ENHANCING TRANSLATION OF AN EVIDENCE-BASED INTERVENTION INTO PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICE

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157312
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ENHANCING TRANSLATION OF AN EVIDENCE-BASED INTERVENTION INTO PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICE
Abstract:
ENHANCING TRANSLATION OF AN EVIDENCE-BASED INTERVENTION INTO PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICE
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:O'Brien, Ruth A., PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Denver
Title:Professor
Contact Address:13120 E. 19th Avenue, Room 4319, Campus Mail Box C288-19, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA
Co-Authors:Zhaoxing Pan; Lucy Repaci
PURPOSES/AIMS: This study investigated the question: Does the implementation of an augmented approach to education of home visitors and supervisors for delivery of the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) program improve staff performance, fidelity to the program model, and family outcomes relative to child maltreatment and early behaviors associated with youth violence?
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: The literature on the dissemination of research interventions has noted that there often is widespread variability in implementation as programs are scaled up, with many prevention activities not being implemented with sufficient strength and fidelity to produce the intended outcomes. Data from six years of dissemination of the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP), a research-based home visitation program for low-income, first-time parents, revealed that nurses in community settings consistently spent 10-15% less time per visit on the promotion of parenting and child growth and development than did nurses in the research trials.
METHODS: A cluster randomized design was used with nurse home visitors and supervisors assigned by site to receive either the NFP standard education (N=4 sites) or the NFP augmented education (N=4 sites), i.e., standard education plus additional content on child development and parenting and related structured consultations for supervisors. Three hypotheses were tested:
1. Nurses receiving the augmented education with structured clinical consultation to supervisors, compared to nurses receiving the standard education, will demonstrate: (a) greater knowledge of maternal and child growth and development; and (b) greater attainment of performance criteria related to the promotion of competent parenting.
2. Nurses receiving the augmented education with structured clinical consultation to supervisors, compared to nurses receiving the standard education, will cover a greater proportion of parenting content and spend more time on the promotion of competent parenting with families.
3. Families visited by nurses receiving the augmented education with structured clinical consultation to supervisors, compared to nurses receiving the standard education, will have: (a) fewer referrals to Child Protective Services for child maltreatment; (b) fewer emergency room visits and hospitalizations for child injuries; (c) children who demonstrate higher expressive language skills at 21 months; and (d) children who demonstrate fewer behaviors associated with early emotional dysregulation.
RESULTS: Hypothesis 1 was partially supported with nurses receiving the augmented education demonstrating greater knowledge for helping parents manage irritable infants and toddler behaviors. Hypothesis 2 was not supported. Contrary to expectation (Hypothesis 3), nurses receiving the augmented education made more referrals to Child Protective Services, although the reasons for referral were for less overt concerns than child abuse.
IMPLICATIONS: Nurses in the augmented education group reported strain in completing the additional educational modules due to workplace constraints, but felt the overall benefits outweighed the strain. Challenges encountered in the conduct of the study suggest the need to replicate the study with a larger sample of program sites.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleENHANCING TRANSLATION OF AN EVIDENCE-BASED INTERVENTION INTO PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157312-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">ENHANCING TRANSLATION OF AN EVIDENCE-BASED INTERVENTION INTO PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICE</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">O'Brien, Ruth A., PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Denver</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">13120 E. 19th Avenue, Room 4319, Campus Mail Box C288-19, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Ruth.Obrien@ucdenver.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Zhaoxing Pan; Lucy Repaci</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: This study investigated the question: Does the implementation of an augmented approach to education of home visitors and supervisors for delivery of the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) program improve staff performance, fidelity to the program model, and family outcomes relative to child maltreatment and early behaviors associated with youth violence? <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: The literature on the dissemination of research interventions has noted that there often is widespread variability in implementation as programs are scaled up, with many prevention activities not being implemented with sufficient strength and fidelity to produce the intended outcomes. Data from six years of dissemination of the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP), a research-based home visitation program for low-income, first-time parents, revealed that nurses in community settings consistently spent 10-15% less time per visit on the promotion of parenting and child growth and development than did nurses in the research trials.<br/>METHODS: A cluster randomized design was used with nurse home visitors and supervisors assigned by site to receive either the NFP standard education (N=4 sites) or the NFP augmented education (N=4 sites), i.e., standard education plus additional content on child development and parenting and related structured consultations for supervisors. Three hypotheses were tested:<br/>1. Nurses receiving the augmented education with structured clinical consultation to supervisors, compared to nurses receiving the standard education, will demonstrate: (a) greater knowledge of maternal and child growth and development; and (b) greater attainment of performance criteria related to the promotion of competent parenting.<br/>2. Nurses receiving the augmented education with structured clinical consultation to supervisors, compared to nurses receiving the standard education, will cover a greater proportion of parenting content and spend more time on the promotion of competent parenting with families.<br/>3. Families visited by nurses receiving the augmented education with structured clinical consultation to supervisors, compared to nurses receiving the standard education, will have: (a) fewer referrals to Child Protective Services for child maltreatment; (b) fewer emergency room visits and hospitalizations for child injuries; (c) children who demonstrate higher expressive language skills at 21 months; and (d) children who demonstrate fewer behaviors associated with early emotional dysregulation.<br/>RESULTS: Hypothesis 1 was partially supported with nurses receiving the augmented education demonstrating greater knowledge for helping parents manage irritable infants and toddler behaviors. Hypothesis 2 was not supported. Contrary to expectation (Hypothesis 3), nurses receiving the augmented education made more referrals to Child Protective Services, although the reasons for referral were for less overt concerns than child abuse.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: Nurses in the augmented education group reported strain in completing the additional educational modules due to workplace constraints, but felt the overall benefits outweighed the strain. Challenges encountered in the conduct of the study suggest the need to replicate the study with a larger sample of program sites.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:45:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:45:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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