2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157299
Type:
Presentation
Title:
DO THEY REALLY CARE? HOW TRAUMA PATIENTS PERCEIVE NURSES' CARING BEHAVIORS
Abstract:
DO THEY REALLY CARE? HOW TRAUMA PATIENTS PERCEIVE NURSES' CARING BEHAVIORS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Merrill, Alison, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Northern Colorado
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Gutner Hall Campus Box 125, Greeley, CO, 80634, USA
Co-Authors:Lory Clukey; Denise Curtis; Janice Hayes
PURPOSE/AIMS: To assess how critically injured trauma patients perceive caring behaviors in their nurses.
BACKGROUND: Nightingale wrote that caring is the foundation of nursing practice. Boykin and Schoenhoffer (1993) developed the theory of Nursing as Caring in which caring is seen as a dynamic process that exists within shared experiences between the nurse and the patient.
The 2008 Essentials of Baccalaureate Education from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing states that nurses practice from a "holistic, caring framework." There is very little research, though, on how caring is perceived by patients, especially those in critical care areas of the health care arena. Research conducted on caring with injured patients has included patients who have fairly minor injuries. Less research has examined how the most critically injured patients perceive caring behaviors in their nurses. Hayes and Tyler-Ball (2007) researched 70 trauma patients to determine their perceptions of nurse caring behaviors using the Caring Behaviors Inventory (CBI), a 42-item questionnaire with a 6-point Likert rating for each item. While they were able to identify which caring behaviors were ranked most highly, and which left some room for improvement, they did not find any differences based on the gender or ethnicity of the patients. The current study utilized the CBI with critically injured trauma patients in a different region of the country.
METHODS: One hundred and five moderately to severely injured adult trauma patients agreed to participate in the study. In a one-to-one interview format a researcher read 42 items describing nursing behaviors from the Caring Behaviors Inventory to the patient and asked the patient to indicate his/her response on a six point scale from "never" to "always."
RESULTS: Patients rated the caring behaviors of the nurses very highly (M=5.45, range of averages 4.52-5.75). The lowest rated items were Touching the patient to communicate caring and Being hopeful for the patient. The highest rated items were Meeting the patient"s stated and unstated needs, Being confident with the patient, and Giving the patient's treatments and medications on time. Factor analysis demonstrated that one factor explained 51.85% of the total variance. The instrument had internal consistency with a Cronbach's alpha of .974. There were significant differences (p=<.05) based on gender with men placing a higher value on Attentively listening to the patient and Putting the patient first. Six items were rated significantly higher in Latino patients but there were only 4 Latinos in the study. However, this finding accords with the data found in a companion family study and bears a closer investigation with a larger Latino sample size in the future.
IMPLICATIONS: Moderately to severely injured patients perceive nurses as caring with differences noted based on gender and ethnicity. The modified Caring Behaviors Inventory is quick to use and is reliable and valid.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDO THEY REALLY CARE? HOW TRAUMA PATIENTS PERCEIVE NURSES' CARING BEHAVIORSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157299-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">DO THEY REALLY CARE? HOW TRAUMA PATIENTS PERCEIVE NURSES' CARING BEHAVIORS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Merrill, Alison, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Northern Colorado</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Gutner Hall Campus Box 125, Greeley, CO, 80634, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">alison.merrill@unco.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lory Clukey; Denise Curtis; Janice Hayes</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE/AIMS: To assess how critically injured trauma patients perceive caring behaviors in their nurses. <br/>BACKGROUND: Nightingale wrote that caring is the foundation of nursing practice. Boykin and Schoenhoffer (1993) developed the theory of Nursing as Caring in which caring is seen as a dynamic process that exists within shared experiences between the nurse and the patient.<br/>The 2008 Essentials of Baccalaureate Education from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing states that nurses practice from a &quot;holistic, caring framework.&quot; There is very little research, though, on how caring is perceived by patients, especially those in critical care areas of the health care arena. Research conducted on caring with injured patients has included patients who have fairly minor injuries. Less research has examined how the most critically injured patients perceive caring behaviors in their nurses. Hayes and Tyler-Ball (2007) researched 70 trauma patients to determine their perceptions of nurse caring behaviors using the Caring Behaviors Inventory (CBI), a 42-item questionnaire with a 6-point Likert rating for each item. While they were able to identify which caring behaviors were ranked most highly, and which left some room for improvement, they did not find any differences based on the gender or ethnicity of the patients. The current study utilized the CBI with critically injured trauma patients in a different region of the country. <br/>METHODS: One hundred and five moderately to severely injured adult trauma patients agreed to participate in the study. In a one-to-one interview format a researcher read 42 items describing nursing behaviors from the Caring Behaviors Inventory to the patient and asked the patient to indicate his/her response on a six point scale from &quot;never&quot; to &quot;always.&quot; <br/>RESULTS: Patients rated the caring behaviors of the nurses very highly (M=5.45, range of averages 4.52-5.75). The lowest rated items were Touching the patient to communicate caring and Being hopeful for the patient. The highest rated items were Meeting the patient&quot;s stated and unstated needs, Being confident with the patient, and Giving the patient's treatments and medications on time. Factor analysis demonstrated that one factor explained 51.85% of the total variance. The instrument had internal consistency with a Cronbach's alpha of .974. There were significant differences (p=&lt;.05) based on gender with men placing a higher value on Attentively listening to the patient and Putting the patient first. Six items were rated significantly higher in Latino patients but there were only 4 Latinos in the study. However, this finding accords with the data found in a companion family study and bears a closer investigation with a larger Latino sample size in the future.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: Moderately to severely injured patients perceive nurses as caring with differences noted based on gender and ethnicity. The modified Caring Behaviors Inventory is quick to use and is reliable and valid. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:44:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:44:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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