PERCEIVED BARRIERS & SOCIAL SUPPORT ASSOCIATED WITH PHYSICAL ACTIVITY OF WORKING WOMEN

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157291
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PERCEIVED BARRIERS & SOCIAL SUPPORT ASSOCIATED WITH PHYSICAL ACTIVITY OF WORKING WOMEN
Abstract:
PERCEIVED BARRIERS & SOCIAL SUPPORT ASSOCIATED WITH PHYSICAL ACTIVITY OF WORKING WOMEN
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Thongtanunam, Yupawan, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:OHSU
Title:PhD Student
Contact Address:1011 SW Curry st, #8, Portland, OR, 97239, USA
Co-Authors:Catherine Salveson
PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this study was to: 1) describe physical activity (PA) among Thai working women and selected psycho-social factors including perceived benefits of PA, perceived barriers to PA, perceived social support for PA, and perceived self-efficacy to overcome those barriers; and 2) to explore the relationship of their PA and these psycho-social factors.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Cardio vascular disease (CVD) has become the leading causes of mortality and morbidity among middle-aged women in Thailand. A preponderance of evidence supports that physical inactivity is a major risk factor. Despite support for the benefits of PA in prevention of CVD, it is increasingly clear that some middle-aged women in urban area still report low participation in regular exercise or moderate PA. PenderÆs Health Promotion Model (1996) offered a guide for exploration of the complex bio-psycho-social process that motivates an individual to engage in behaviors directed toward the enhancement of their health. Among Thai women, exercise participation was found to be significantly associated with perceptions of benefits of, barriers to, self-efficacy, and social support for exercise. However, there is no evidence of the relationship among all of these factors and overall PA.
METHODS: The sample consisted of 45 office-based-working-women who participated in a Study of Using Motivational Interviewing for Promoting Physical Activity among Middle-aged Working Women in Thailand. Descriptive statistic were used to describe their total time for PA, energy expenditure for PA, perceived benefits and barriers, self-efficacy, and social support for PA. The Pearson Correlations was used to analyze the relationship between these psycho-social factors and PA outcomes.
RESULTS: The mean age of the sample was 44 (range=40-53). Most women reported having low PA at work, of which 53% reported sitting/ standing with some walking and 47% reported mainly sitting with slight arm movement. Based on their BMI, 27.4% of them were overweight and obese (19.6% and 7.8%). The average total minutes for PA per week was 422.39 minutes (SD=320.66) and the average total energy expenditure from PA per week were 1514.80 calories (SD=1236.84). The average of energy expenditure for their moderate PA per week was 1079.53 calories (SD= 990.30) and 122.03 calories from vigorous PA (SD=272.54). Walking represented one third of the energy expenditures per week for moderate PA in these women (M=313.23, SD=483.27). For psycho-social factors, women reported high level of perceived benefit (M=3.23, SD=.35) and low level of perceived barriers (M=1.94, SD= .44); while reporting medium perceptions of social support (M=2.17, SD= .69) and self-efficacy (M=2.34, SD=.57). Additionally, the total minutes for walking were negatively significantly associated with the perceived barriers to being physically active (r= -.42, p-value=.005); whereas the total minutes for overall PA were statistically significantly associated with their perceived social support (r=.36, p-value=.016). Neither perceived benefit nor self-efficacy associated significantly with PA among these women.
IMPLICATIONS: Providing a health promotion program which aims to decrease womenÆs perceptions of barriers to being physically active, and includes social support from family and friend may encourage middle-aged Thai working women to increase their physical activity to prevent cardiovascular disease.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePERCEIVED BARRIERS & SOCIAL SUPPORT ASSOCIATED WITH PHYSICAL ACTIVITY OF WORKING WOMENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157291-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">PERCEIVED BARRIERS &amp; SOCIAL SUPPORT ASSOCIATED WITH PHYSICAL ACTIVITY OF WORKING WOMEN</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thongtanunam, Yupawan, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">OHSU</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1011 SW Curry st, #8, Portland, OR, 97239, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">thongtan@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Catherine Salveson</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this study was to: 1) describe physical activity (PA) among Thai working women and selected psycho-social factors including perceived benefits of PA, perceived barriers to PA, perceived social support for PA, and perceived self-efficacy to overcome those barriers; and 2) to explore the relationship of their PA and these psycho-social factors.<br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Cardio vascular disease (CVD) has become the leading causes of mortality and morbidity among middle-aged women in Thailand. A preponderance of evidence supports that physical inactivity is a major risk factor. Despite support for the benefits of PA in prevention of CVD, it is increasingly clear that some middle-aged women in urban area still report low participation in regular exercise or moderate PA. Pender&AElig;s Health Promotion Model (1996) offered a guide for exploration of the complex bio-psycho-social process that motivates an individual to engage in behaviors directed toward the enhancement of their health. Among Thai women, exercise participation was found to be significantly associated with perceptions of benefits of, barriers to, self-efficacy, and social support for exercise. However, there is no evidence of the relationship among all of these factors and overall PA.<br/>METHODS: The sample consisted of 45 office-based-working-women who participated in a Study of Using Motivational Interviewing for Promoting Physical Activity among Middle-aged Working Women in Thailand. Descriptive statistic were used to describe their total time for PA, energy expenditure for PA, perceived benefits and barriers, self-efficacy, and social support for PA. The Pearson Correlations was used to analyze the relationship between these psycho-social factors and PA outcomes.<br/>RESULTS: The mean age of the sample was 44 (range=40-53). Most women reported having low PA at work, of which 53% reported sitting/ standing with some walking and 47% reported mainly sitting with slight arm movement. Based on their BMI, 27.4% of them were overweight and obese (19.6% and 7.8%). The average total minutes for PA per week was 422.39 minutes (SD=320.66) and the average total energy expenditure from PA per week were 1514.80 calories (SD=1236.84). The average of energy expenditure for their moderate PA per week was 1079.53 calories (SD= 990.30) and 122.03 calories from vigorous PA (SD=272.54). Walking represented one third of the energy expenditures per week for moderate PA in these women (M=313.23, SD=483.27). For psycho-social factors, women reported high level of perceived benefit (M=3.23, SD=.35) and low level of perceived barriers (M=1.94, SD= .44); while reporting medium perceptions of social support (M=2.17, SD= .69) and self-efficacy (M=2.34, SD=.57). Additionally, the total minutes for walking were negatively significantly associated with the perceived barriers to being physically active (r= -.42, p-value=.005); whereas the total minutes for overall PA were statistically significantly associated with their perceived social support (r=.36, p-value=.016). Neither perceived benefit nor self-efficacy associated significantly with PA among these women.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: Providing a health promotion program which aims to decrease women&AElig;s perceptions of barriers to being physically active, and includes social support from family and friend may encourage middle-aged Thai working women to increase their physical activity to prevent cardiovascular disease.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:44:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:44:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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