2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157308
Type:
Presentation
Title:
END-OF-LIFE CAREGIVING AND PERSONAL GROWTH
Abstract:
END-OF-LIFE CAREGIVING AND PERSONAL GROWTH
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Nelson, Christine A., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health & Science University
Title:Senior Research Associate
Contact Address:3455 SW US Veterans Hospital Road, Mail Code: SN-ORD, Portland, OR, 97239, USA
Co-Authors:Clara C. Pratt; Alexis J. Walker
BACKGROUND: Over the past decade, changes in health, economic, and social policies have shifted the dying process out of hospitals and into the community. Research examining community-based end-of-life caregiving is limited and has largely focused on detrimental effects and outcomes for caregivers. Further, there has been little exploration of the positive effect of caregiving variables on post-bereavement adaptation and personal growth. Research studying the long-term beneficial effects of caregiving and the co-occurrence of both positive and negative perceptions of end-of-life caregiving is warranted.
PURPOSE: This exploratory, descriptive study investigated the relationship of health care management resources and positive and negative end-of-life caregiving perceptions to community-based end-of-life caregivers' personal growth following loss.
Sample: Retrospective, cross-sectional survey data were collected from 144 adult respondents in Lane County, Oregon who reported having provided care for at least one terminally ill person. Data were analyzed using an adapted stress process conceptual framework.
METHODS: Psychometric testing explored two investigator-developed indices related to end-of-life care: a 12-item caregiving inventory designed to measure both positive and negative aspects of caregiving and a 6-item health care management resource index designed to measure health care support for community-based caregiving. Factor analyses substantiated the internal consistencies of the new indices and established that the caregiving inventory was comprised of two conceptually distinct factors, negative caregiving (alpha = .88) and positive caregiving (alpha = .66), while the health care management resource index was comprised of a single factor (alpha = .86). After factor scores were generated, hierarchical multiple regression analysis was undertaken to examine the relationships between health care management resources and positive and negative caregiving in predicting caregivers' personal growth following bereavement. Control variables (age, gender, ethnicity, education, income, and level of caregiving) were entered into the multiple regression model first, the health care management factor score was entered next, and the positive and negative caregiving factor scores were entered last.
RESULTS: As hypothesized, higher levels of health care management resources were associated with more positive caregiving (r = .51, p equal to or less than.001) and higher levels of positive caregiving were associated with greater personal growth (beta =.42, p equal to or less than .01). There was no statistically significant relationship between negative caregiving and personal growth, nor health care management resources and negative caregiving. RESULTS: from this study add to the evidence that positive and negative aspects of caregiving should be conceptualized separately and demonstrate the influence of positive perceptions of end-of-life caregiving experiences on positive long-term bereavement outcomes.
IMPLICATIONS: Findings suggest the value of nursing interventions to address the needs of community-based caregivers. Educational interventions regarding health care management could provide caregivers with information about symptom management, the expected course of terminal illness, the dying process, and available supportive care services and resources. Interventions designed to promote and enhance positive aspects of the end-of-life caregiving experience could employ strategies to promote positive coping, find meaning and satisfaction in the caregiving role, and reframe the caregiving situation in a positive light. Such interventions may ultimately promote improved bereavement outcomes and caregiver adaptation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEND-OF-LIFE CAREGIVING AND PERSONAL GROWTHen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157308-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">END-OF-LIFE CAREGIVING AND PERSONAL GROWTH</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nelson, Christine A., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health &amp; Science University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Senior Research Associate</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3455 SW US Veterans Hospital Road, Mail Code: SN-ORD, Portland, OR, 97239, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nelsonch@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Clara C. Pratt; Alexis J. Walker</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND: Over the past decade, changes in health, economic, and social policies have shifted the dying process out of hospitals and into the community. Research examining community-based end-of-life caregiving is limited and has largely focused on detrimental effects and outcomes for caregivers. Further, there has been little exploration of the positive effect of caregiving variables on post-bereavement adaptation and personal growth. Research studying the long-term beneficial effects of caregiving and the co-occurrence of both positive and negative perceptions of end-of-life caregiving is warranted.<br/>PURPOSE: This exploratory, descriptive study investigated the relationship of health care management resources and positive and negative end-of-life caregiving perceptions to community-based end-of-life caregivers' personal growth following loss.<br/>Sample: Retrospective, cross-sectional survey data were collected from 144 adult respondents in Lane County, Oregon who reported having provided care for at least one terminally ill person. Data were analyzed using an adapted stress process conceptual framework.<br/>METHODS: Psychometric testing explored two investigator-developed indices related to end-of-life care: a 12-item caregiving inventory designed to measure both positive and negative aspects of caregiving and a 6-item health care management resource index designed to measure health care support for community-based caregiving. Factor analyses substantiated the internal consistencies of the new indices and established that the caregiving inventory was comprised of two conceptually distinct factors, negative caregiving (alpha = .88) and positive caregiving (alpha = .66), while the health care management resource index was comprised of a single factor (alpha = .86). After factor scores were generated, hierarchical multiple regression analysis was undertaken to examine the relationships between health care management resources and positive and negative caregiving in predicting caregivers' personal growth following bereavement. Control variables (age, gender, ethnicity, education, income, and level of caregiving) were entered into the multiple regression model first, the health care management factor score was entered next, and the positive and negative caregiving factor scores were entered last.<br/>RESULTS: As hypothesized, higher levels of health care management resources were associated with more positive caregiving (r = .51, p equal to or less than.001) and higher levels of positive caregiving were associated with greater personal growth (beta =.42, p equal to or less than .01). There was no statistically significant relationship between negative caregiving and personal growth, nor health care management resources and negative caregiving. RESULTS: from this study add to the evidence that positive and negative aspects of caregiving should be conceptualized separately and demonstrate the influence of positive perceptions of end-of-life caregiving experiences on positive long-term bereavement outcomes.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: Findings suggest the value of nursing interventions to address the needs of community-based caregivers. Educational interventions regarding health care management could provide caregivers with information about symptom management, the expected course of terminal illness, the dying process, and available supportive care services and resources. Interventions designed to promote and enhance positive aspects of the end-of-life caregiving experience could employ strategies to promote positive coping, find meaning and satisfaction in the caregiving role, and reframe the caregiving situation in a positive light. Such interventions may ultimately promote improved bereavement outcomes and caregiver adaptation.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:45:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:45:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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