2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157295
Type:
Presentation
Title:
HYPERTENSION KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES AND ACCULTURATION IN FILIPINO AMERICANS
Abstract:
HYPERTENSION KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES AND ACCULTURATION IN FILIPINO AMERICANS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Weir, Janet, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, Los Angeles
Title:RN-MSN Bridge Student
Contact Address:700 Tiverton Ave; 4-242 Factor Bldg, Box 956918, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6918, USA
Co-Authors:Aurelia Macabasco-O'Connell; Crystal DeGuzman; Lidia Michel
PURPOSE/AIMS: The purpose of this study is to explore hypertension (HTN) knowledge and attitudes in the Filipino American (FA) population and its relationships with acculturation.
BACKGROUND: Hypertension has been identified as a major public health problem within the Filipino American (FA) population. Filipino Americans are the second largest Asian ethnic group in the United States, with the largest group living in California. Compared to the overall California hypertension prevalence of 24.4%, FA have a prevalence of 26.6%, second only to the 33.3% of African Americans. Although heart disease and stroke account for 60% of the deaths in FA, very little has been published about FA health. Hypertension knowledge, and attitudes are important modifiable factors, playing a vital role in controlling HTN. Population-based programs for increasing awareness of HTN have proven to be beneficial in reducing the burden of HTN. Assessing knowledge and awareness in FA may be useful in developing culturally sensitive educational programs in this population.
METHODS: This descriptive, cross-sectional study aims to recruit 30 FA over the age of 30 years. Recruitment is conducted at various local Filipino markets during HTN screenings. Potential subjects complete a short questionnaire including sociodemographic data and medical history including height, weight, waist circumference, and blood pressure (BP) measurements. Subjects undergo an interview utilizing a Cardiovascular Risk Factor Survey with four major components: knowledge, attitudes, acculturation, and educational preferences. Acculturation is based on a modified 10-item Short Acculturation Scale for Filipino Americans (ASASFA) measuring language use and preference, media language use and preference, and social relations. Scores range from 10-50 with higher scores denoting higher levels of acculturation.
RESULTS: A sample of 24 FA subjects (n=24) have been enrolled into the study (mean age 60 +/- 12 years, 46% female, 74% married, 61% with health insurance, 65% unemployed, and 65% with annual incomes <$15,000). Mean systolic BP 133 +/- 23 mm Hg; diastolic BP 75 +/- 12 mm Hg; waist circumference 38 +/- 4 inches. Many reported high levels of HTN knowledge (65%), 74% report they can do something to lower HTN, and 78% reported the most desirable BP as <120/80. Sixty percent reported low acculturation with mean total ASASFA score 24 +/- 6. This research is still in progress.
IMPLICATIONS: Preliminary findings suggest that rates of HTN within this sample are high despite high levels of knowledge regarding HTN. Further, acculturation is low which may contribute to decreased BP control. RESULTS: of this study show that this low income, low acculturated sample of FA may benefit from culturally sensitive community based educational programs discussing HTN in the context of FAÆs specific risk factors and culture.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHYPERTENSION KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES AND ACCULTURATION IN FILIPINO AMERICANSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157295-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">HYPERTENSION KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES AND ACCULTURATION IN FILIPINO AMERICANS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Weir, Janet, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, Los Angeles</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">RN-MSN Bridge Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">700 Tiverton Ave; 4-242 Factor Bldg, Box 956918, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6918, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">warren007@mac.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Aurelia Macabasco-O'Connell; Crystal DeGuzman; Lidia Michel</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE/AIMS: The purpose of this study is to explore hypertension (HTN) knowledge and attitudes in the Filipino American (FA) population and its relationships with acculturation.<br/>BACKGROUND: Hypertension has been identified as a major public health problem within the Filipino American (FA) population. Filipino Americans are the second largest Asian ethnic group in the United States, with the largest group living in California. Compared to the overall California hypertension prevalence of 24.4%, FA have a prevalence of 26.6%, second only to the 33.3% of African Americans. Although heart disease and stroke account for 60% of the deaths in FA, very little has been published about FA health. Hypertension knowledge, and attitudes are important modifiable factors, playing a vital role in controlling HTN. Population-based programs for increasing awareness of HTN have proven to be beneficial in reducing the burden of HTN. Assessing knowledge and awareness in FA may be useful in developing culturally sensitive educational programs in this population.<br/>METHODS: This descriptive, cross-sectional study aims to recruit 30 FA over the age of 30 years. Recruitment is conducted at various local Filipino markets during HTN screenings. Potential subjects complete a short questionnaire including sociodemographic data and medical history including height, weight, waist circumference, and blood pressure (BP) measurements. Subjects undergo an interview utilizing a Cardiovascular Risk Factor Survey with four major components: knowledge, attitudes, acculturation, and educational preferences. Acculturation is based on a modified 10-item Short Acculturation Scale for Filipino Americans (ASASFA) measuring language use and preference, media language use and preference, and social relations. Scores range from 10-50 with higher scores denoting higher levels of acculturation. <br/>RESULTS: A sample of 24 FA subjects (n=24) have been enrolled into the study (mean age 60 +/- 12 years, 46% female, 74% married, 61% with health insurance, 65% unemployed, and 65% with annual incomes &lt;$15,000). Mean systolic BP 133 +/- 23 mm Hg; diastolic BP 75 +/- 12 mm Hg; waist circumference 38 +/- 4 inches. Many reported high levels of HTN knowledge (65%), 74% report they can do something to lower HTN, and 78% reported the most desirable BP as &lt;120/80. Sixty percent reported low acculturation with mean total ASASFA score 24 +/- 6. This research is still in progress.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: Preliminary findings suggest that rates of HTN within this sample are high despite high levels of knowledge regarding HTN. Further, acculturation is low which may contribute to decreased BP control. RESULTS: of this study show that this low income, low acculturated sample of FA may benefit from culturally sensitive community based educational programs discussing HTN in the context of FA&AElig;s specific risk factors and culture.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:44:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:44:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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