2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157294
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EATING DISORDERS NURSING: ROLES, SKILLS, AND THE THERAPEUTIC ALLIANCE
Abstract:
EATING DISORDERS NURSING: ROLES, SKILLS, AND THE THERAPEUTIC ALLIANCE
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Weekes, Kirsti A., RN, BA, BScN, MScN
P.I. Institution Name:The Ottawa Hospital
Title:Advanced Practice Nurse
Contact Address:501 Smyth Rd., Room 4431, Ottawa, ON, K1H 8L6, Canada
Co-Authors:Christine McPherson; Dianne Groll; Jennifer Hague
The role of the nurse caring for eating disorders (ED) patients has varied over the years, yet limited attempts have been made to clearly define this role. This lack of definition is due in part to the fact that this role has been expanded in recent years, focusing on the psychosocial and therapeutic aspects of care, in addition to meeting the physical needs of this complex patient population. It has been suggested that one component of the ED nurses' role is the development of a therapeutic relationship or alliance with the patient. The ED nurse is central in the treatment of patients with ED because nurses often have the most continuous patient contact and the greatest opportunity to interact and develop a relationship with the patient.
Through the development of a therapeutic relationship with the patient based on caring, respect, and empathy, an improvement in the patientÆs treatment outcome can result. The purpose of this study was twofold: 1) to identify the perspectives of ED nurses regarding their role, comparing a variety of sites/types of treatment and 2) to develop a comprehensive description of the ED nurses role to aid in the development of training programs and assist with program development and evaluation. The aims of the study were to identify roles, skills, and approaches used in ED nursing and to explore the nurse-patient relationship and whether the development of a therapeutic alliance is part of that role. A mixed method study was conducted to gain an understanding of the role of the eating disorders (ED) nurse and to explore the nurse-patient therapeutic alliance in this context. Thirty-five nurses from six ED treatment centers in Canada and the United States participated. The qualitative component involved manifest and latent content analyses of semi-structured interviews. Nine nursing roles were identified in addition to ED nursing skills. Three themes emerged in relation to the therapeutic alliance: creating a therapeutic environment, establishing a connection, and empowering patients. The quantitative component consisted of an established measure of therapeutic alliance in questionnaire form. Results from the survey supported the qualitative findings in identifying differences between Canadian and American nurses. Implications for nursing practice that arose from of this study highlighted the strong need to develop a comprehensive training program for nurses working with ED patients. The findings indicated that ED training should focus on fundamental clinical and mental health nursing skills, group facilitation, and nutrition. Strong emphasis should be placed on the interpersonal component of a training program, stressing the need to develop an alliance with the patient based on trust, empathy, and support.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEATING DISORDERS NURSING: ROLES, SKILLS, AND THE THERAPEUTIC ALLIANCEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157294-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">EATING DISORDERS NURSING: ROLES, SKILLS, AND THE THERAPEUTIC ALLIANCE</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Weekes, Kirsti A., RN, BA, BScN, MScN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Ottawa Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Advanced Practice Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">501 Smyth Rd., Room 4431, Ottawa, ON, K1H 8L6, Canada</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kweekes@ottawahospital.on.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Christine McPherson; Dianne Groll; Jennifer Hague</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The role of the nurse caring for eating disorders (ED) patients has varied over the years, yet limited attempts have been made to clearly define this role. This lack of definition is due in part to the fact that this role has been expanded in recent years, focusing on the psychosocial and therapeutic aspects of care, in addition to meeting the physical needs of this complex patient population. It has been suggested that one component of the ED nurses' role is the development of a therapeutic relationship or alliance with the patient. The ED nurse is central in the treatment of patients with ED because nurses often have the most continuous patient contact and the greatest opportunity to interact and develop a relationship with the patient. <br/>Through the development of a therapeutic relationship with the patient based on caring, respect, and empathy, an improvement in the patient&AElig;s treatment outcome can result. The purpose of this study was twofold: 1) to identify the perspectives of ED nurses regarding their role, comparing a variety of sites/types of treatment and 2) to develop a comprehensive description of the ED nurses role to aid in the development of training programs and assist with program development and evaluation. The aims of the study were to identify roles, skills, and approaches used in ED nursing and to explore the nurse-patient relationship and whether the development of a therapeutic alliance is part of that role. A mixed method study was conducted to gain an understanding of the role of the eating disorders (ED) nurse and to explore the nurse-patient therapeutic alliance in this context. Thirty-five nurses from six ED treatment centers in Canada and the United States participated. The qualitative component involved manifest and latent content analyses of semi-structured interviews. Nine nursing roles were identified in addition to ED nursing skills. Three themes emerged in relation to the therapeutic alliance: creating a therapeutic environment, establishing a connection, and empowering patients. The quantitative component consisted of an established measure of therapeutic alliance in questionnaire form. Results from the survey supported the qualitative findings in identifying differences between Canadian and American nurses. Implications for nursing practice that arose from of this study highlighted the strong need to develop a comprehensive training program for nurses working with ED patients. The findings indicated that ED training should focus on fundamental clinical and mental health nursing skills, group facilitation, and nutrition. Strong emphasis should be placed on the interpersonal component of a training program, stressing the need to develop an alliance with the patient based on trust, empathy, and support. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:44:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:44:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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