2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157286
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EXPANDING BACCALAUREATE NURSING STUDENTS' ATTITUDES ABOUT POVERTY
Abstract:
EXPANDING BACCALAUREATE NURSING STUDENTS' ATTITUDES ABOUT POVERTY
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Menzel, Nancy, PhD, RN, PHCNS-BC, CNE
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:4505 Maryland Parkway, Box 453025, Las Vegas, NV, 89122, USA
Co-Authors:Michele Clark; Cheryl Darby-Carlberg
PURPOSE: According to the latest data from the U.S Census, 13.2% of the population is living in poverty. Despite this percentage, most nursing programs provide minimal curricular content to foster culturally competent responses to this increasingly important social determinant of health. This study sought to evaluate a three hour poverty simulation program's effect on senior baccalaureate nursing students' (BSN) attitudes and judgments related to the poor.
BACKGROUND: Socioeconomic status and health are correlated, with those living in poverty having the worst health status. They often perceive that caregivers are insensitive to their plight, possibly due to erroneous beliefs about the causes of poverty (Reutter, Sword, Meagher-Stewart, & Rideout, 2004).
METHODS: The investigators staged the Missouri Association for Community Action (MACA) Poverty Simulation program in Spring 2008 as an educational tool for 48 generic BSN students ranging in age from 21 to 30 years; 83% were female. The simulation placed students into a scripted role in predetermined families with the charge of meeting basic needs for a month. The month was broken into four time periods, each representing one week. The characters students were portraying had to accomplish specific tasks during each week, such as applying for financial assistance, attending school, or shopping for food. Participants had to secure transportation vouchers to reach resources. Faculty and volunteers from a local homeless shelter played the social services, employer, governmental, and merchant roles. We received human subjects' protection review from the university's institutional review board. The students were asked to fill out a modified version of the 43 item Attitudes toward Poverty questionnaire before and after the simulation. This tool has adequate psychometric properties.
RESULTS: Post-test scores showed statistically significant improvements in 14 items, including reduced negative feelings about those living in poverty and increased recognition that poverty can be caused by such things as a lack of childcare, transportation, or racial prejudice. During the group discussion exercises following the simulation, many students expressed amazement at the barriers they faced meeting their simulated families' basic needs due to unavailable basic resources. Most failed to recognize the eight homeless volunteers, instead mistaking them for real agency personnel. The students stated that this exercise shifted their attitudes on the causes of poverty and the many difficulties the poor face in maintaining food and shelter, even when they have employment.
IMPLICATIONS: It is challenging to assist BSN students to obtain the skills and attitudes needed to work successfully with poor individuals and families and to intervene "upstream" in the structural causes of poverty. A poverty simulation is an effective means to widen student perspectives on the complex ecology of poverty and change attitudes about those it ensnares, an overlooked and often demonized subculture.

Reutter, L.I., Sword, W., Meagher-Stewart, D., & Rideout, E. (2004). Nursing students' beliefs about poverty and health. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 48(3), 299-309.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEXPANDING BACCALAUREATE NURSING STUDENTS' ATTITUDES ABOUT POVERTYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157286-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">EXPANDING BACCALAUREATE NURSING STUDENTS' ATTITUDES ABOUT POVERTY</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Menzel, Nancy, PhD, RN, PHCNS-BC, CNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada, Las Vegas</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4505 Maryland Parkway, Box 453025, Las Vegas, NV, 89122, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nancy.menzel@unlv.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Michele Clark; Cheryl Darby-Carlberg</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: According to the latest data from the U.S Census, 13.2% of the population is living in poverty. Despite this percentage, most nursing programs provide minimal curricular content to foster culturally competent responses to this increasingly important social determinant of health. This study sought to evaluate a three hour poverty simulation program's effect on senior baccalaureate nursing students' (BSN) attitudes and judgments related to the poor. <br/> BACKGROUND: Socioeconomic status and health are correlated, with those living in poverty having the worst health status. They often perceive that caregivers are insensitive to their plight, possibly due to erroneous beliefs about the causes of poverty (Reutter, Sword, Meagher-Stewart, &amp; Rideout, 2004). <br/> METHODS: The investigators staged the Missouri Association for Community Action (MACA) Poverty Simulation program in Spring 2008 as an educational tool for 48 generic BSN students ranging in age from 21 to 30 years; 83% were female. The simulation placed students into a scripted role in predetermined families with the charge of meeting basic needs for a month. The month was broken into four time periods, each representing one week. The characters students were portraying had to accomplish specific tasks during each week, such as applying for financial assistance, attending school, or shopping for food. Participants had to secure transportation vouchers to reach resources. Faculty and volunteers from a local homeless shelter played the social services, employer, governmental, and merchant roles. We received human subjects' protection review from the university's institutional review board. The students were asked to fill out a modified version of the 43 item Attitudes toward Poverty questionnaire before and after the simulation. This tool has adequate psychometric properties.<br/> RESULTS: Post-test scores showed statistically significant improvements in 14 items, including reduced negative feelings about those living in poverty and increased recognition that poverty can be caused by such things as a lack of childcare, transportation, or racial prejudice. During the group discussion exercises following the simulation, many students expressed amazement at the barriers they faced meeting their simulated families' basic needs due to unavailable basic resources. Most failed to recognize the eight homeless volunteers, instead mistaking them for real agency personnel. The students stated that this exercise shifted their attitudes on the causes of poverty and the many difficulties the poor face in maintaining food and shelter, even when they have employment. <br/> IMPLICATIONS: It is challenging to assist BSN students to obtain the skills and attitudes needed to work successfully with poor individuals and families and to intervene &quot;upstream&quot; in the structural causes of poverty. A poverty simulation is an effective means to widen student perspectives on the complex ecology of poverty and change attitudes about those it ensnares, an overlooked and often demonized subculture. <br/> <br/>Reutter, L.I., Sword, W., Meagher-Stewart, D., &amp; Rideout, E. (2004). Nursing students' beliefs about poverty and health. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 48(3), 299-309.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:44:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:44:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.