2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157289
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE INTERSECTION OF HISPANIC CULTURE AND HOME TELEMONITORING
Abstract:
THE INTERSECTION OF HISPANIC CULTURE AND HOME TELEMONITORING
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Shea, Kimberly, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:500 North 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS: Home telemonitoring has immense potential for decreasing exacerbations of chronic conditions. However, as with any intervention - the effectiveness of home monitoring may vary depending on the cultural or age group in which it is implemented. Rapid development of this technology has provided little opportunity for investigation of barriers to effectiveness among different groups. This presentation will examine cultural concerns of using home monitoring technology for care of elderly Hispanics.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: There are over 48 million Hispanics living in the United States and, by the year 2050 is projected to account for more than 30% of the population. Hispanics have disproportionately high rates of chronic illnesses such as diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular diseases - all of which become more prevalent with increasing age.
Home monitoring technology allows healthcare providers to monitor chronic disease its use is projected to exponentially expand - serving over seven million people by 2010. Research suggests that although home monitoring has many benefits, the challenge with effective remote integration lies in its use in everyday settings. Telemonitoring in a patient's home becomes a part of daily activities and is a window into the privacy of his or her life. However, little is known about how monitoring technology intersects with the cultural needs of the population that is being served. Remote technology can improve the efficiency of serving the health needs of a large population, however, cultural concerns must be considered to achieve effective care.
METHODS: The literature was reviewed for technologies that are most frequently used. A synthesis of our knowledge of these technologies by examining their congruence with the cultural needs of elderly Hispanics was generated. Examples were identified of factors to be considered in the design of technological innovations used to help Hispanic elderly patients age in their homes.
RESULTS: Trust, time orientation, tradition, language, and perception of being a burden are examples of factors which can influence the use of remote monitoring. Additionally, mobility and connectivity are extremely influential factors because Hispanics are one of the largest users of Broadband in the U.S.; however they trail other U.S. populations in Internet use.
IMPLICATIONS: As healthcare practices and reimbursement move forward to embrace remote home care practices, agencies will need to carefully consider the cultural concerns of elderly Hispanics. Similar technologies may appear to have similar effectiveness - but there may be differences in how one or the other may be integrated in to the care for a particular cultural or age group. In order to provide the most effective care, providers will need to consider cultural factors to best promote the health of the patients served.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE INTERSECTION OF HISPANIC CULTURE AND HOME TELEMONITORINGen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157289-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">THE INTERSECTION OF HISPANIC CULTURE AND HOME TELEMONITORING</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shea, Kimberly, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 North 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Kimberly.Shea@asu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: Home telemonitoring has immense potential for decreasing exacerbations of chronic conditions. However, as with any intervention - the effectiveness of home monitoring may vary depending on the cultural or age group in which it is implemented. Rapid development of this technology has provided little opportunity for investigation of barriers to effectiveness among different groups. This presentation will examine cultural concerns of using home monitoring technology for care of elderly Hispanics. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: There are over 48 million Hispanics living in the United States and, by the year 2050 is projected to account for more than 30% of the population. Hispanics have disproportionately high rates of chronic illnesses such as diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular diseases - all of which become more prevalent with increasing age. <br/>Home monitoring technology allows healthcare providers to monitor chronic disease its use is projected to exponentially expand - serving over seven million people by 2010. Research suggests that although home monitoring has many benefits, the challenge with effective remote integration lies in its use in everyday settings. Telemonitoring in a patient's home becomes a part of daily activities and is a window into the privacy of his or her life. However, little is known about how monitoring technology intersects with the cultural needs of the population that is being served. Remote technology can improve the efficiency of serving the health needs of a large population, however, cultural concerns must be considered to achieve effective care. <br/>METHODS: The literature was reviewed for technologies that are most frequently used. A synthesis of our knowledge of these technologies by examining their congruence with the cultural needs of elderly Hispanics was generated. Examples were identified of factors to be considered in the design of technological innovations used to help Hispanic elderly patients age in their homes. <br/>RESULTS: Trust, time orientation, tradition, language, and perception of being a burden are examples of factors which can influence the use of remote monitoring. Additionally, mobility and connectivity are extremely influential factors because Hispanics are one of the largest users of Broadband in the U.S.; however they trail other U.S. populations in Internet use. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: As healthcare practices and reimbursement move forward to embrace remote home care practices, agencies will need to carefully consider the cultural concerns of elderly Hispanics. Similar technologies may appear to have similar effectiveness - but there may be differences in how one or the other may be integrated in to the care for a particular cultural or age group. In order to provide the most effective care, providers will need to consider cultural factors to best promote the health of the patients served. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:44:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:44:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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