2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157296
Type:
Presentation
Title:
BONE MINERAL DENSITY INFLUENCE ON HEALTH BEHAVIOR IN MALE ATHLETES
Abstract:
BONE MINERAL DENSITY INFLUENCE ON HEALTH BEHAVIOR IN MALE ATHLETES
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Weng, Zhongqi, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:UCLA School of Nursing
Title:Undergraduate student
Contact Address:700 TIVERTON AVENUE, 700 Tiverton Avenue, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1702, USA
Co-Authors:Leah FitzGerald
PURPOSES/AIMS: The aim of this study was to determine the role of bone mineral density (BMD) in influencing health related behaviors of serious leisure male athletes at risk for osteoporosis.
BACKGROUND: Osteoporosis is a disease of the skeletal system in which BMD is reduced and bone microarchitecture is deteriorated, leading to decreased bone density and strength, increasing the risk for fracture. Although exercise is generally accepted as having favorable physical and psychological benefits, including promoting bone health and often recommended for both prevention and treatment of low BMD, in some settings, exercise has been negatively associated with BMD values. For example, several studies have demonstrated that non-weigh bearing exercise (i.e. cycling) is negatively associated with BMD values. Serious leisure cyclists are fitness seeking enthusiasts who ride competitively 8 or more hours a week. Limited data exists on BMD and fracture risk in these athletes, and even less data are available on whether BMD results affect serious leisure male athletes' health related behavior and attitude toward bone health.
METHODS: Subjects included 63 healthy male athletes (47 cyclists/16 triathletes) ages18-60 years. Baseline assessments data included measurements of BMD by dual energy x-ray absorptiomtry (DEXA). Questionnaire assessment was made of exercise behavior, caffeine intake, SES, alcohol, education, and marital status. BMD results were reviewed and participants received written materials on osteoporosis, calcium and Vitamin D. Approximately one year following initial DEXA testing, participants were asked to complete an online survey questionnaire to assess any bone health related behavior changes.
RESULTS: 41 of the 63 subjects (65%) responded to the online survey and among them 27 (43%) were classified as having normal bone density, 15 (24%) were classified as osteopenic according to the WHO BMD classification. We found that serious leisure male athletes with low BMD had significantly higher family income (p=0.05) and consumed greater amounts of caffeine (p<0.05) compared to the athletes with normal BMD. No difference between age, ethnicity, education, marital status and alcohol intake was found between the two groups. Online survey results showed that athletes with low BMD were more likely to initiate or increase calcium supplementation (p<0.01), incorporate weight bearing exercises (p= 0.04) and increase the frequency and intensity (p=0.05) of weight bearing exercise compared to men with normal BMD.
IMPLICATIONS: In summary, after learning of their bone density results, serious leisure male athletes with low BMD are more likely to initiate significant health related behavioral changes, however, they are neither more likely to make significant lifestyle changes nor alter the intensity of non-weight bearing exercise. Our form of patient education lead to a significant increase in calcium supplements usage and a trend in increased intensity of weight bearing activity, which over time, may be effective in increasing BMD in these athletes. There needs to be a greater awareness on the clinician and is necessary to assess risk in this population. There is a need for research to examine bone loss in the sub-culture of the "serious leisure" cyclists beyond an over simplistic "one size fits all" interpretation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBONE MINERAL DENSITY INFLUENCE ON HEALTH BEHAVIOR IN MALE ATHLETESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157296-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">BONE MINERAL DENSITY INFLUENCE ON HEALTH BEHAVIOR IN MALE ATHLETES</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Weng, Zhongqi, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UCLA School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Undergraduate student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">700 TIVERTON AVENUE, 700 Tiverton Avenue, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1702, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">zerofish@ucla.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Leah FitzGerald</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: The aim of this study was to determine the role of bone mineral density (BMD) in influencing health related behaviors of serious leisure male athletes at risk for osteoporosis. <br/>BACKGROUND: Osteoporosis is a disease of the skeletal system in which BMD is reduced and bone microarchitecture is deteriorated, leading to decreased bone density and strength, increasing the risk for fracture. Although exercise is generally accepted as having favorable physical and psychological benefits, including promoting bone health and often recommended for both prevention and treatment of low BMD, in some settings, exercise has been negatively associated with BMD values. For example, several studies have demonstrated that non-weigh bearing exercise (i.e. cycling) is negatively associated with BMD values. Serious leisure cyclists are fitness seeking enthusiasts who ride competitively 8 or more hours a week. Limited data exists on BMD and fracture risk in these athletes, and even less data are available on whether BMD results affect serious leisure male athletes' health related behavior and attitude toward bone health. <br/>METHODS: Subjects included 63 healthy male athletes (47 cyclists/16 triathletes) ages18-60 years. Baseline assessments data included measurements of BMD by dual energy x-ray absorptiomtry (DEXA). Questionnaire assessment was made of exercise behavior, caffeine intake, SES, alcohol, education, and marital status. BMD results were reviewed and participants received written materials on osteoporosis, calcium and Vitamin D. Approximately one year following initial DEXA testing, participants were asked to complete an online survey questionnaire to assess any bone health related behavior changes. <br/>RESULTS: 41 of the 63 subjects (65%) responded to the online survey and among them 27 (43%) were classified as having normal bone density, 15 (24%) were classified as osteopenic according to the WHO BMD classification. We found that serious leisure male athletes with low BMD had significantly higher family income (p=0.05) and consumed greater amounts of caffeine (p&lt;0.05) compared to the athletes with normal BMD. No difference between age, ethnicity, education, marital status and alcohol intake was found between the two groups. Online survey results showed that athletes with low BMD were more likely to initiate or increase calcium supplementation (p&lt;0.01), incorporate weight bearing exercises (p= 0.04) and increase the frequency and intensity (p=0.05) of weight bearing exercise compared to men with normal BMD. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: In summary, after learning of their bone density results, serious leisure male athletes with low BMD are more likely to initiate significant health related behavioral changes, however, they are neither more likely to make significant lifestyle changes nor alter the intensity of non-weight bearing exercise. Our form of patient education lead to a significant increase in calcium supplements usage and a trend in increased intensity of weight bearing activity, which over time, may be effective in increasing BMD in these athletes. There needs to be a greater awareness on the clinician and is necessary to assess risk in this population. There is a need for research to examine bone loss in the sub-culture of the &quot;serious leisure&quot; cyclists beyond an over simplistic &quot;one size fits all&quot; interpretation.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:44:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:44:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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