STRESS, HARDINESS AND LEADERSHIP STYLE: FACTORS THAT FOSTER NURSE MANAGER SURVIVAL

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157307
Type:
Presentation
Title:
STRESS, HARDINESS AND LEADERSHIP STYLE: FACTORS THAT FOSTER NURSE MANAGER SURVIVAL
Abstract:
STRESS, HARDINESS AND LEADERSHIP STYLE: FACTORS THAT FOSTER NURSE MANAGER SURVIVAL
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Nash, Sarah E., BSN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Sharp Grossmont Hospital
Title:Nurse Manager
Contact Address:5555 Grossmont Center Drive, La Mesa, CA, 92019, USA
Co-Authors:Jaynelle Stichler
INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND: Conditions of stress are inherent to the clinical work environment. Nurse manager stress can result in negative behaviors, such as decreased sensitivity to others, and decreased supportive behaviors. The personality variable, hardiness, is one factor that helps to moderate stress. Hardiness is characterized by adaptability and the capability to set and appreciate high standards that also serve to enhance the ability to succeed as a leader. Nurse managers provide the link between upper management and the frontline staff. Effective leadership is essential to any organization. Transformational leaders are those that are charismatic, encouraging, communicative and mentoring. The skilled leader is able to maintain a positive outlook in times of stress and model these desired behaviors for staff. It was anticipated that stress would affect hardiness and leadership style.
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among nurse manager stress, hardiness and leadership. The study aimed to identify moderating factors that may decrease manager stress, specifically hardiness and transformational leadership practices.
RESULTS: of this study will provide information for future studies as well as an opportunity to establish leadership education programs that could be developed to address nurse manager stress.
CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: This study is based on the occupational stress model, hardiness theory and contemporary leadership theory. A conceptual model combines these 3 theories to investigate the relationships among the variables of interest: stress, hardiness and leadership style.
METHODS: The study used a cross-sectional correlational design. A convenience non-probability sample was used from a population of all nurse managers from five hospitals in a healthcare system in the southwestern region of the United States. IRB approvals were obtained from SDSU, the healthcare system and each study site. The variables of interest, stress, hardiness and leadership style were conceptually defined through a review of literature and operationalized using measures with known psychometric properties.
RESULTS: The findings indicated that Stress (perceptions of stress scale) was correlated with the total hardiness scale (r=-.499, p< .01); hardiness was correlated with the total leadership practices scale (r=.379, p<.01), but leadership practices were not significantly correlated with stress When controlling for demographic variables that were correlated with leadership practices (perceived stress and hardiness did not significantly effect Leadership practices (LPI) total scale Perceived stress and the total hardiness scale were significantly and negatively correlated (r=-.499, p<.01) Hardiness (total scale) was significantly correlated with the LPI scale total (r=.379, p<.01). Pearson product moment correlations revealed no significant correlations between perceived stress and the total LPI scale nor any of its subscales. Multiple regression analyses were done to determine the strength of leadership practicesÆ (LPI total scale and then all of the subscales) effect on perceived stress as the dependent variable. None of these regressions were significant; therefore, perceived stress did not affect leadership style.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSTRESS, HARDINESS AND LEADERSHIP STYLE: FACTORS THAT FOSTER NURSE MANAGER SURVIVALen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157307-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">STRESS, HARDINESS AND LEADERSHIP STYLE: FACTORS THAT FOSTER NURSE MANAGER SURVIVAL</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nash, Sarah E., BSN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Sharp Grossmont Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Manager</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5555 Grossmont Center Drive, La Mesa, CA, 92019, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sarah.nash@sharp.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jaynelle Stichler</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND: Conditions of stress are inherent to the clinical work environment. Nurse manager stress can result in negative behaviors, such as decreased sensitivity to others, and decreased supportive behaviors. The personality variable, hardiness, is one factor that helps to moderate stress. Hardiness is characterized by adaptability and the capability to set and appreciate high standards that also serve to enhance the ability to succeed as a leader. Nurse managers provide the link between upper management and the frontline staff. Effective leadership is essential to any organization. Transformational leaders are those that are charismatic, encouraging, communicative and mentoring. The skilled leader is able to maintain a positive outlook in times of stress and model these desired behaviors for staff. It was anticipated that stress would affect hardiness and leadership style. <br/>PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among nurse manager stress, hardiness and leadership. The study aimed to identify moderating factors that may decrease manager stress, specifically hardiness and transformational leadership practices. <br/>RESULTS: of this study will provide information for future studies as well as an opportunity to establish leadership education programs that could be developed to address nurse manager stress. <br/>CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: This study is based on the occupational stress model, hardiness theory and contemporary leadership theory. A conceptual model combines these 3 theories to investigate the relationships among the variables of interest: stress, hardiness and leadership style. <br/>METHODS: The study used a cross-sectional correlational design. A convenience non-probability sample was used from a population of all nurse managers from five hospitals in a healthcare system in the southwestern region of the United States. IRB approvals were obtained from SDSU, the healthcare system and each study site. The variables of interest, stress, hardiness and leadership style were conceptually defined through a review of literature and operationalized using measures with known psychometric properties. <br/>RESULTS: The findings indicated that Stress (perceptions of stress scale) was correlated with the total hardiness scale (r=-.499, p&lt; .01); hardiness was correlated with the total leadership practices scale (r=.379, p&lt;.01), but leadership practices were not significantly correlated with stress When controlling for demographic variables that were correlated with leadership practices (perceived stress and hardiness did not significantly effect Leadership practices (LPI) total scale Perceived stress and the total hardiness scale were significantly and negatively correlated (r=-.499, p&lt;.01) Hardiness (total scale) was significantly correlated with the LPI scale total (r=.379, p&lt;.01). Pearson product moment correlations revealed no significant correlations between perceived stress and the total LPI scale nor any of its subscales. Multiple regression analyses were done to determine the strength of leadership practices&AElig; (LPI total scale and then all of the subscales) effect on perceived stress as the dependent variable. None of these regressions were significant; therefore, perceived stress did not affect leadership style.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:45:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:45:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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