2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157305
Type:
Presentation
Title:
HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT OF HISPANIC AMERICAN TRUCK DRIVERS: A PILOT STUDY
Abstract:
HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT OF HISPANIC AMERICAN TRUCK DRIVERS: A PILOT STUDY
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Mullins, Iris L., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:New Mexico State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:PO Box 30001, MSC 3185, Las Cruces, NM, 88003-8001, USA
Co-Authors:Trish O'Day
PURPOSE/AIMS: The purpose of this study was to determine health risks of Hispanic American and non-Hispanic American male truck drivers. The aims were to: 1. Identify health risks of short and long haul male truck drivers using the Self Care Inventory (SCI). 2. Identify health-promoting behaviors used by truck drivers that can be incorporated into the future development of a health promotion intervention focused at risk reduction appropriate for type of truck driver (short haul or long haul). 3. Validate the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II (HPLPII) as an appropriate instrument to use with Hispanic American males.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Professional truck drivers are a high risk population for health risks such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension, sexually transmitted diseases, obesity, stress, tobacco use, alcohol use, drug use, and sleep deprivation. Hispanic American drivers may have risks related to heredity and health disparities. PenderÆs Health Promotion Model provided the framework for this study.
METHODS: A descriptive correlational design was used. Survey methods including standardized and demographic instruments, measurements of height, weight, blood pressure, pulse, and calculated BMI were used. Data was collected at New Mexico State University and at truck stops along the I-10 and I-25 corridor between El Paso, Texas and Las Cruces, New Mexico. The researcher (PI), a bilingual graduate nursing student, and a male graduate research assistant comprised the research data collection team. All data collected from participants is kept confidential and is being reported as group data.

RESULTS: 127 drivers participated in the study ranging in age from 20-71. Based on Diastolic BP 93 drivers readings fell in the Pre-Hypertension, Stage I or Stage II Hypertension and based on both systolic and diastolic readings combined 11 driversÆ BP fell in normal range and 116 drivers were in the Pre-hypertension, Stage I or Stage II categories. Calculation of BMI revealed that 1 driver was underweight, 15 drivers had healthy weights and that 109 drivers weights were Class I, II, III, and overweight categories. There were 48 Hispanic/Latino/Mexican American drivers in the study. In comparing long haul, short haul, and mixed haul Hispanic drivers responses there was no significant differences in these driver groupsÆ responses for the subcategories nutrition, physical activity, health responsibility, interpersonal relationships, spiritual growth, and stress management of the Lifestyles Profile II or for the Self Care Inventory.
IMPLICATIONS: Drivers identified ways they are incorporating exercise into their daily routines which can be used in health promotion educational materials Health promotion research and programs targeted at this population need to focus on risk factors for health problems included poor diet and lack of exercise to assist drivers with developing healthy lifestyle programs. Drivers identified problems with high food costs, locating healthy foods, and lack of exercise facilities at or near truck stops. Data from the pilot study will be used to develop a health promotion program focused at weight reduction and blood pressure for businesses employing truck drivers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT OF HISPANIC AMERICAN TRUCK DRIVERS: A PILOT STUDYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157305-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT OF HISPANIC AMERICAN TRUCK DRIVERS: A PILOT STUDY</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mullins, Iris L., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">New Mexico State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 30001, MSC 3185, Las Cruces, NM, 88003-8001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">imullins@nmsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Trish O'Day</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE/AIMS: The purpose of this study was to determine health risks of Hispanic American and non-Hispanic American male truck drivers. The aims were to: 1. Identify health risks of short and long haul male truck drivers using the Self Care Inventory (SCI). 2. Identify health-promoting behaviors used by truck drivers that can be incorporated into the future development of a health promotion intervention focused at risk reduction appropriate for type of truck driver (short haul or long haul). 3. Validate the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II (HPLPII) as an appropriate instrument to use with Hispanic American males.<br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Professional truck drivers are a high risk population for health risks such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension, sexually transmitted diseases, obesity, stress, tobacco use, alcohol use, drug use, and sleep deprivation. Hispanic American drivers may have risks related to heredity and health disparities. Pender&AElig;s Health Promotion Model provided the framework for this study. <br/>METHODS: A descriptive correlational design was used. Survey methods including standardized and demographic instruments, measurements of height, weight, blood pressure, pulse, and calculated BMI were used. Data was collected at New Mexico State University and at truck stops along the I-10 and I-25 corridor between El Paso, Texas and Las Cruces, New Mexico. The researcher (PI), a bilingual graduate nursing student, and a male graduate research assistant comprised the research data collection team. All data collected from participants is kept confidential and is being reported as group data. <br/><br/>RESULTS: 127 drivers participated in the study ranging in age from 20-71. Based on Diastolic BP 93 drivers readings fell in the Pre-Hypertension, Stage I or Stage II Hypertension and based on both systolic and diastolic readings combined 11 drivers&AElig; BP fell in normal range and 116 drivers were in the Pre-hypertension, Stage I or Stage II categories. Calculation of BMI revealed that 1 driver was underweight, 15 drivers had healthy weights and that 109 drivers weights were Class I, II, III, and overweight categories. There were 48 Hispanic/Latino/Mexican American drivers in the study. In comparing long haul, short haul, and mixed haul Hispanic drivers responses there was no significant differences in these driver groups&AElig; responses for the subcategories nutrition, physical activity, health responsibility, interpersonal relationships, spiritual growth, and stress management of the Lifestyles Profile II or for the Self Care Inventory.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: Drivers identified ways they are incorporating exercise into their daily routines which can be used in health promotion educational materials Health promotion research and programs targeted at this population need to focus on risk factors for health problems included poor diet and lack of exercise to assist drivers with developing healthy lifestyle programs. Drivers identified problems with high food costs, locating healthy foods, and lack of exercise facilities at or near truck stops. Data from the pilot study will be used to develop a health promotion program focused at weight reduction and blood pressure for businesses employing truck drivers.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:45:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:45:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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