EBP CULTURE, EBP IMPLEMENTATION, AND INTENT TO LEAVE IN NURSES AND HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157298
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EBP CULTURE, EBP IMPLEMENTATION, AND INTENT TO LEAVE IN NURSES AND HEALTH PROFESSIONALS
Abstract:
EBP CULTURE, EBP IMPLEMENTATION, AND INTENT TO LEAVE IN NURSES AND HEALTH PROFESSIONALS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Melnyk, Bernadette, PhD, RN, CPNP/PMHNP, FNAP, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Dean and Distinguished Foundation Professor in Nursing
Contact Address:500 N. 3rd St., Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA
Co-Authors:Ellen Fineout-Overholt; Martha Giggleman
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships among evidence-based practice (EBP) organizational culture, EBP beliefs, EBP implementation and intent to leave in nurses and health professionals in a 359-bed community hospital in Northern California.

BACKGROUND: Although the Institute of Medicine has set the goal that 90 percent of clinical decisions will be evidence-based by 2020, it is estimated that only approximately 10 to 15 percent of nurses and other healthcare providers consistently deliver evidence-based care. Research has identified multiple barriers to EBP; however, studies have not investigated the relationships among EBP organizational culture, EBP beliefs and implementation, and intent to leave in practicing nurses and health professionals. The ARCC (Advancing Research and Clinical practice through close Collaboration) Model provided the conceptual framework for this study.
METHODS: A descriptive correlational study was conducted with 58 nurses and healthcare providers. Participants completed the EBP Beliefs Scale, the EBP Implementation Scale, the Organizational Culture and Readiness for System-Wide Implementation of Evidence-based Practice (OCRSIEP) Scale, and an adapted version of the Intent to Leave Scale.

RESULTS: Approximately 40 percent of the participants had a bachelorÆs degree and 7 percent reported a master's degree as their highest level of education. Thirty-eight percent of the participants were staff nurses and 22 percent were charge nurses. Non-nurses comprised 17 percent of the sample. Organizational culture and readiness for EBP was positively related to clinicians' EBP beliefs and implementation of EBP. Stronger beliefs by clinicians about EBP were related to higher EBP implementation and less intent to leave the organization.

IMPLICATIONS: The extent to which clinicians implement EBP is related to their beliefs about the value of EBP and their ability to implement it. Organizations must cultivate cultures that support EBP in order to strengthen clinicians' beliefs and implementation of evidence-based care. Cultures that support EBP hold promise for retaining staff and reducing turnover rates.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEBP CULTURE, EBP IMPLEMENTATION, AND INTENT TO LEAVE IN NURSES AND HEALTH PROFESSIONALSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157298-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">EBP CULTURE, EBP IMPLEMENTATION, AND INTENT TO LEAVE IN NURSES AND HEALTH PROFESSIONALS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Melnyk, Bernadette, PhD, RN, CPNP/PMHNP, FNAP, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean and Distinguished Foundation Professor in Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 N. 3rd St., Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bernadette.melnyk@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ellen Fineout-Overholt; Martha Giggleman</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships among evidence-based practice (EBP) organizational culture, EBP beliefs, EBP implementation and intent to leave in nurses and health professionals in a 359-bed community hospital in Northern California. <br/> <br/>BACKGROUND: Although the Institute of Medicine has set the goal that 90 percent of clinical decisions will be evidence-based by 2020, it is estimated that only approximately 10 to 15 percent of nurses and other healthcare providers consistently deliver evidence-based care. Research has identified multiple barriers to EBP; however, studies have not investigated the relationships among EBP organizational culture, EBP beliefs and implementation, and intent to leave in practicing nurses and health professionals. The ARCC (Advancing Research and Clinical practice through close Collaboration) Model provided the conceptual framework for this study.<br/> METHODS: A descriptive correlational study was conducted with 58 nurses and healthcare providers. Participants completed the EBP Beliefs Scale, the EBP Implementation Scale, the Organizational Culture and Readiness for System-Wide Implementation of Evidence-based Practice (OCRSIEP) Scale, and an adapted version of the Intent to Leave Scale. <br/> <br/>RESULTS: Approximately 40 percent of the participants had a bachelor&AElig;s degree and 7 percent reported a master's degree as their highest level of education. Thirty-eight percent of the participants were staff nurses and 22 percent were charge nurses. Non-nurses comprised 17 percent of the sample. Organizational culture and readiness for EBP was positively related to clinicians' EBP beliefs and implementation of EBP. Stronger beliefs by clinicians about EBP were related to higher EBP implementation and less intent to leave the organization. <br/> <br/>IMPLICATIONS: The extent to which clinicians implement EBP is related to their beliefs about the value of EBP and their ability to implement it. Organizations must cultivate cultures that support EBP in order to strengthen clinicians' beliefs and implementation of evidence-based care. Cultures that support EBP hold promise for retaining staff and reducing turnover rates. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:44:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:44:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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