2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157281
Type:
Presentation
Title:
WEB-BASED VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM PREVENTION EDUCATION
Abstract:
WEB-BASED VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM PREVENTION EDUCATION
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Lee, Jung-Ah, Ph.D., RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, Irvine
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:903 Gabrielino Drive, Irvine, CA, 92617, USA
Co-Authors:Brenda K. Zierler; Seth Wolpin
BACKGROUND: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is one of the most common preventable clinical disorders among hospitalized patients in the United States. Evidence to support the use of prophylaxis to prevent VTE has been available for years, yet VTE remains a problem in hospitalized patients. The care for VTE requires coordination across multiple providers and settings.
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a web-based educational program on VTE prevention at an academic medical center and to explore different approaches to delivering education in an on-line format.
METHODS: This was a randomized trial comparing two different educational approaches including passive-didactic slides (PD) vs. interactive case studies (IC) to determine the most effective way to teach and assess healthcare provider knowledge on VTE prevention. Following IRB approval, participants who consented were asked to complete a pre test and then were shown passive, didactic slides with information on VTE prevention. The participants who were randomly assigned to the IC group were also asked to complete 4 series of real-life cases. The IC group received immediate feedback when an answer was chosen. All participants were then administered a post test. In order to achieve a 'certificate of completion', all participants had to score 80% or above. Options were available to repeat the post test and also allowing participants to return to the educational materials.
RESULTS: A total of 89 providers in the hospital consented to participate in the research aspect of this training module. Sixty-eight (76%) participants completed the pre test and post test. Among those, 35 were randomly assigned into the PD group and 33 were in the IC group. No demographic differences were found between the two groups. There was marginal knowledge improvement in the PD group (the pre test mean score=80.0 +/- 13.3, the post test mean score=85.4 +/- 12.2, p-value=0.068) but little improvement in the IC group (the pre test =78.2 +/- 11.0, the post test =79.39 +/- 15.0, p-value=0.58). There was no significant difference in post test mean scores in the two groups (p-value=0.07). The educational effect including both methods was marginal (the pre test =79.1 +/- 12.2, the post test = 82.5 +/- 13.9, p-value=0.07). Free text, qualitative comments were also solicited within the application, responses included 'Did not take the time to look over guidelines', 'Summarize key points from the PDFs on the presentation slides', and 'Good format and links are helpful'.
CONCLUSIONS/IMPLICATIONS: The web-based VTE prevention training modules were marginally effective in improving VTE prevention knowledge in providers. The effect of the passive-didactic training was better than that of the interactive case study training. These RESULTS: may be due to participants feeling fatigued after completing 4 interactive cases in addition to the passive-didactic slides. Other factors may also have been at play including possible ceiling effects, contamination effects by having multiple browsers open and historical effects given other concurrent educational efforts. The time spent for training and the motivation for learning should be considered in designing continuing educational modules.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWEB-BASED VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM PREVENTION EDUCATIONen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157281-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">WEB-BASED VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM PREVENTION EDUCATION</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lee, Jung-Ah, Ph.D., RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, Irvine</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">903 Gabrielino Drive, Irvine, CA, 92617, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jungahl@uci.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Brenda K. Zierler; Seth Wolpin</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is one of the most common preventable clinical disorders among hospitalized patients in the United States. Evidence to support the use of prophylaxis to prevent VTE has been available for years, yet VTE remains a problem in hospitalized patients. The care for VTE requires coordination across multiple providers and settings. <br/>PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a web-based educational program on VTE prevention at an academic medical center and to explore different approaches to delivering education in an on-line format. <br/>METHODS: This was a randomized trial comparing two different educational approaches including passive-didactic slides (PD) vs. interactive case studies (IC) to determine the most effective way to teach and assess healthcare provider knowledge on VTE prevention. Following IRB approval, participants who consented were asked to complete a pre test and then were shown passive, didactic slides with information on VTE prevention. The participants who were randomly assigned to the IC group were also asked to complete 4 series of real-life cases. The IC group received immediate feedback when an answer was chosen. All participants were then administered a post test. In order to achieve a 'certificate of completion', all participants had to score 80% or above. Options were available to repeat the post test and also allowing participants to return to the educational materials. <br/>RESULTS: A total of 89 providers in the hospital consented to participate in the research aspect of this training module. Sixty-eight (76%) participants completed the pre test and post test. Among those, 35 were randomly assigned into the PD group and 33 were in the IC group. No demographic differences were found between the two groups. There was marginal knowledge improvement in the PD group (the pre test mean score=80.0 +/- 13.3, the post test mean score=85.4 +/- 12.2, p-value=0.068) but little improvement in the IC group (the pre test =78.2 +/- 11.0, the post test =79.39 +/- 15.0, p-value=0.58). There was no significant difference in post test mean scores in the two groups (p-value=0.07). The educational effect including both methods was marginal (the pre test =79.1 +/- 12.2, the post test = 82.5 +/- 13.9, p-value=0.07). Free text, qualitative comments were also solicited within the application, responses included 'Did not take the time to look over guidelines', 'Summarize key points from the PDFs on the presentation slides', and 'Good format and links are helpful'. <br/>CONCLUSIONS/IMPLICATIONS: The web-based VTE prevention training modules were marginally effective in improving VTE prevention knowledge in providers. The effect of the passive-didactic training was better than that of the interactive case study training. These RESULTS: may be due to participants feeling fatigued after completing 4 interactive cases in addition to the passive-didactic slides. Other factors may also have been at play including possible ceiling effects, contamination effects by having multiple browsers open and historical effects given other concurrent educational efforts. The time spent for training and the motivation for learning should be considered in designing continuing educational modules.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:43:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:43:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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