2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157301
Type:
Presentation
Title:
GESTATIONAL WEIGHT GAIN IN MEXICAN AMERICAN WOMEN
Abstract:
GESTATIONAL WEIGHT GAIN IN MEXICAN AMERICAN WOMEN
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Mielke, Ruth T., CNM, PhD, (c)
P.I. Institution Name:Azusa Pacific University
Title:PhD Student
Contact Address:701 East Alosta Boulevard, PO Box 7000, Azusa, CA, 91702-7000, USA
Co-Authors:Cheryl Westlake; Catherine Heinlein; Carl Renold
PURPOSE/AIMS: The prevalence and biologic, sociocultural and behavioral characteristics of Mexican American (MA) women in Los Angeles (LA) with adequate and excessive gestational weight gain (EGWG) were studied. RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Excessive GWG is increasingly associated with negative fetal (macrosomia, birth injury) and maternal outcomes [delivery complications, postpartum obesity and associated chronic illnesses (diabetes, heart disease)]. Studies have shown Hispanic women, the fastest growing ethnic minority in the United States (US) demonstrate EGWG; however, MAs, the largest subgroup with the highest fertility/birth rates, have been studied least often. Focused study of factors associated with adequate and EGWG is critical. OremÆs Self-Care Deficit Theory, provides the theoretical concepts that were applied: a) Basic Conditioning Factors [prepregancy body mass index (BMI), age, parity, hypertension, acculturation, paternal education, exercise, and maternal food intake]; c) Self-Care Requisite (achieving adequate GWG) and d) Self-care Deficit (EGWG).
METHODS: A retrospective, cross-sectional, descriptive/correlational design was used. Data was obtained by chart review at a federally qualified health center in metropolitan LA. Following Institutional Review Board approvals, charts with a Hispanic surname and a postpartum visit in 2007 through 2009 were screened for study eligibility (n = 1257). Inclusion criteria were documented birthplace in Mexico or self-reported Mexican origin (born in US), entry into prenatal care by 28 weeks gestation, term gestation (equal to or greater than 36 weeks), and completion of the LA County Department of Public Health form - the Comprehensive Perinatal Services Program Prenatal Combined Assessment Reassessment Tool. Exclusion criteria were thyroid disease, diabetes or multiple gestation. The Institute of Medicine (1990) criteria for pre-pregnancy BMI and appropriate GWG were used. Eligible charts were included for the prevalence analysis (n=681) and charts coded for adequate or excessive GWG (n= 469) were included for the descriptive analysis. RESULTS: The prevalence of adequate GWG was 33% (n=223), inadequate GWG 31% (n=212), and EGWG 36% (246). (Table display not available.) Table headings: Characteristic; Inadequate GWG, n=212; Adequate GWG, n =223; Excessive GWG, n=246; and t. Total GWD (lb):
12.57 +/- .56; 25.76 +/- 5.96; 35.86 +/- 9.65; -13.48**.
Prepregnancy BMI27.93 +/- .43; 25.53 +/- 4.48; 27.74 +/-5.12; - 4.95**.
Age (years): 27.34 +/- .43; 26.21+/- 6.63; 25.68 +/- 6.48; .89.
Compared to MA women with adequate GWG, MA women with EGWG had higher prepregnancy BMI (p <.01), more hypertension (p <.01), were more acculturated (p <.01) and were more often born in the US (p <.01). Alternately, MA women with adequate GWG ate more servings of grains (p <.05), had more snacks per day (p <.05) and had partners with less education (p <.05) than MA women with EGWG. IMPLICATIONS: More than a third of MA women had excessive GWG and higher acculturation, prepregnancy BMI and blood pressure were related to EGWG. Alternately, higher numbers of grain servings and snacks daily were related to adequate GWG. These characteristics in MA women may serve to identify MA women who may be at risk for adequate and EGWG and may suggest areas for intervention development. Further study is warranted n MA women to design strategies that will promote adequate GWG and reduce the risk of lifelong obesity and the associated chronic illnesses.
