2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157285
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PREVENTING OVERWEIGHT FOR SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN WITH SPINA BIFIDA
Abstract:
PREVENTING OVERWEIGHT FOR SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN WITH SPINA BIFIDA
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Luther, Brenda, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Utah
Title:Doctoral Candidate
Contact Address:10 S. 2000 E., Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS:
The purpose of this study was to explore how parents of children (ages 6-11 years) with spina bifida develop food and physical activity health promotion processes for their children to prevent overweight.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
Children with spina bifida face an increased risk of overweight compared to their able-bodied peers. Overweight negatively influences already compromised physical and emotional functioning for children with spina bifida, placing additional burdens and risks in their lives. Health promotion activities directed to overweight prevention competes with other caregiving demands for these parents. Parents of children with spina bifida demonstrate heavy caregiver burden, overriding medical concerns for their childÆs health, and an inability to teach health promotion skills and self-care management to their children.
METHODS:
This qualitative, exploratory, descriptive study accessed a purposeful sample of 12 parents (9 mothers and 3 fathers) of children 6 to 11-years-old with spina bifida recruited from two regional, specialty pediatric clinics in the Intermountain West. Constant-comparative methods were used to identify basic social processes. Individual interviews with parents were conducted to explore the social processes parents use to form food and physical activity choices designed to prevent overweight and promote health for their children with spina bifida.
RESULTS:
Three major themes of health promotion were developed: managing spina bifida and maintaining healthy bowel function; managing food; and a developmental description of physical activity for children with spina bifida. Findings from this study describe the health promotion beliefs of parents, how parents manage food, and how they encourage physical activity in the prevention of overweight for their children with spina bifida. Health promotion for these parents is a concept based on disease management and maintaining optimal bowel function. Managing food is a complex process of monitoring, adapting, portioning, and restricting food for these parents. Parents struggle to encourage their children with spina bifida to remain physically active as they become older. School-age children with spina bifida may experience a common transition as they move from being physically active and healthy weight to becoming sedentary and overweight as they near puberty. A description of the trajectory of overweight as a secondary condition for children with spina bifida during the school-age years of 6 to 11 developed from the data.
IMPLICATIONS:
This study provides essential information about parent processes of: promoting health and how health is affected through bowel management, food management and consumption, and encouraging physical activity all of which affect prevention of the serious secondary condition of overweight. Clinical guidelines for school-age children with spina bifida can be adapted to incorporate knowledge of parent process related to decreasing the risk of overweight and negating the effects of overweight for their children. Knowledge of this study can help healthcare providers assess their current practice of assessment and intervention and remodel their focus from a child's condition or disability to a focus on holistic health promotion practices.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePREVENTING OVERWEIGHT FOR SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN WITH SPINA BIFIDAen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157285-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">PREVENTING OVERWEIGHT FOR SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN WITH SPINA BIFIDA</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Luther, Brenda, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Utah</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10 S. 2000 E., Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">brenda.luther@nurs.utah.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS:<br/>The purpose of this study was to explore how parents of children (ages 6-11 years) with spina bifida develop food and physical activity health promotion processes for their children to prevent overweight. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: <br/>Children with spina bifida face an increased risk of overweight compared to their able-bodied peers. Overweight negatively influences already compromised physical and emotional functioning for children with spina bifida, placing additional burdens and risks in their lives. Health promotion activities directed to overweight prevention competes with other caregiving demands for these parents. Parents of children with spina bifida demonstrate heavy caregiver burden, overriding medical concerns for their child&AElig;s health, and an inability to teach health promotion skills and self-care management to their children. <br/>METHODS: <br/>This qualitative, exploratory, descriptive study accessed a purposeful sample of 12 parents (9 mothers and 3 fathers) of children 6 to 11-years-old with spina bifida recruited from two regional, specialty pediatric clinics in the Intermountain West. Constant-comparative methods were used to identify basic social processes. Individual interviews with parents were conducted to explore the social processes parents use to form food and physical activity choices designed to prevent overweight and promote health for their children with spina bifida. <br/>RESULTS: <br/>Three major themes of health promotion were developed: managing spina bifida and maintaining healthy bowel function; managing food; and a developmental description of physical activity for children with spina bifida. Findings from this study describe the health promotion beliefs of parents, how parents manage food, and how they encourage physical activity in the prevention of overweight for their children with spina bifida. Health promotion for these parents is a concept based on disease management and maintaining optimal bowel function. Managing food is a complex process of monitoring, adapting, portioning, and restricting food for these parents. Parents struggle to encourage their children with spina bifida to remain physically active as they become older. School-age children with spina bifida may experience a common transition as they move from being physically active and healthy weight to becoming sedentary and overweight as they near puberty. A description of the trajectory of overweight as a secondary condition for children with spina bifida during the school-age years of 6 to 11 developed from the data. <br/>IMPLICATIONS:<br/>This study provides essential information about parent processes of: promoting health and how health is affected through bowel management, food management and consumption, and encouraging physical activity all of which affect prevention of the serious secondary condition of overweight. Clinical guidelines for school-age children with spina bifida can be adapted to incorporate knowledge of parent process related to decreasing the risk of overweight and negating the effects of overweight for their children. Knowledge of this study can help healthcare providers assess their current practice of assessment and intervention and remodel their focus from a child's condition or disability to a focus on holistic health promotion practices.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:44:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:44:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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