COMPARING PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN CULTURALLY DEAF MEN AND WOMEN: A SECONDARY ANALYSIS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157318
Type:
Presentation
Title:
COMPARING PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN CULTURALLY DEAF MEN AND WOMEN: A SECONDARY ANALYSIS
Abstract:
COMPARING PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN CULTURALLY DEAF MEN AND WOMEN: A SECONDARY ANALYSIS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Pelton, Derrick K., BS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:3710 W Hideout Trl, Tucson, AZ, 85742, USA
Co-Authors:Elaine Jones
PURPOSE/AIMS: This study was a secondary analysis of the Validating the Adapted 7-Day Physical Activity Record by Pedometer With Deaf Adults study. The purpose of this study was to compare differences in physical activity in culturally Deaf men and women. Additional research questions explored were differences in the relationships between 1) body mass index (BMI) and physical activity, 2) age and physical activity, and 3) education level and physical activity.
RATIONALE/BACKGROUND: There is evidence that Deaf adults may be at risk for inadequate physical activity, but there is no evidence about whether Deaf men are more active than Deaf women. From the numerous studies to evaluate interventions to increase physical activity among various populations, including men versus women, none have targeted Deaf adults, and how they would benefit from interventions tailored for their cultural context. In addition, none have addressed the question of whether Deaf men are more active than Deaf women, which is consistent with other research about physical activity among men versus women in other populations.
METHODS: The sample population of the secondary analysis consisted of 30 participants who satisfied the inclusion criteria. Step count obtained from the Yamax Digiwalker pedometer and demographic sheet were used to collect data. Statistical analyses performed included t tests to show significance between physical activity and men and women, and Pearson correlation to show relationships between physical activity and BMI, age, and education level.
RESULTS: Results from the study found no significant relationship between physical activity and culturally Deaf men and women, and no correlation between physical activity and BMI, age, and education level.
IMPLICATIONS: The overall implication of this study was the need for further research involving the culturally Deaf population. From the limited resources that pertain to the Deaf community, statistics such as the estimated number of culturally Deaf adults, research on physical activity, and other health statistics are almost entirely based on outdated estimates, the hearing population, and other minority groups. Conducting more research with the culturally Deaf community will ultimately give rise to their trends in health, major chronic and acute health problems, and most importantly, areas where physical activity interventions will have the greatest impact.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCOMPARING PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN CULTURALLY DEAF MEN AND WOMEN: A SECONDARY ANALYSISen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157318-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">COMPARING PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN CULTURALLY DEAF MEN AND WOMEN: A SECONDARY ANALYSIS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pelton, Derrick K., BS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3710 W Hideout Trl, Tucson, AZ, 85742, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dpelton@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Elaine Jones</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE/AIMS: This study was a secondary analysis of the Validating the Adapted 7-Day Physical Activity Record by Pedometer With Deaf Adults study. The purpose of this study was to compare differences in physical activity in culturally Deaf men and women. Additional research questions explored were differences in the relationships between 1) body mass index (BMI) and physical activity, 2) age and physical activity, and 3) education level and physical activity. <br/>RATIONALE/BACKGROUND: There is evidence that Deaf adults may be at risk for inadequate physical activity, but there is no evidence about whether Deaf men are more active than Deaf women. From the numerous studies to evaluate interventions to increase physical activity among various populations, including men versus women, none have targeted Deaf adults, and how they would benefit from interventions tailored for their cultural context. In addition, none have addressed the question of whether Deaf men are more active than Deaf women, which is consistent with other research about physical activity among men versus women in other populations.<br/>METHODS: The sample population of the secondary analysis consisted of 30 participants who satisfied the inclusion criteria. Step count obtained from the Yamax Digiwalker pedometer and demographic sheet were used to collect data. Statistical analyses performed included t tests to show significance between physical activity and men and women, and Pearson correlation to show relationships between physical activity and BMI, age, and education level.<br/>RESULTS: Results from the study found no significant relationship between physical activity and culturally Deaf men and women, and no correlation between physical activity and BMI, age, and education level.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: The overall implication of this study was the need for further research involving the culturally Deaf population. From the limited resources that pertain to the Deaf community, statistics such as the estimated number of culturally Deaf adults, research on physical activity, and other health statistics are almost entirely based on outdated estimates, the hearing population, and other minority groups. Conducting more research with the culturally Deaf community will ultimately give rise to their trends in health, major chronic and acute health problems, and most importantly, areas where physical activity interventions will have the greatest impact. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:45:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:45:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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