SURVEY OF NURSES REGARDING THE IMPLEMENTATION, USE AND EFFECTIVENESS OF CAPNOGRAPHY

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157317
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SURVEY OF NURSES REGARDING THE IMPLEMENTATION, USE AND EFFECTIVENESS OF CAPNOGRAPHY
Abstract:
SURVEY OF NURSES REGARDING THE IMPLEMENTATION, USE AND EFFECTIVENESS OF CAPNOGRAPHY
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Payne, Catherine E., CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:Graduate student at California State University, Chico. Employer- University of California Davis Medical Center
Title:RN
Contact Address:9251 Native Dancer Lane, Elk Grove, CA, 95624, USA
Co-Authors:Irene Morgan
PURPOSES/AIMS:
Survey nurses to determine whether capnography is considered an important monitoring adjunct in the provision of safe and effective nursing care.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
Care of patients in the emergency department (ED) is challenging in the immediate resuscitation period. Vital signs and patientÆs symptoms may change quickly requiring emergency department nurses to rapidly identify patient's needs and intervene to reduce risks to patientÆs stability. Early in the resuscitation, aggressive interventions have been found to improve patient outcomes and monitoring is critical in this effort. Intubated patients pose an increase challenge to emergency department nurses because of the array of potential or actual complications associated with mechanical ventilation. The artificial airway poses a risk for obstruction, displacement or dislodgment requiring nurses to rapidly identify life-threatening situations that require immediate interventions. One adjunct recommended for use in the emergency department, though not widely available or consistently used, is capnography. Capnography offers information about clinical status that other monitoring devices cannot evaluate. This technology is new to the emergency department setting and requires nurses to become comfortable with using this technology to interpret values and waveforms to provide safe and effective care. Emergency department nurses must meet the demands of intubated patients and capnography provides one source of information to proficiently manage this vulnerable population. The approach to the care of an intubated patient is by assessing for limiting factors and developing interventions towards the achievement of optimum health. The theoretical framework to be used in this study will be Dorothea E. Orem's Self Care Deficit Theory.
METHODS:
A quantitative, descriptive design has been chosen to explore emergency department nurse's views about capnography. The research setting is a 613 bed Level I Adult and Pediatric Trauma Hospital and Research Center treating approximately 53,000 patients each year in their emergency department. This emergency department was chosen because it has recently implemented a standard of care in which all intubated patients are required to have capnography.
RESULTS:
Research study is in progress.
IMPLICATIONS:
This research study is in its early stages in order to gain more information about the use of capnography by emergency department nurses. The study will provide a clearer understanding of the current nursing practice of capnography in the emergency department. The research study will be used to determine whether emergency department nurses view capnography as a valuable asset during patient assessment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSURVEY OF NURSES REGARDING THE IMPLEMENTATION, USE AND EFFECTIVENESS OF CAPNOGRAPHYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157317-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">SURVEY OF NURSES REGARDING THE IMPLEMENTATION, USE AND EFFECTIVENESS OF CAPNOGRAPHY</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Payne, Catherine E., CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Graduate student at California State University, Chico. Employer- University of California Davis Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">9251 Native Dancer Lane, Elk Grove, CA, 95624, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">fncpayne@aol.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Irene Morgan</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>Survey nurses to determine whether capnography is considered an important monitoring adjunct in the provision of safe and effective nursing care. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: <br/>Care of patients in the emergency department (ED) is challenging in the immediate resuscitation period. Vital signs and patient&AElig;s symptoms may change quickly requiring emergency department nurses to rapidly identify patient's needs and intervene to reduce risks to patient&AElig;s stability. Early in the resuscitation, aggressive interventions have been found to improve patient outcomes and monitoring is critical in this effort. Intubated patients pose an increase challenge to emergency department nurses because of the array of potential or actual complications associated with mechanical ventilation. The artificial airway poses a risk for obstruction, displacement or dislodgment requiring nurses to rapidly identify life-threatening situations that require immediate interventions. One adjunct recommended for use in the emergency department, though not widely available or consistently used, is capnography. Capnography offers information about clinical status that other monitoring devices cannot evaluate. This technology is new to the emergency department setting and requires nurses to become comfortable with using this technology to interpret values and waveforms to provide safe and effective care. Emergency department nurses must meet the demands of intubated patients and capnography provides one source of information to proficiently manage this vulnerable population. The approach to the care of an intubated patient is by assessing for limiting factors and developing interventions towards the achievement of optimum health. The theoretical framework to be used in this study will be Dorothea E. Orem's Self Care Deficit Theory. <br/>METHODS: <br/>A quantitative, descriptive design has been chosen to explore emergency department nurse's views about capnography. The research setting is a 613 bed Level I Adult and Pediatric Trauma Hospital and Research Center treating approximately 53,000 patients each year in their emergency department. This emergency department was chosen because it has recently implemented a standard of care in which all intubated patients are required to have capnography. <br/>RESULTS: <br/>Research study is in progress. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: <br/>This research study is in its early stages in order to gain more information about the use of capnography by emergency department nurses. The study will provide a clearer understanding of the current nursing practice of capnography in the emergency department. The research study will be used to determine whether emergency department nurses view capnography as a valuable asset during patient assessment.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:45:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:45:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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