2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157321
Type:
Presentation
Title:
FIRST THINGS FIRST: RESEARCH TRANSLATION TO COMMUNITY PRACTICE
Abstract:
FIRST THINGS FIRST: RESEARCH TRANSLATION TO COMMUNITY PRACTICE
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Perez, Adriana, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:500 North 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA
Co-Authors:Colleen Keller; Kathryn Records; Allison Nagle
PURPOSES/AIMS: There is a short supply of effective, sustainable and generalizable health promotion and disease prevention programs that have been translated into practice, particularly related to preconception and interconception care among Latinas. The purpose of this report is to describe how the critical inputs of a theory-based intervention have been translated to an effectiveness demonstration project and the issues of intervention fidelity used in the process.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Preconception health care has taken increased importance in maternal child health circles because while there has been much improvement in pregnancy outcomes in the last century there has been a decrease in the rate of that progress over the last 20 years. Preconception care is defined as interventions that modify biomedical, behavioral, and social risks to a woman's health or pregnancy outcome through prevention and management, emphasizing those factors which must be acted on before conception or early in pregnancy to have maximal impact. Latinas are suffering with higher rates of postpartum depression than non-Hispanic white mothers and focus group data of Latina mothers in Maricopa County Public Health (2008) have shown limited knowledge of post-partum depression among this population. Further, comprehensive reviews have shown that excessive pre-pregnancy weight, weight gain in pregnancy, ethnicity, race, postpartum family roles and work, dietary transitional changes during pregnancy and reduced physical activity (PA) are correlates to weight retention following childbirth. The known risks of morbidity and mortality associated with being overweight, including breast cancer, heart disease, and diabetes, make factors associated with weight gain in postpartum women an important public health concern.
METHODS: The Maricopa Special Health Care District, has implemented a pre-post natal program modeled after theory-based interventions for at risk women in the FTF Central and South Phoenix Regional Partnership areas by using strategies found to be effective and important in promoting health among Hispanic women. The time following a birth has been shown to be an optimal time to offer mothers the support, education, and monitoring needed to promote future healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. The two theory based interventions will be adapted for effectiveness in community health settings: a postpartum support group, and a Madres' Walking Group. Weekly intervention meetings will include a group walk designed to model moderate-intensity walking in a supportive group setting that will be facilitated by Promotoras and will focus on nutrition, social support, or stress of caring for an infant. Feasibility and acceptability will be measured using attendance and attrition logs.
RESULTS: Application of efficacious research interventions require careful consideration of the setting, the intended participants and sound operationalization of intervention critical inputs as they are adapted for maximum effectiveness implementation.
IMPLICATIONS: Effectiveness research requires negotiation with community planners, consistence of intervention, implementation and outcomes across settings, and consideration of program sustainability and institutionalization within the setting.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFIRST THINGS FIRST: RESEARCH TRANSLATION TO COMMUNITY PRACTICEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157321-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">FIRST THINGS FIRST: RESEARCH TRANSLATION TO COMMUNITY PRACTICE</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Perez, Adriana, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 North 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">adriana.rivera@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Colleen Keller; Kathryn Records; Allison Nagle</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: There is a short supply of effective, sustainable and generalizable health promotion and disease prevention programs that have been translated into practice, particularly related to preconception and interconception care among Latinas. The purpose of this report is to describe how the critical inputs of a theory-based intervention have been translated to an effectiveness demonstration project and the issues of intervention fidelity used in the process. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Preconception health care has taken increased importance in maternal child health circles because while there has been much improvement in pregnancy outcomes in the last century there has been a decrease in the rate of that progress over the last 20 years. Preconception care is defined as interventions that modify biomedical, behavioral, and social risks to a woman's health or pregnancy outcome through prevention and management, emphasizing those factors which must be acted on before conception or early in pregnancy to have maximal impact. Latinas are suffering with higher rates of postpartum depression than non-Hispanic white mothers and focus group data of Latina mothers in Maricopa County Public Health (2008) have shown limited knowledge of post-partum depression among this population. Further, comprehensive reviews have shown that excessive pre-pregnancy weight, weight gain in pregnancy, ethnicity, race, postpartum family roles and work, dietary transitional changes during pregnancy and reduced physical activity (PA) are correlates to weight retention following childbirth. The known risks of morbidity and mortality associated with being overweight, including breast cancer, heart disease, and diabetes, make factors associated with weight gain in postpartum women an important public health concern. <br/>METHODS: The Maricopa Special Health Care District, has implemented a pre-post natal program modeled after theory-based interventions for at risk women in the FTF Central and South Phoenix Regional Partnership areas by using strategies found to be effective and important in promoting health among Hispanic women. The time following a birth has been shown to be an optimal time to offer mothers the support, education, and monitoring needed to promote future healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. The two theory based interventions will be adapted for effectiveness in community health settings: a postpartum support group, and a Madres' Walking Group. Weekly intervention meetings will include a group walk designed to model moderate-intensity walking in a supportive group setting that will be facilitated by Promotoras and will focus on nutrition, social support, or stress of caring for an infant. Feasibility and acceptability will be measured using attendance and attrition logs. <br/>RESULTS: Application of efficacious research interventions require careful consideration of the setting, the intended participants and sound operationalization of intervention critical inputs as they are adapted for maximum effectiveness implementation. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Effectiveness research requires negotiation with community planners, consistence of intervention, implementation and outcomes across settings, and consideration of program sustainability and institutionalization within the setting. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:46:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:46:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.