Funding through an APU Doctoral Dissertation grant is pending.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGESTATIONAL WEIGHT GAIN IN MEXICAN AMERICAN WOMENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157301-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">GESTATIONAL WEIGHT GAIN IN MEXICAN AMERICAN WOMEN</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mielke, Ruth T., CNM, PhD, (c)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Azusa Pacific University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">701 East Alosta Boulevard, PO Box 7000, Azusa, CA, 91702-7000, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rmielke@sbcglobal.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cheryl Westlake; Catherine Heinlein; Carl Renold</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE/AIMS: The prevalence and biologic, sociocultural and behavioral characteristics of Mexican American (MA) women in Los Angeles (LA) with adequate and excessive gestational weight gain (EGWG) were studied. RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Excessive GWG is increasingly associated with negative fetal (macrosomia, birth injury) and maternal outcomes [delivery complications, postpartum obesity and associated chronic illnesses (diabetes, heart disease)]. Studies have shown Hispanic women, the fastest growing ethnic minority in the United States (US) demonstrate EGWG; however, MAs, the largest subgroup with the highest fertility/birth rates, have been studied least often. Focused study of factors associated with adequate and EGWG is critical. Orem&AElig;s Self-Care Deficit Theory, provides the theoretical concepts that were applied: a) Basic Conditioning Factors [prepregancy body mass index (BMI), age, parity, hypertension, acculturation, paternal education, exercise, and maternal food intake]; c) Self-Care Requisite (achieving adequate GWG) and d) Self-care Deficit (EGWG). <br/>METHODS: A retrospective, cross-sectional, descriptive/correlational design was used. Data was obtained by chart review at a federally qualified health center in metropolitan LA. Following Institutional Review Board approvals, charts with a Hispanic surname and a postpartum visit in 2007 through 2009 were screened for study eligibility (n = 1257). Inclusion criteria were documented birthplace in Mexico or self-reported Mexican origin (born in US), entry into prenatal care by 28 weeks gestation, term gestation (equal to or greater than 36 weeks), and completion of the LA County Department of Public Health form - the Comprehensive Perinatal Services Program Prenatal Combined Assessment Reassessment Tool. Exclusion criteria were thyroid disease, diabetes or multiple gestation. The Institute of Medicine (1990) criteria for pre-pregnancy BMI and appropriate GWG were used. Eligible charts were included for the prevalence analysis (n=681) and charts coded for adequate or excessive GWG (n= 469) were included for the descriptive analysis. RESULTS: The prevalence of adequate GWG was 33% (n=223), inadequate GWG 31% (n=212), and EGWG 36% (246). (Table display not available.) Table headings: Characteristic; Inadequate GWG, n=212; Adequate GWG, n =223; Excessive GWG, n=246; and t. Total GWD (lb): <br/>12.57 +/- .56; 25.76 +/- 5.96; 35.86 +/- 9.65; -13.48**.<br/>Prepregnancy BMI27.93 +/- .43; 25.53 +/- 4.48; 27.74 +/-5.12; - 4.95**.<br/>Age (years): 27.34 +/- .43; 26.21+/- 6.63; 25.68 +/- 6.48; .89.<br/>Compared to MA women with adequate GWG, MA women with EGWG had higher prepregnancy BMI (p &lt;.01), more hypertension (p &lt;.01), were more acculturated (p &lt;.01) and were more often born in the US (p &lt;.01). Alternately, MA women with adequate GWG ate more servings of grains (p &lt;.05), had more snacks per day (p &lt;.05) and had partners with less education (p &lt;.05) than MA women with EGWG. IMPLICATIONS: More than a third of MA women had excessive GWG and higher acculturation, prepregnancy BMI and blood pressure were related to EGWG. Alternately, higher numbers of grain servings and snacks daily were related to adequate GWG. These characteristics in MA women may serve to identify MA women who may be at risk for adequate and EGWG and may suggest areas for intervention development. Further study is warranted n MA women to design strategies that will promote adequate GWG and reduce the risk of lifelong obesity and the associated chronic illnesses.<br/>Funding through an APU Doctoral Dissertation grant is pending.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:44:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:44:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.