2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157303
Type:
Presentation
Title:
OBESITY INTERVENTION THEMES FROM MULTI-ETHNIC PARENT-TEEN DYAD INTERVIEWS
Abstract:
OBESITY INTERVENTION THEMES FROM MULTI-ETHNIC PARENT-TEEN DYAD INTERVIEWS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Montoya, Carolyn, RN, MSN, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico
Title:Instructor
Contact Address:MSCO9 5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131, USA
Co-Authors:Alberta Kong; Andrew Sussman
BACKGROUND: Prevalence rate for obese teens (12- 19 years) increased from 5 % in 1976-1989 to 17.4 % in 2003-2004; 28% of non-Hispanic Black and 20% of Mexican American girls (12- 19 years) are obese as compared to 11% of their White counterparts. By 2030, it is estimated that approximately 41% of Mexican-American boys and Black teen girls will be obese, a full 10% higher than the general population. Disorders, such as type II diabetes, formerly termed adult on-set diabetes, is now becoming an epidemic in the teenage population. Because of the increasing prevalence of obesity and associated chronic disorders, culturally relevant and age-appropriate obesity intervention strategies are critically needed.
PURPOSE AND AIMS Using an adaptation of a community-based participatory research process, we collected formative research data to assist with creation, implementation and evaluation of an obesity intervention known as Adolescents Committed to Improvement of Nutrition and Physical Activity (ACTION). ACTION is a school-based health center intervention created for high schools in a large southwestern urban city aimed at achieving a healthier weight through improving diet and increasing physical activity.
Sample Participants were recruited from 2 high schools with school-based health centers. A convenience sample with 8 parents of overweight/obese (OW/OB) high school students and 7 OW/OB students were interviewed. Parents included, 6 female, mean age 45 yrs.; 3 Hispanics, 2 African Americans, 1 Native American, 1 Non-Hispanic white and 1 other. Students included, 4 female, mean age 16 yrs.; 4 Hispanics, 2 African Americans, and 1 Non-Hispanic white.

METHODS: Semi-structured interviews, neutral to adolescent obesity, lasting approximately 60 minutes, were conducted in Spanish or English. Interviews were conducted primarily in the participantÆs homes and participants received $20 for their time. After interviews were transcribed, an iterative analytic process was used to identify key themes with comparisons made between adolescent and parent responses. NVivo8 was used to facilitate text retrieval and coding.
RESULTS: Three major themes were identified from the interviews: motivation, barriers and challenges, and venues to facilitate change. Parent and teen similarities and differences within these themes were noted. Similarities identified included lack of healthy food options and infrequent curricular/extracurricular physical activity. Differences included communication strategies (ôtextingö essential for teens; parents saw ôtextingö as a fad) and role modeling (teens identified friends as role models; parents identified themselves as primary role models).
IMPLICATIONS: Themes identified through a formative process using community-based participatory research approach were essential to develop a culturally and age-appropriate obesity intervention. Intervention materials include a clinician toolkit to use during clinical encounters with OW/OB teens and a nutrition and physical activity DVD for teens to use at home with their family members. The efficacy trail is currently on-going.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOBESITY INTERVENTION THEMES FROM MULTI-ETHNIC PARENT-TEEN DYAD INTERVIEWSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157303-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">OBESITY INTERVENTION THEMES FROM MULTI-ETHNIC PARENT-TEEN DYAD INTERVIEWS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Montoya, Carolyn, RN, MSN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MSCO9 5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cjmontoya@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Alberta Kong; Andrew Sussman</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND: Prevalence rate for obese teens (12- 19 years) increased from 5 % in 1976-1989 to 17.4 % in 2003-2004; 28% of non-Hispanic Black and 20% of Mexican American girls (12- 19 years) are obese as compared to 11% of their White counterparts. By 2030, it is estimated that approximately 41% of Mexican-American boys and Black teen girls will be obese, a full 10% higher than the general population. Disorders, such as type II diabetes, formerly termed adult on-set diabetes, is now becoming an epidemic in the teenage population. Because of the increasing prevalence of obesity and associated chronic disorders, culturally relevant and age-appropriate obesity intervention strategies are critically needed.<br/>PURPOSE AND AIMS Using an adaptation of a community-based participatory research process, we collected formative research data to assist with creation, implementation and evaluation of an obesity intervention known as Adolescents Committed to Improvement of Nutrition and Physical Activity (ACTION). ACTION is a school-based health center intervention created for high schools in a large southwestern urban city aimed at achieving a healthier weight through improving diet and increasing physical activity.<br/>Sample Participants were recruited from 2 high schools with school-based health centers. A convenience sample with 8 parents of overweight/obese (OW/OB) high school students and 7 OW/OB students were interviewed. Parents included, 6 female, mean age 45 yrs.; 3 Hispanics, 2 African Americans, 1 Native American, 1 Non-Hispanic white and 1 other. Students included, 4 female, mean age 16 yrs.; 4 Hispanics, 2 African Americans, and 1 Non-Hispanic white. <br/><br/>METHODS: Semi-structured interviews, neutral to adolescent obesity, lasting approximately 60 minutes, were conducted in Spanish or English. Interviews were conducted primarily in the participant&AElig;s homes and participants received $20 for their time. After interviews were transcribed, an iterative analytic process was used to identify key themes with comparisons made between adolescent and parent responses. NVivo8 was used to facilitate text retrieval and coding. <br/>RESULTS: Three major themes were identified from the interviews: motivation, barriers and challenges, and venues to facilitate change. Parent and teen similarities and differences within these themes were noted. Similarities identified included lack of healthy food options and infrequent curricular/extracurricular physical activity. Differences included communication strategies (&ocirc;texting&ouml; essential for teens; parents saw &ocirc;texting&ouml; as a fad) and role modeling (teens identified friends as role models; parents identified themselves as primary role models).<br/>IMPLICATIONS: Themes identified through a formative process using community-based participatory research approach were essential to develop a culturally and age-appropriate obesity intervention. Intervention materials include a clinician toolkit to use during clinical encounters with OW/OB teens and a nutrition and physical activity DVD for teens to use at home with their family members. The efficacy trail is currently on-going. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:45:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:45:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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