at another time. The Boren Health Partnership Scale will be used as the measurement tool with a Clinical Record review for each completed survey for the latest HgA1c, current BP and LDL-c. Analysis and IMPLICATIONS: Data collection, analysis and implications are pending. Anticipated data collection time frame October 2009 to December 2009. Funding Dean's Scholar Research Award <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:43:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:43:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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