2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157288
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PROMOTING COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION IN DATA ANALYSIS THROUGH PHOTOVOICE
Abstract:
PROMOTING COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION IN DATA ANALYSIS THROUGH PHOTOVOICE
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Postma, Julie, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:PO Box 1495, Spokane, WA, 99210-1495, USA
Co-Authors:Jeff Peterson
PURPOSES/AIMS:
The purpose of this paper is to report the methods used to promote participation in collecting, analyzing, interpreting and disseminating data in a Community-based participatory research (CBPR) project focused on children's environmental health (EH) in a farm worker community. The specific aims of the parent study were to engage community health workers (CHWs) in: a) Identifying local assets and concerns related to children's EH in their community, and b) Educating community leaders and outside researchers about children's EH issues from a community perspective.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
Community-based participatory research (CBPR) aims to engage community members as co-researchers in order to create action for social change. However, community participation is often limited to recruitment and data collection. Community members rarely participate in data analysis and interpretation, a barrier to issue ownership and project sustainability. Innovative methods are needed to promote community participation in all aspects of the research process.
METHODS:
Photovoice is a CBPR methodology based upon the theoretical literature on education for critical consciousness, feminist theory, and empowerment. Twenty CHWs were invited to participate in a photovoice project through flyers posted at the local migrant and community health clinic, an informational meeting, and word of mouth. Participants were trained to take photographs ethically, given disposable cameras, and encouraged to photograph people, places, and things that convey their perspectives on problems and community strengths related to children's EH in their community. After photograph development, they were asked to consider multiple dimensions of the most significant photographs in small groups, using the mnemonic SHOWeD: What do you see here? WhatÆs really happening here? How does this relate to our lives? Why does this problem, concern or strength exist? What can we do about it?
RESULTS:
Through co-facilitation by university researchers and community leaders, CHWs: a) selected key photographs to illustrate local assets and concerns related to children's EH in their community, b) identified themes around the concepts of "community," "children," "environment," and "health," and c) disseminated findings locally through presentations.
IMPLICATIONS:
Methodologically, this study has contributed to the CBPR literature by involving a new population, CHWs in a farm worker community, in photovoice. Further, CHWs were engaged in data analysis, interpretation, and dissemination phases of the research process. Locally, RESULTS: will be used to advance children's EH by documenting existing assets to be protected and needs to be addressed and taking those issues to community leaders. Nationally, the photovoice project will contribute to the development of EH promotion interventions specific to the EH risks faced by agricultural communities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePROMOTING COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION IN DATA ANALYSIS THROUGH PHOTOVOICEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157288-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">PROMOTING COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION IN DATA ANALYSIS THROUGH PHOTOVOICE</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Postma, Julie, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 1495, Spokane, WA, 99210-1495, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jpostma@wsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jeff Peterson</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>The purpose of this paper is to report the methods used to promote participation in collecting, analyzing, interpreting and disseminating data in a Community-based participatory research (CBPR) project focused on children's environmental health (EH) in a farm worker community. The specific aims of the parent study were to engage community health workers (CHWs) in: a) Identifying local assets and concerns related to children's EH in their community, and b) Educating community leaders and outside researchers about children's EH issues from a community perspective.<br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: <br/>Community-based participatory research (CBPR) aims to engage community members as co-researchers in order to create action for social change. However, community participation is often limited to recruitment and data collection. Community members rarely participate in data analysis and interpretation, a barrier to issue ownership and project sustainability. Innovative methods are needed to promote community participation in all aspects of the research process. <br/>METHODS: <br/>Photovoice is a CBPR methodology based upon the theoretical literature on education for critical consciousness, feminist theory, and empowerment. Twenty CHWs were invited to participate in a photovoice project through flyers posted at the local migrant and community health clinic, an informational meeting, and word of mouth. Participants were trained to take photographs ethically, given disposable cameras, and encouraged to photograph people, places, and things that convey their perspectives on problems and community strengths related to children's EH in their community. After photograph development, they were asked to consider multiple dimensions of the most significant photographs in small groups, using the mnemonic SHOWeD: What do you see here? What&AElig;s really happening here? How does this relate to our lives? Why does this problem, concern or strength exist? What can we do about it?<br/>RESULTS: <br/>Through co-facilitation by university researchers and community leaders, CHWs: a) selected key photographs to illustrate local assets and concerns related to children's EH in their community, b) identified themes around the concepts of &quot;community,&quot; &quot;children,&quot; &quot;environment,&quot; and &quot;health,&quot; and c) disseminated findings locally through presentations.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: <br/>Methodologically, this study has contributed to the CBPR literature by involving a new population, CHWs in a farm worker community, in photovoice. Further, CHWs were engaged in data analysis, interpretation, and dissemination phases of the research process. Locally, RESULTS: will be used to advance children's EH by documenting existing assets to be protected and needs to be addressed and taking those issues to community leaders. Nationally, the photovoice project will contribute to the development of EH promotion interventions specific to the EH risks faced by agricultural communities.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:44:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:44:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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